Warm greetings from Colima, Mexico


Joined
Feb 2, 2016
Messages
1,803
Reaction score
2,026
Location
Colima, Mexico
Hardiness Zone
USDA Zone 11
Country
Mexico
Hello gardeners. I am from the US living and gardening in tropical Colima, Mexico (USDA Zone 11) at the base of one of the world's most active volcanoes, 40 miles from the Pacific Ocean. I am retired, am an organic gardener, and have a garden that supports pollinators and butterflies with nectar plants and host plants (for the butterflies and moths), and am a confessed lover of caterpillars and other garden critters (except the leaf-cutter ants :rolleyes:). I am looking forward to meeting you all, talking dirt and many other things. Here is a photo by Tapiro of our volcano at night.

Volcan de Colima by Tapiro Dec 13 2015 9.30pm.jpg
 
Ad

Advertisements

Joined
Dec 6, 2015
Messages
743
Reaction score
1,395
Location
Essex, England
Showcase(s):
1
Hardiness Zone
6a
Country
United Kingdom
Welcome Beverly to the forum I'm sure your find plenty of dirt talk here. I for one have never seen a active volcano so am glade to be the first to say hi and welcome to someone that lives' so close to one. that volcano looks so cool! (Hot Dirt:barefoot:)
 
Joined
Feb 2, 2016
Messages
1,803
Reaction score
2,026
Location
Colima, Mexico
Hardiness Zone
USDA Zone 11
Country
Mexico
:LOL::LOL:Hi Daren.. hot dirt indeed...no nasty nematodes in that dirt. Barefoot? Ooooh, i don't think so. Thanks for the welcome, we are very proud of our volcano here. Wired Magazine named it the most spectacular volcano in the world for 2015. The volcano generates its own lightning which is caused by volcanic particles rubbing together really fast when exiting the mountain. It's better than TV, that's for sure. You have a fine looking terrier there that i'm not sure i've seen before. What is that breed? Hope to see you on the forums. What is that smiley, 2nd row, second icon? It looks like poop or a cupcake, i can't decide.
 
Joined
Feb 2, 2016
Messages
1,803
Reaction score
2,026
Location
Colima, Mexico
Hardiness Zone
USDA Zone 11
Country
Mexico
Thank you for the welcome JB! I'm looking forward to taking a look at your Native Garden. I grow a lot of native plants too, the butterflies and other critters show a preference for wild natives, but when it comes down to it they will eat just about anything....except the caterpillars of course who are soooo fussy.
 
Ad

Advertisements

Joined
Dec 6, 2015
Messages
743
Reaction score
1,395
Location
Essex, England
Showcase(s):
1
Hardiness Zone
6a
Country
United Kingdom
You mean :poop:?....that's poop :)although I am guessing as I have them all on one line;) my dog............. that's a wicker dog I made out of willow & then stuffed it with hydrangea flowers ............But hay this is nothing compared to having a volcano generates its own lightning! Here in England we just get Rain mostly with the odd rainbow, without the pot of gold. Maybe a little sunshine if its a really good day. So glade to have you on the forum ..........So what grows well in the shadow of a spectacular Volcano ? not that I'm likely to move anywhere near one but I could get quizzed on it and I'd love to know?.... I'd guess chillies and red hot poker:D
 
Joined
Feb 2, 2016
Messages
1,803
Reaction score
2,026
Location
Colima, Mexico
Hardiness Zone
USDA Zone 11
Country
Mexico
Thank you splinx...looks like you are a little bit south of where i am but same zone, what do you grow?
 
Joined
Feb 2, 2016
Messages
1,803
Reaction score
2,026
Location
Colima, Mexico
Hardiness Zone
USDA Zone 11
Country
Mexico
Yes, that's the one. I've never seen that one before. It should have a little steam coming off the top. Well, your dog looks great and that you made the frame from wicker is amazing, an artistic gardener...really clever, with hydrangea flowers. Now that i know, i can see it, but it is such a small picture. Do you make other things from wicker, like furniture?

The volcano does not cast a shadow in our direction. I am on the south western side which is really nice because 99% of the time the ash from the eruptions goes directly northeast and our skies remain clear. The mountain does provide natural air conditioning for us generally in the late afternoon and also provides our water that flows naturally (without electricity) into our homes. The hot air from the city rises and the cool air from the mountain sinks to gives us cool afternoon breezes that are so lovely and appreciated. Chilies grow here of course and lots of fruit like pineapple, bananas, papaya, jack fruit, tons of limes, mangoes everywhere, maguay. Bougainvillea, Cosmos, Tithonia rotudifolia, aristolochia all grow wild here, a variety of asclepias species, and so many other things. We have a large variety of palms, jatropha, a magnificent large tree of hard wood called Perota, morning glories, antigonon leptopus and passiflora vines...egad what an impossible question to answer...there are pine and cedar trees higher up on the mountain. What grows here would fill a few volumes, i am sure. I have a small garden and grow Senecio confusus vine, Odontonema, Plumbago, Asclepias, Conoclinium, Jatropha multifida and integerrima, morning glories, Areca palms, zinnias, Dalechampia dioscoreifolia (from Costa Rica), Cestrum nocturnium, Murraya, Hibiscus, Ixora coccinea, Cosmos, Jasmine, Justicia, Cornutia grandifolia (from Costa Rica), parsley, and probably a few other things that i am not thinking of at the time. Amazingly enough i found many of the seeds i used to start these plants from vendors in the UK...very keen gardeners, the British. Many of these plants are grown in northern climes as annuals, here they are perennials. Okay, now commit them all to your memory:geek:.
 
Joined
Jan 12, 2016
Messages
119
Reaction score
21
Hardiness Zone
12b - 13b
Country
Mexico
Welcome to the forums!

Wow, impressive picture of the Colima volcano! I live in Aguascalientes, MX. I'm happy to find other Mexicans in the forum :).
 
Joined
Jul 17, 2013
Messages
3,391
Reaction score
946
Hi there! Welcome to the forum! I live in Mexico as well, to be more exact I live in the north of the country. The weather is nothing like colima, ours is more dry , but we can still grow things like avocados and lemons. Anyways, I just wanted to welcome you to this forum, I am sure you will enjoy your stay!
 
Ad

Advertisements

Joined
Apr 14, 2015
Messages
3,074
Reaction score
2,458
Location
Inverness-Shire, Scotland
Hardiness Zone
8a
Country
United Kingdom
Welcome to the forum Beverly. You certainly live in an unusual area.

If you hover your mouse over the smileys it will tell you what they are. :)
 
Joined
Mar 27, 2012
Messages
4,212
Reaction score
2,705
Hardiness Zone
9a
Country
United Kingdom
Welcome to the forum @Beverly! Great to have you here :) That's very interesting about the volcano!
 
Joined
Feb 2, 2016
Messages
1,803
Reaction score
2,026
Location
Colima, Mexico
Hardiness Zone
USDA Zone 11
Country
Mexico
Thank you for the welcome @fuumarumota, I too am happy to find more people who live in Mexico. And, thank you @Trellum! Do you know about each other?. Trellum is from the north. Plus there is @gata montes who lives in Nayarit. That makes 4 of us that i know about...truly an avalanche of people living in Mexico for a gardening site. This is very exciting to me because "gardening" has not historically been part of the culture here in Mexico. When many people here discover that i garden and actually do the work myself AND enjoy it, they wrinkle up their noses at me:). This is my generation (tercera edad). Now i think the younger generations here are beginning to involve themselves with gardening, fauna & flora, and nature-related activities and this is very exciting. Are you all familiar with CONABIO here? They are doing wonderful work to help preserve the fauna and flora of Mexico. Do you know i had to find seeds for many of my native plants in the UK and the US? Native plants from Mexico are highly sought after in many parts of the world except Mexico...up until recently when things are appearing to change. It makes me so happy because this country is magnificent and beautiful and grand and has much to offer the world. I spent 5 years hiking with friends to unknown parts of the country, to places people don't live and was astonished at the beauty i saw and see. Saludos calidos a todos de ustedes.
 
Joined
Jul 17, 2013
Messages
3,391
Reaction score
946
Thank you for the welcome @fuumarumota, I too am happy to find more people who live in Mexico. And, thank you @Trellum! Do you know about each other?. Trellum is from the north. Plus there is @gata montes who lives in Nayarit. That makes 4 of us that i know about...truly an avalanche of people living in Mexico for a gardening site. This is very exciting to me because "gardening" has not historically been part of the culture here in Mexico. When many people here discover that i garden and actually do the work myself AND enjoy it, they wrinkle up their noses at me:). This is my generation (tercera edad). Now i think the younger generations here are beginning to involve themselves with gardening, fauna & flora, and nature-related activities and this is very exciting. Are you all familiar with CONABIO here? They are doing wonderful work to help preserve the fauna and flora of Mexico. Do you know i had to find seeds for many of my native plants in the UK and the US? Native plants from Mexico are highly sought after in many parts of the world except Mexico...up until recently when things are appearing to change. It makes me so happy because this country is magnificent and beautiful and grand and has much to offer the world. I spent 5 years hiking with friends to unknown parts of the country, to places people don't live and was astonished at the beauty i saw and see. Saludos calidos a todos de ustedes.

I know what you mean! One thing I noticed is that the gardening supplies stores are so tiny in Mexico when compare those the ones you see all over the Netherlands! Dutch people do seem to be more into gardening, Mexicans not so much ;) Many over here in the north had a grandpa or grandma or some other ancestor who was a farmer, so I think many of them can't help but to see gardening as more of a chore than a hobby. What are your favorite native plants??? If is not much indiscretion... what brought you to mexico exactly? I'm just curious.
 
Ad

Advertisements

Joined
Jan 12, 2016
Messages
119
Reaction score
21
Hardiness Zone
12b - 13b
Country
Mexico
Thank you for the welcome @fuumarumota, I too am happy to find more people who live in Mexico. And, thank you @Trellum! Do you know about each other?. Trellum is from the north. Plus there is @gata montes who lives in Nayarit. That makes 4 of us that i know about...truly an avalanche of people living in Mexico for a gardening site. This is very exciting to me because "gardening" has not historically been part of the culture here in Mexico. When many people here discover that i garden and actually do the work myself AND enjoy it, they wrinkle up their noses at me:). This is my generation (tercera edad). Now i think the younger generations here are beginning to involve themselves with gardening, fauna & flora, and nature-related activities and this is very exciting. Are you all familiar with CONABIO here? They are doing wonderful work to help preserve the fauna and flora of Mexico. Do you know i had to find seeds for many of my native plants in the UK and the US? Native plants from Mexico are highly sought after in many parts of the world except Mexico...up until recently when things are appearing to change. It makes me so happy because this country is magnificent and beautiful and grand and has much to offer the world. I spent 5 years hiking with friends to unknown parts of the country, to places people don't live and was astonished at the beauty i saw and see. Saludos calidos a todos de ustedes.

Plus hard times for this country are coming, we must push towards sustainability. Besides, homegrown food is a lot healthier :)
 
Joined
Feb 2, 2016
Messages
1,803
Reaction score
2,026
Location
Colima, Mexico
Hardiness Zone
USDA Zone 11
Country
Mexico
I know what you mean! One thing I noticed is that the gardening supplies stores are so tiny in Mexico when compare those the ones you see all over the Netherlands! Dutch people do seem to be more into gardening, Mexicans not so much ;) Many over here in the north had a grandpa or grandma or some other ancestor who was a farmer, so I think many of them can't help but to see gardening as more of a chore than a hobby. What are your favorite native plants??? If is not much indiscretion... what brought you to mexico exactly? I'm just curious.

Hi Trellum, yes it is difficult to get some garden products as well as plants...you can imagine how much harder it was 8 years ago. But i have good news for you! There are many products, plants, & seeds available on www.mercadolibre.com.mx. That's one of the ways i know that the younger generation is getting involved, because of the demand for more gardening products and plants and seeds is getting the attention of some vendors. I find food quality Diatomaceous Earth there, organic wasp traps (i have an abundance of wasps and just pulled down some nests from the Dalechampia vine the other day so i need to reduce the populations because they are eating all my caterpillars). I found some molasses there for use when highly diluted to amend the soil and add minerals like potassium, calcium, iron, and magnesium. Unfortunately the molasses was not refined and fermented in the bottle which blew up when i opened it and covered me and the utility room with a thick gooey mess:LOL:. I had to clean it up in a hurry before the ants found it. So, for now i order organic, unsulphured molasses from the US, but i expect mercadolibre to have some good molasses in the near future. I also found rain barrels there so i can collect water during the rainy season. Colima does not have a water problem, but the world has a water problem and that means a problem for everyone so i am feeling really happy about these additions to my garden. Also, i find mercadolibre an excellent site to do business with, very well run and organized and trustworthy. So there you go, products at your fingertips.

Yes, i agree completely that the older generation (and growing middle class) want to distance themselves from their farming roots and the poverty associated with that lifestyle. This has occurred in many newly industrialized countries, including the US with people born in the early 1900's.

All of the native plants are my favorites and there are too many to mention, but if i had to say or go to jail, i would say Pseudogynoxys chenopodioides (aka Senecio confusus aka Mexican Flame Vine) native to the El Tejin region of Veracruz. Ruellia, Asclepias c., Ixora coccinea, Justicia brandeegeana (Red Shrimp Plant), Cosmos...all of these plants i have a great fondness for.

When i was 10 years old, i remember traveling in the car with my family, and thinking that i would like to retire abroad somewhere to learn another language, another culture, as an adventure to keep my life rich for as long as it lasts. I did not find it odd that i was thinking these thoughts at the time, but looking back on it, i find it extremely odd:eek:. So this was rolling around the back of my mind for many years. I did not know where, some time later i decided it would have to be warm. I did research on a variety of places and for a number of reasons, decided on Mexico. At some point i suggested this to my husband as a courtesy more than any thing else because i knew he would not be suited for this kind of change. At some point later, after both of my parents had passed away, my husband and i had separated, my other relatives were grown and independent, i found myself free and took care of some business, and up and moved to Guadalajara (5years prior to generally accepted retirement age). I was in Guadalajara for 5 years having the rich, lively, and learning experience i anticipated and found many friends there. But Guadalajara is a mile high city and when the sun goes down it is very very cold, after 5 years i moved to Colima and started a garden. It was so much exactly the right decision for me. It has been and remains to be an adventure so full of life experience and learning and miracles. That's kind of a long reply, but it really is the short version. And, what about you? What brings you to Mexico?
 
Ad

Advertisements

Joined
Jul 17, 2013
Messages
3,391
Reaction score
946
Hi Trellum, yes it is difficult to get some garden products as well as plants...you can imagine how much harder it was 8 years ago. But i have good news for you! There are many products, plants, & seeds available on www.mercadolibre.com.mx. That's one of the ways i know that the younger generation is getting involved, because of the demand for more gardening products and plants and seeds is getting the attention of some vendors. I find food quality Diatomaceous Earth there, organic wasp traps (i have an abundance of wasps and just pulled down some nests from the Dalechampia vine the other day so i need to reduce the populations because they are eating all my caterpillars). I found some molasses there for use when highly diluted to amend the soil and add minerals like potassium, calcium, iron, and magnesium. Unfortunately the molasses was not refined and fermented in the bottle which blew up when i opened it and covered me and the utility room with a thick gooey mess:LOL:. I had to clean it up in a hurry before the ants found it. So, for now i order organic, unsulphured molasses from the US, but i expect mercadolibre to have some good molasses in the near future. I also found rain barrels there so i can collect water during the rainy season. Colima does not have a water problem, but the world has a water problem and that means a problem for everyone so i am feeling really happy about these additions to my garden. Also, i find mercadolibre an excellent site to do business with, very well run and organized and trustworthy. So there you go, products at your fingertips.

Yes, i agree completely that the older generation (and growing middle class) want to distance themselves from their farming roots and the poverty associated with that lifestyle. This has occurred in many newly industrialized countries, including the US with people born in the early 1900's.

All of the native plants are my favorites and there are too many to mention, but if i had to say or go to jail, i would say Pseudogynoxys chenopodioides (aka Senecio confusus aka Mexican Flame Vine) native to the El Tejin region of Veracruz. Ruellia, Asclepias c., Ixora coccinea, Justicia brandeegeana (Red Shrimp Plant), Cosmos...all of these plants i have a great fondness for.

When i was 10 years old, i remember traveling in the car with my family, and thinking that i would like to retire abroad somewhere to learn another language, another culture, as an adventure to keep my life rich for as long as it lasts. I did not find it odd that i was thinking these thoughts at the time, but looking back on it, i find it extremely odd:eek:. So this was rolling around the back of my mind for many years. I did not know where, some time later i decided it would have to be warm. I did research on a variety of places and for a number of reasons, decided on Mexico. At some point i suggested this to my husband as a courtesy more than any thing else because i knew he would not be suited for this kind of change. At some point later, after both of my parents had passed away, my husband and i had separated, my other relatives were grown and independent, i found myself free and took care of some business, and up and moved to Guadalajara (5years prior to generally accepted retirement age). I was in Guadalajara for 5 years having the rich, lively, and learning experience i anticipated and found many friends there. But Guadalajara is a mile high city and when the sun goes down it is very very cold, after 5 years i moved to Colima and started a garden. It was so much exactly the right decision for me. It has been and remains to be an adventure so full of life experience and learning and miracles. That's kind of a long reply, but it really is the short version. And, what about you? What brings you to Mexico?

You seem to know quite well the native plants of Mexico! Amazing! To be honest I had never seen or hear about that shrimp plant ;) Colima is very different from places like ''Chihuahua'', ever heard of it? Not as exciting as Colima, I am afraid, most of the plants you see in the ''wild'' are cacti, but guess what? Peyote grows here too, lol! I've seen it, we used to go exploring (not really hiking) to some nearby mountains (we might have seen a Puma once - yes, now I think about it that was so risky!) and that is when I saw the peyote.

I like to use mercadolibre from time to time, but so far I had only used it to order the usual kind of things, I never thought of ordering gardening supplies (I've stopped gardening since the last year because I am going back to the Netherlands for good). I'm not very excited, I never made dream of growing a lemon tree come true :( I wanted to do that and maybe use the lemons to make some homemade limonetto ;) I love homemade liquor, it's a hobby of mine and is not so hard to find the supplies locally, of course this is a secret not many people know.

I'm glad to hear you made your dream come true :) I had a similar experience while growing up, when I was little my mom says I was always talking about moving abroad, and guess what? I did it! Several times actually. Have you ever been to Mexico city? I was there recently, had the best pulque ever! Sad to go, but I'll be coming back every year, because I have family here too ;) That is what brought me here.

Been back and forward for a while, but I am starting to get tired of moving so much. So I decided to settle in the Netherlands because my husband thought it was the best, mostly because of work and because we want to start a family soon. Right now Chihuahua is not the best place to raise a family (if I am completely honest with you). During the summer and spring this place is like an oven, but so is Hoorn with its canals :confused: But definitely no lemon trees can grow there :( Definitely not in my tiny garden...
 

Ask a Question

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

You'll need to choose a username for the site, which only take a couple of moments. After that, you can post your question and our members will help you out.

Ask a Question

Top