Vegetables you can regrow inside your house or garden


Joined
Dec 7, 2017
Messages
42
Reaction score
38
Location
Rome
Hardiness Zone
9b
Country
Italy
Hi there!
Despite the fact I really love plants, I've never experienced growing them.
About a month ago I had watched by chance this type of video:
and so I've immediately cut some vegetables I had in the fridge, and put them in a small amount of water.
After two weeks I have planted them in a pot and now I wonder if they will grow or not.
25105388_10155009418486720_602430941_n.jpg
 
Ad

Advertisements

Joined
Dec 7, 2017
Messages
42
Reaction score
38
Location
Rome
Hardiness Zone
9b
Country
Italy
Honestly only the Catalogna chicory, the one in the middle, seems growing. The others are withering and I don't know if the problem is the winter temperature, the amount of water or something else. What do you think about it?
 
Joined
Oct 9, 2017
Messages
1,235
Reaction score
1,612
Location
Warrenton North Carolina
Hardiness Zone
7b
Country
United States
@Fagiolino are you using water from a central supply? If you are, this could be your problem. Many municipalities add chlorine and other chemicals while purifying the water. What are you using as soil? Is it from the yard or a commercial blend?
 
  • Like
Reactions: alp
Joined
Feb 2, 2016
Messages
1,803
Reaction score
2,024
Location
Colima, Mexico
Hardiness Zone
USDA Zone 11
Country
Mexico
First of all, thank you for the video:) I learned some new things and think i am going to give some a try. I have never tried growing plants inside, but some people who do may have some tips for you. When i moved to the tropics i thought i could grow most plants year around and i can and do. I have also noticed that even when the temps are nice and toasty in December and January the plants do like to "rest" during those months and if i am planting seeds in those 2 months, they are very slow to come up and most often wait for February to germinate. Possibly this may be part of the problem combined with the suggestions offered by @Silentrunning above.
.
 

alp

Joined
Mar 20, 2017
Messages
14,801
Reaction score
14,377
Location
Essex
Showcase(s):
3
Hardiness Zone
9b
Country
United Kingdom
@Silentrunning is right. Tap water is not good for plants. Do you keep fish in a little tank? That would be ideal for watering your plants. Perhaps only stick to winter crops like come and cut salad leaves, parsley. Try something more accommodating first to build up your confidence. Land cress is easy to grow in winter. Or Mizuna ..
 
Joined
Dec 7, 2017
Messages
42
Reaction score
38
Location
Rome
Hardiness Zone
9b
Country
Italy
Thank you all for your answers.Yes, I'm using tap water. My father used to take care of his vegetable garden using the tap water of my city, which is listed as one of the best in Europe.
It was a specific suggestion for me, because I'm trying to regrow vegetables or do you usually avoid watering your plants with tap water? Very interesting.
Unfortunately I don't have a fish. How about dechlorinate water? If I fill a jug with water, without covering it, over time, the chlorine in the water should not dissipate due to exposure to the sun and air?
As a soil I have to say I'm using a commercial one, so I can definitely improve. Even if for the first time in my life I used the expanded clay and I think it's very useful to enhance drainage.
I think the theory exposed by Beverly is very interesting as well (glad you appreciated the video!). Theoretically, if the plants don't die during the coldest months of the year, they could grow in the spring? Just to understand :)
How about covering the upper surface of the pot with cellophane? Is there any chance to create a micro-greenhouse?
p.s. thank you for suggesting me Land cress and Mizuna, never heard them. Looking forward to finding the seeds
 
Last edited:
  • Like
Reactions: alp
Ad

Advertisements

alp

Joined
Mar 20, 2017
Messages
14,801
Reaction score
14,377
Location
Essex
Showcase(s):
3
Hardiness Zone
9b
Country
United Kingdom
Using cellophane film to cover potted compost is one of the best ways to encourage seeds to sprout. The condensation from the film really helps germination unless it's too hot. I always use a plastic bag (no need to run up expense) to wrap up a pot with seeds in it and the sterile atmosphere, the warmth and the moisture (mustn't water too much - if tiny condensation drops appear overnight, it will work). Once you see seedlings, you can add a very weak feed. Any transparent plastic sheets from DIY stores will be useful.
 

alp

Joined
Mar 20, 2017
Messages
14,801
Reaction score
14,377
Location
Essex
Showcase(s):
3
Hardiness Zone
9b
Country
United Kingdom
If you like spring onion or scallion, try that as they grow in the cold as well.
 
Ad

Advertisements

Joined
Feb 2, 2016
Messages
1,803
Reaction score
2,024
Location
Colima, Mexico
Hardiness Zone
USDA Zone 11
Country
Mexico
I am not so sure about the cellophane over the soil of rooted plants. It works well germinating seeds, but i wonder about the possibility of mold. Soil needs a certain amount of oxygen and air flow and I'd like to hear what @Chuck and @Larisa have to say about this. If they are available, they will respond here.:)
 
Joined
Feb 2, 2014
Messages
8,630
Reaction score
4,018
Location
Tarpley Tx
Hardiness Zone
8b
Country
United States
I am not so sure about the cellophane over the soil of rooted plants. It works well germinating seeds, but i wonder about the possibility of mold. Soil needs a certain amount of oxygen and air flow and I'd like to hear what @Chuck and @Larisa have to say about this. If they are available, they will respond here.:)
Cellophane/saran wrap works great when starting seeds just as long as it DOSEN'T lay on the potting soil. If it does mold might become a problem. I use it for all of my seed starting but I always have about 1 inch of airspace between the soil and the cellophane and as soon as the seeds sprout I remove it. What cellophane does is retain moisture and increase heat. It acts like a minature green house.
 
Joined
Feb 2, 2016
Messages
1,803
Reaction score
2,024
Location
Colima, Mexico
Hardiness Zone
USDA Zone 11
Country
Mexico
Thank you @Chuck, but i believe we are talking about cellophane over the soil of already rooted plants. What do you think?
 
Joined
Feb 2, 2014
Messages
8,630
Reaction score
4,018
Location
Tarpley Tx
Hardiness Zone
8b
Country
United States
Thank you @Chuck, but i believe we are talking about cellophane over the soil of already rooted plants. What do you think?
Only outdoors and only stuff like black plastic to warm up the soil. I suppose it could be used as a weed preventer in cooler areas where the sun isn't intense.
 
Ad

Advertisements

Joined
Jan 6, 2016
Messages
1,135
Reaction score
2,543
Location
Russia , Moscow
Hardiness Zone
6 b
Country
Russian Federation
I am not so sure about the cellophane over the soil of rooted plants. It works well germinating seeds, but i wonder about the possibility of mold. Soil needs a certain amount of oxygen and air flow and I'd like to hear what @Chuck and @Larisa have to say about this. If they are available, they will respond here.:)
I use cellophane sometimes. But I make holes there and sometimes open for air. I now do not have my own photos, so I'll show similar ones. :)

Теплички-с-рассадой-земляники-нужно-регулярно-проветривать-и-вовремя-поливать.jpg


Also in winter, I collect plastic containers in which sell food here. I like this more. They have different sizes, large and small.

plastikovye-korobki.jpg
Таблетки-с-семенами-нужно-накрыть-крышкой-или-пленкой.jpg


I always make small holes in the lid. Then there is no mold or algae.
When the seeds grow sufficiently, I remove the lid.
i-5992.jpg


You can use even an ordinary water bottle.

55.jpg
 
Joined
Feb 2, 2014
Messages
8,630
Reaction score
4,018
Location
Tarpley Tx
Hardiness Zone
8b
Country
United States
I use cellophane sometimes. But I make holes there and sometimes open for air. I now do not have my own photos, so I'll show similar ones. :)

View attachment 30316

Also in winter, I collect plastic containers in which sell food here. I like this more. They have different sizes, large and small.

View attachment 30319 View attachment 30320

I always make small holes in the lid. Then there is no mold or algae.
When the seeds grow sufficiently, I remove the lid.
View attachment 30321

You can use even an ordinary water bottle.

View attachment 30323
I do exactly the same thing and when the seedlings emerge I sprinkle the soil with cornmeal to prevent damping off.
 
Joined
Jan 6, 2016
Messages
1,135
Reaction score
2,543
Location
Russia , Moscow
Hardiness Zone
6 b
Country
Russian Federation
I did not know about the use of corn flour. But now I'll try to use this too.
 
Ad

Advertisements

Joined
Feb 2, 2014
Messages
8,630
Reaction score
4,018
Location
Tarpley Tx
Hardiness Zone
8b
Country
United States
I did not know about the use of corn flour. But now I'll try to use this too.
Just make sure it is NOT the enriched kind that they sell in grocery stores here. Make sure it says Whole Ground or Stone Ground on the package. It is also sold and labeled as horticultural cornmeal.
 

Ask a Question

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

You'll need to choose a username for the site, which only take a couple of moments. After that, you can post your question and our members will help you out.

Ask a Question

Top