Trimming non-sucker limb on tomato plant question.


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Check out the Wytham wood study, It is run by Oxford University and has been going so long it has involved an awful lot of people, so agendas shouldn't have affected it too much. It is a SSI, very rural and the birds tend to stay local, so not affected by feeding. Well north, I noticed there was a study of their arrival and increase in Finland.

Regarding saving seed, someone did a study of immigrants who had brought veg. seed with them and grown on allotments over here. They had been saving seed and replanting for over ten years, and the researchers compared their plants to seed specially produced for the UK market by seed companies in recent years. The allotment guys far outperformed, it seems that a period of human selection has very definite results. Presumably you save seed from plants that grow well, after a few years you should have plants particularly suited to your local environment.

As to the germination, my guess is that you are more careful about selection and drying. If a commercial operation is looking to harvest and dry 100lbs of beans (say) they are not going to be too fussy so long as they hit a minimum germination rate.
It is, or was, a study which began with no agenda, but like every weather event which suits, has been hijacked to push the climate change agenda.
I'm not saying climate doesn't change, on the contrary, it's the norm, but, like I said previously, there are too many variables.
What else has happened since 1947?
2 things which immediately spring to mind are Dutch Elm Disease & Ash Dieback.
So what would the effect be if this had caused a thinning of tree density, allowing more sunlight through, would it be to warm lower layers of the forest, where birds breed?
Rotting wood is exothermic & harbours more insect life than healthy wood.
How much of an effect would an increased food source, available earlier in the year, have?

Also, there is the involvement of David Attenborough & he has been shown to be a climate fraud on a number of occasions, & I would touch anything he had with a bargepole.
 
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Meadowlark

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When I grow peas & beans, I try to save enough for seed, as I find I get far better germination from saved seed. Is THAT because the parent seed has, by growing, shown its suitability for the area & handed down that advantage to its off-spring? Is it just the handling or storage of the seed?
There are a number of variables.

Interesting discussion on seed saving. In my World, seed saving is becoming more and more important to me. Since COVID, I have experienced a significant decline in the utility and availability of commercial seeds. Germination rates significantly down both in % of germination achieved and in uniformity of germination time which is particularly important when home growing corn.

My motivation to save seeds is definitely increasing and I would like to learn more about techniques for a variety of different veggies.
 
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In the UK heirloom corn isn't really viable, apart from in the far South.
We have found one hybrid which is stable to Filial 3, & that is Swift F1, so I'd suspect others may be stable too.
Germination rates tend to be poor here too, hence the interest in saving.
When sowing corn, I put two seeds per module in a 15 cell insert. with a decent sowing medium.
On the day prior to sowing, I make smokewater, from woodsmoke bubbled through a bucket of water, using an aquarium aerator & an air stone. (I burn the wood on my greenhouse floor, which is concrete, & concentrates the smoke in the atmosphere.
I soak the seed kernels in this water overnight, & sow next day, using the smokewater again to water the growing medium.
Perhaps you may find this interesting, as it's also very good for tomatoes, onions & lettuce. Mays are grasses:
 

Meadowlark

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Fascinating article. I have never heard that before but don't doubt its effect. Seems it might be a bit difficult to apply KARS in the home garden, but it would very much apply to corn. It is important that each corn seed germinate at the same time so that pollination will occur later at roughly the same time. KARS application could help that significantly.

Very interesting, indeed.
 
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Fascinating article. I have never heard that before but don't doubt its effect. Seems it might be a bit difficult to apply KARS in the home garden, but it would very much apply to corn. It is important that each corn seed germinate at the same time so that pollination will occur later at roughly the same time. KARS application could help that significantly.

Very interesting, indeed.
If you can make smoke-water, & if you water your plants, you can apply KARS.
Apparently they are effective down to parts per billion.
 
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Apparently they are effective down to parts per billion.
The way him who 'does' down the road every Wednesday has a fire and smokes the place out if the wind is in the wrong direction I must have plenty in my soil already. Mind you he is more careful since the day the missus had sheets out on the washing line, she is a force to reckoned with. :)
 
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You have to find what works for you. I have been “pruning” this year and my plants seem healthier and are much more manageable. Im only tying up to poles .
My plan was to build a terrace system over my plants this year but was not very cost prohibitive and dumpsters on job sites seldom have any good pickings these days for scrap.

What I have been doing and I dont know how well it will work.
The larger suckers are getting some root hormone and getting put into pots. Will see what takes.
 

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