Tomatillos


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I have seen people use these tomato things in recipes on the food shows, but have never tasted them. What makes them different from a regular tomato, and are they easy to grow?
 
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They are easy to grow and a must have for certain Mexican dishes, sauces and salsas. They have a tart taste nothing like tomatoes and they don't get red, they just stay green with a brown paper husk. They are ripe when they fall to the ground although you can pick them earlier but not much earlier. You don't need to stake them but they grow about the same as tomatoes
 
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I ate them for the first time around a week ago. In my opinion they're awful:confused: I hated them. And no, they don't taste like tomatoes at all;)
 
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I grew them once in my tomato bed, they grew like weeds and they reseeded profusely, I was pulling up little tomatillo's for a year or two after that.

I tried to make a green sauce with them as one might make a salsa using tomatoes but it was not very good. I think I later read that the tomatillos need to be blanched or cooked a bit for best results.

"Green Sauce or Salsa Verde" is a staple around here in all the rolled taco shops and Mexican restaurants. I find it particularly good with quesadillas.
 
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Glad now that I know the difference - I had seen them in a Mexican recipe I was looking at making only in the last couple of weeks, and I thought to myself that obtaining them here would be a little difficult. Might have to wait until I'm living somewhere else where they're more easily available! Is there anything you could sub in their place in recipes do you think?
 
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Glad now that I know the difference - I had seen them in a Mexican recipe I was looking at making only in the last couple of weeks, and I thought to myself that obtaining them here would be a little difficult. Might have to wait until I'm living somewhere else where they're more easily available! Is there anything you could sub in their place in recipes do you think?
I don't know of anything similar
 
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Tomatillos are my specialty... but you never want to get the more acid ones, you are after the ones with a more neutral taste... the smaller they are the better. I've noticed that... so avoid the bigger ones! I will try to grow my own tomatillos in the Netherlands... hope it works! By the way... tomatillos are not the most versatile fruits ever... NOT AT ALL actually. But they are goof for several good sauce recipes... specially if you want to make green enchiladas or a darn good spicy sauce... But remember... less is more when it comes to tomatillos ;)
 
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I saw them in the market here, but I haven't eat them before or know what to do with them. I guess this summer I will venture to buy some, and look up for a recipe online.
 
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I have never actually made a recipe that calls for them, but I am sure I have probably had them in Mexican dishes over the years and never even knew it. I see them at the stores all of the time in the produce section, but have never had a reason to purchase them.
 
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I'm glad I stumbled upon this thread. I'm seriously thinking about growing these in my garden this year and now that I know that they don't need to be staked and highly productive....I'm Sold!!!
 

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