Trying again armed with supplements still getting BER?


S

saboken

I was having a serious issue with blossom end rot on my tomatos last year so I purchased a supplement the BER is not as bad as last year but I'm still loosing some tomatos to it? In north central Pennsylvania we have been getting a LOT of Rain! The tomatos in the self watering containers are what's affected. Any idea how to fix this calcium deficiency? Can I double up the recommend dose of the Cal Mag? I'm starting to think something could be in the well water because the plants that get mostly rain water are doing better not having to use the well water the past few weeks. See photos of what I'm using, the lime was for the self watering containers per the instructions and worked fine in South Carolina.
 

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BER is in most all cases, NOT a calcium deficiency. It is due to a plants inability to uptake the calcium that is already there. This inability to uptake is caused by a soil imbalance of calcium and magnesium. Where I live in Texas BER is a MAJOR problem. I cannot grow any tomatoes except cherry varieties without losing all of them to BER. But there is a simple solution. Just add Epsom Salts (Magnesium Sulfate) to the soil at planting and a couple of times during the growing season. In my soil, which is alkaline it is a 100% cure. It also works the same in the acid soils of East Texas.
 
S

saboken

BER is in most all cases, NOT a calcium deficiency. It is due to a plants inability to uptake the calcium that is already there. This inability to uptake is caused by a soil imbalance of calcium and magnesium. Where I live in Texas BER is a MAJOR problem. I cannot grow any tomatoes except cherry varieties without losing all of them to BER. But there is a simple solution. Just add Epsom Salts (Magnesium Sulfate) to the soil at planting and a couple of times during the growing season. In my soil, which is alkaline it is a 100% cure. It also works the same in the acid soils of East Texas.
Yeah I've been doing that also the Epsom salts don't seem to help. That's why I'm thinking something in the well we have a lot of fracking about us who knows what's seeping in? I use a RO system for my drinking and cooking maybe I should try the filtered water my system can make 100 gallons a day because it was originally purchased for a Salt water aquarium and I needed a lot of pure water for the salt mix.
 
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Yeah I've been doing that also the Epsom salts don't seem to help. That's why I'm thinking something in the well we have a lot of fracking about us who knows what's seeping in? I use a RO system for my drinking and cooking maybe I should try the filtered water my system can make 100 gallons a day because it was originally purchased for a Salt water aquarium and I needed a lot of pure water for the salt mix.
How much epsom salts are you using per plant?
 
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Did I read you use lime in the water plants? Lime is not directly useful as I understand, and in an artifical environment I am curious as to what would break it into the useful plant soluble form.
 
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About a tablespoon
No wonder it isn't working. I put a minimum of 2 handfuls each time I apply it. It is probably more than 1/2 cup each time and I apply it normally 3 times per season. Once at planting, once at bloom stage and once during fruit growth.
 
S

saboken

No wonder it isn't working. I put a minimum of 2 handfuls each time I apply it. It is probably more than 1/2 cup each time and I apply it normally 3 times per season. Once at planting, once at bloom stage and once during fruit growth.
Last year I went through 6 lbs of the stuff and it didn't work? These are in containers what I add could accumulate in the tank of containers.
 
S

saboken

Did I read you use lime in the water plants? Lime is not directly useful as I understand, and in an artifical environment I am curious as to what would break it into the useful plant soluble form.
The lime is put into the center of the soil to raise the PH it worked the first year in SC I had no issues grew some huge Cherokee Purples the only thing different is I'm 700 Miles north now I followed the container instructions exactly the same, again that's why I'm wondering if something is in the well water? Unless it's something that looks like BER I live in a very remote area.
 

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BER is in most all cases, NOT a calcium deficiency. It is due to a plants inability to uptake the calcium that is already there. This inability to uptake is caused by a soil imbalance of calcium and magnesium. Where I live in Texas BER is a MAJOR problem. I cannot grow any tomatoes except cherry varieties without losing all of them to BER. But there is a simple solution. Just add Epsom Salts (Magnesium Sulfate) to the soil at planting and a couple of times during the growing season. In my soil, which is alkaline it is a 100% cure. It also works the same in the acid soils of East Texas.
Perhaps you should consider changing your watering regime?
You should not have to use that much ES. to get what you need for tomatoes.
Irregular watering can also prevent the uptake of calcium; in fact it's overwhelmingly the major cause of BER in the uk.
When you water too much at one go, then leave to dry until wilted, you are asking for BER.
Water half as much, twice as often.
 
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S

saboken

Perhaps you should consider changing your watering regime?
You should not have to use that much ES. to get what you need for tomatoes.
Irregular watering can also prevent the uptake of calcium; in fact it's overwhelmingly the major cause of BER in the uk.
When you water too much at one go, then leave to dry until wilted, you are asking for BER.
Water half as much, twice as often.
The container is self watering it has a tank under a grid it's kinda hard to under or over water them, I just keep the tank full. It sure how to change that when It worked the first year I used them.
 
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S

saboken

They are outside and it has rained a lot there?
Yes but the soil is covered with some kind of fabric that came with the containers some rain can get through but it's not enough to keep the tank full each one took a Gallon and a half today and it rained 4 days straight and will probably again later today. The others that are in buckets are doing fine if it doesn't rain I have to give them about 1/2 a gallon a day or they dry out. This is why I'm baffled I had no issues In SC and it rained a lot down there.
 
S

saboken

The bucket ones have no drain holes? It sounds like your self watering containers are flushing out nutrients with the extra water
Yes they have drain holes they are not the issue only the one's in the self watering containers I use the well water to keep the tanks full that's why I'm thinking something is wrong with the water , I'm going to empty the tanks and use the RO water until I figure out how to collect rainwater, of that solves it I have to get my water tested probably move if something is bad in it. The other thing I forget the property owners spray some kind of herbicide on the back of the property it might be getting into the well? I posted a photo of what they killed off with some kind of green liquid. You can see what the stuff did, I won't complain to the owners they will just get pissed. The containers are on a Deck on the second floor so.tge spray didn't reach them, the buckets are closer to where they sprayed they are healthy.
 

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So I am getting the idea your container tomatoes have hot feet. They do not like that. The containers are 7 gallons or more or smaller than buckets? Buckets not covered and containers are, so evaporation cooling is slowed. High on deck where deck temps can easily go 125f. I dry herbs at 95f.
 
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S

saboken

So I am getting the idea your container tomatoes have hot feet. They do not like that. The containers are 7 gallons or more or smaller than buckets? Buckets not covered and containers are, so evaporation cooling is slowed. High on deck where deck temps can easily go 125f. I dry herbs at 95f.
I don't know how that possible I'm in Pennsylvania on the NY border it's not that hot here compared to 2 years ago when I grew them In the same containers in SC the summers are a lot longer and way hotter down there I'm at a elevation of 2100' compared sea level in SC. I rarely need AC here and have seen the temps drop to 45 during the night, but it hasn't had a frost in 2 1/2 months. Just checked the soil temperature it's 67.2 and hotter outside than it's been all month.
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S

saboken

Well now you are actually describing cold feet. All this impacts nutrient flow of course.
Guess I can't win I won't plant in the ground because of all the stuff they use trying to kill the weeds on the back half of the property, why they don't just rip it up and plant grass? They own a equipment rental company that has everything I think I need to o move lol
 
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