Sweet Corn


Meadowlark

Gardner, Angler, Adjunct Professor, and Rancher
Joined
Feb 5, 2019
Messages
1,135
Reaction score
958
Location
East Texas
Hardiness Zone
8
Country
United States
Home grown sweet corn is one of, if not the top tasting veggies my garden produces. It is just fantastic when eaten fresh from the garden or after fresh frozen for later consumption. The variety I use is the triple sweet Honey Select. I make three plantings from late March through mid-April that each produce about 100 ears of corn, sized to be easily processed.

It takes 200 seeds for each planting, a 16 ft long space with 4 rows in each with corn planted every 4 inches. Some fail to germinate, thinning takes out several, and acts of Nature get others normally resulting in about 100 ears of corn to eat from each planting. 100 ears requires us about two hours to process...pick, shuck, clean. par boil, remove from cob, and freeze. .

Just completed processing the second planting as shown below...two down and one more to go.


corn 2nd mid june.JPG
 
Ad

Advertisements

Joined
Feb 13, 2021
Messages
1,281
Reaction score
864
Country
United Kingdom
I tried it once long ago, perhaps there are modern varieties more suited to our climate, I see it being produced commercially here now, but then it comes down to a matter of space, sigh.
 

Meadowlark

Gardner, Angler, Adjunct Professor, and Rancher
Joined
Feb 5, 2019
Messages
1,135
Reaction score
958
Location
East Texas
Hardiness Zone
8
Country
United States
Well, I don't 100% keep them out but do limit the damage with a Spinosad spray on the silks. The damage isn't much and it does not affect the taste or safety of the corn. Much higher risk of ear damage due to squirrels which have no limits on their appetite for fresh corn. Fortunately, I have dogs which terrorize the squirrels so there is a balance there.

Corn is absolutely worth it...if you garden for taste. Nothing beats the taste of fresh garden corn.


spinosad.jpg
 
Joined
Mar 26, 2013
Messages
3,184
Reaction score
1,335
Location
Port William
Showcase(s):
1
Country
United Kingdom
I grow them some years.
Just put 24 plants in 2 weeks ago, starting to take off now.
Will harvest late-Aug/Sept. depending on the summer.
It's more a hobby grow than for yield.
Farmers here plant a lot of corn, through black mulch, but it's a special, non-sweet variety for cattle feed.
 
Joined
Feb 13, 2021
Messages
1,281
Reaction score
864
Country
United Kingdom
I have seen plenty of it grown as feed over a while, but more recently I have seen it in supermarkets labeled as grown here.
 
Ad

Advertisements

Joined
Feb 2, 2014
Messages
10,365
Reaction score
4,850
Location
Tarpley Tx
Hardiness Zone
8b
Country
United States
Well, I don't 100% keep them out but do limit the damage with a Spinosad spray on the silks. The damage isn't much and it does not affect the taste or safety of the corn. Much higher risk of ear damage due to squirrels which have no limits on their appetite for fresh corn. Fortunately, I have dogs which terrorize the squirrels so there is a balance there.

Corn is absolutely worth it...if you garden for taste. Nothing beats the taste of fresh garden corn.


View attachment 90826
I have been using Bt for the past few years. I soak the silk where it comes out of the husks and I get an almost perfect effect. Most years zero worms. I spray twice, once at first sight of silk and again at full silk. Back before the days of Bt and spinosad I used mineral oil twice also. Not as good a job as Bt but it still greatly reduced the number of damaged ears. I guess it smothered the eggs.
 

Meadowlark

Gardner, Angler, Adjunct Professor, and Rancher
Joined
Feb 5, 2019
Messages
1,135
Reaction score
958
Location
East Texas
Hardiness Zone
8
Country
United States
My goodness...what a vision...a field full of plastic. I guess the concept of cover cropping is foreign to them?
 
Joined
Feb 13, 2021
Messages
1,281
Reaction score
864
Country
United Kingdom
Indeed, grown through black plastic mulch.
I'd have thought the environmental cost of field full of plastic would justify importing it.
I was reading recently that the environmental transportation costs of imported out of season Spanish tomatoes are considerably smaller than those of heating English greenhouses.
 
Ad

Advertisements


Ask a Question

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

You'll need to choose a username for the site, which only take a couple of moments. After that, you can post your question and our members will help you out.

Ask a Question

Similar Threads


Top