Sulfur pest control


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Howdy.

I did some research on Sulfur as a pesticide for mites and arachnid type pests but couldn't find much about its effectiveness on aphids. I'm dealing with both pests and have been trying to look for a safe and inexpensive way to deal with them. I've also considered Imidacloprid based insecticide on the aphids but am concerned about its effect on beneficial insects like bees. The spider mites have covered my Chinese Fringe Flower with their tiny webs. The aphids are affecting my pansies and impatiens and possibly my newly sprouted Mimosa Pudica plants. I've used diatomaceous earth and neem oil in the past but haven't had much luck with those remedies.

Also, ants! I know from research that ant problems and aphid problems tend to coincide as ants are known to "farm" aphids for their honeydew excrements so I'm thinking ants are likely another key to the aphid problem.

I'd like to avoid harsh chemicals.

Any tips or advice would be appreciated.

Thanks.
 
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Sulfur has been used as a miticide and an insecticide for many decades. It was the old go to method but sulfur has fallen out of use because of two things. Its odor and its effectiveness. It will kill mites but it will not disrupt their reproductive cycles. A modern day gardener only needs 3 things to control any insect, caterpillar or mite except for adult grasshoppers and these are Bt (Bacillus thuringensis), spinosad, a soil borne bacteria and Neem Oil. Spinosad works better on insects than Neem but Neem works better on mites. The reason why you found Neem ineffective was probably because it's shelf life had expired. It lasts a maximum of 6 weeks. Neem mainly kills mites by suffocation and must be used regularly for them, about every 7 days. Mites have a complicated reproductive cycle and are just about impossible to eliminate with only one or two applications. Spinosad kill aphids but insecticidal soap such as Safer Soap works better. If you ever have caterpillars Bt is the killer of choice. Neem is also an effective aphid killer. As far as ants are concerned Spinosad is the best and really works well if you can find the ant mound and use the spinosad as a soil drench. All of the products are natural and harmless to people and pets. Except for the Bt these products should be used in the AM or late afternoon to avoid bees and other pollinators.
 
Joined
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Sulfur has been used as a miticide and an insecticide for many decades. It was the old go to method but sulfur has fallen out of use because of two things. Its odor and its effectiveness. It will kill mites but it will not disrupt their reproductive cycles. A modern day gardener only needs 3 things to control any insect, caterpillar or mite except for adult grasshoppers and these are Bt (Bacillus thuringensis), spinosad, a soil borne bacteria and Neem Oil. Spinosad works better on insects than Neem but Neem works better on mites. The reason why you found Neem ineffective was probably because it's shelf life had expired. It lasts a maximum of 6 weeks. Neem mainly kills mites by suffocation and must be used regularly for them, about every 7 days. Mites have a complicated reproductive cycle and are just about impossible to eliminate with only one or two applications. Spinosad kill aphids but insecticidal soap such as Safer Soap works better. If you ever have caterpillars Bt is the killer of choice. Neem is also an effective aphid killer. As far as ants are concerned Spinosad is the best and really works well if you can find the ant mound and use the spinosad as a soil drench. All of the products are natural and harmless to people and pets. Except for the Bt these products should be used in the AM or late afternoon to avoid bees and other pollinators.
I do have a bottle of Captain Jacks spinosad. Might try that and buy a new bottle of neem oil. Thanks.
 
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Joined
May 17, 2014
Messages
66
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70
Location
North Texas (DFW)
Country
United States
Sulfur has been used as a miticide and an insecticide for many decades. It was the old go to method but sulfur has fallen out of use because of two things. Its odor and its effectiveness. It will kill mites but it will not disrupt their reproductive cycles. A modern day gardener only needs 3 things to control any insect, caterpillar or mite except for adult grasshoppers and these are Bt (Bacillus thuringensis), spinosad, a soil borne bacteria and Neem Oil. Spinosad works better on insects than Neem but Neem works better on mites. The reason why you found Neem ineffective was probably because it's shelf life had expired. It lasts a maximum of 6 weeks. Neem mainly kills mites by suffocation and must be used regularly for them, about every 7 days. Mites have a complicated reproductive cycle and are just about impossible to eliminate with only one or two applications. Spinosad kill aphids but insecticidal soap such as Safer Soap works better. If you ever have caterpillars Bt is the killer of choice. Neem is also an effective aphid killer. As far as ants are concerned Spinosad is the best and really works well if you can find the ant mound and use the spinosad as a soil drench. All of the products are natural and harmless to people and pets. Except for the Bt these products should be used in the AM or late afternoon to avoid bees and other pollinators.
I went ahead and applied the spinosad. We shall see what happens.
 

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