Thinning new plants tip


Pat

Joined
Oct 12, 2012
Messages
1,878
Reaction score
564
Location
Maryland
Country
United States
Gardening Tip of the Day from Burpee

  • It's sad to pull out baby seedlings but a garden needs "tough love" when it comes to thinning. Radishes are a classic example. Every seed seems to come up in just a few days. If you don't thin them to an inch apart within the first week after germination, stunted plants may result. The same holds for lettuce, green beans, beets, sweet corn and just about every vegetable planted from seed. Most of the extras can be pulled up, but with large seedlings like beans try cutting them off to avoid damaging nearby roots.

Sometimes we forget to thin out the new plants, thought this tip would help.
 
Ad

Advertisements

Joined
Oct 30, 2013
Messages
859
Reaction score
168
Location
Connecticut USA
It is hard to do but I drop them down in the soil so they are actually a part of the growing process - they give the gift of life to the remaining plants. Very necessary task if you want your plants to grow to their full potential.
 
Joined
Mar 26, 2013
Messages
2,863
Reaction score
1,204
Location
Port William
Showcase(s):
1
Country
United Kingdom
Snip extra plants at ground level with scissors rather than pulling them out.
This way there is no root disturbance for those remaining.
 
Joined
Sep 20, 2012
Messages
5,377
Reaction score
1,801
Hardiness Zone
7a
Country
Poland
For me, this is the hardest part of gardening. I feel so very sorry for all tiny plants that have to be pulled out. I hate it. Sometimes, I just can't force myself to do it, and I let them grow. As you can guess, my garden looks pretty messy;) I'm ashamed to confess it, but there are little weeds growing in my flower pots next to miniature roses. I can't help it, I love all plants!
 
Ad

Advertisements

Joined
Apr 30, 2014
Messages
51
Reaction score
8
Hardiness Zone
11b
Country
Philippines
Weeding is perhaps my main pet peeve when it comes to gardening, but it's an essential part of it. Thinning out plants, well... it breaks my heart but it's part of the process as well. We usually thin them out when they're around two to three inches in height. Just give them a little snip with the scissors and let them brown where they fall, a little fertilizer help.
 

Ask a Question

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

You'll need to choose a username for the site, which only take a couple of moments. After that, you can post your question and our members will help you out.

Ask a Question

Top