Soil test

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Hey guys here is the soil test from one of my plots. It was taken last year. I did there recommendations and will retake this year to see if it improved at all. Is this much calcium in the soil a concern? Please dont laugh at the results. Any ways to get better soil quickly?
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The thing I'd be most worried about with high levels of calcium is the pH, and yours is just over 7 which is a little alkaline. I'd steer clear of lime, you don't want to make it any more alkaline. That being said, I don't know a massive amount about soil chemistry, there are others on here who are far more knowledgeable than me.

There's some useful info about soil pH here: https://www.rhs.org.uk/advice/profile?pid=239
 
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The thing I'd be most worried about with high levels of calcium is the pH, and yours is just over 7 which is a little alkaline. I'd steer clear of lime, you don't want to make it any more alkaline. That being said, I don't know a massive amount about soil chemistry, there are others on here who are far more knowledgeable than me.

There's some useful info about soil pH here: https://www.rhs.org.uk/advice/profile?pid=239
Thanks for your help. Think I should try and get the ph down? Like I said I'll retest this spring and see how it compares.
 

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Thanks for your help. Think I should try and get the ph down? Like I said I'll retest this spring and see how it compares.
It depends, what are you planning on growing?
 
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I'm not sure yet but there will definitely be tomatoes peppers cucumbers zucchini. There maybe onions and green beans. Haven't decided which garden the beans and onions are going in.
 
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Hey I am gonna stop y'all here on the seaweed. There is a common sales pitch that needs a little more understanding.

The most powerful and compelling reason to use seaweed is not the micronutrients. The dopeheads that really brought seaweed extracts to the market for their hydroponic operations appreciate the micros but that was not the real driver.

Some seaweeds contain all-All-ALL the phytohormones. Did I say all?
 
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Where can you get the blood?
Bloodmeal. Personally I would suggest composted cow manure instead. Bloodmeal is a high protein fertilizer where roughly 16% of the protein content is measured as nitrogen. It varies by material a little, but the soil secret is the protein and the other effects that protein has as a food source for the variety of life in the soil. The problem is that it is hot. VERY concentrated. You really do not want to overuse it as the overfeeding problems outweigh your good efforts sometimes. Fungi and other feeders come for it. So will insects. A good way to think about it is how much hamburger would you sprinkle about your plants to feed the soil?

So why is the copper so high? Fungicide?
 
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@Brian1985 can you zoom in on this map and tell me which soil type you see on your land and put you location on your profile so I can find climate data effecting that soil? I am just curious and find it interesting to read about. Btw a white paper I read on Cu indicated no problem with Cu up to 5 ppm but trouble when they tried to grow at 10ppm. I am curious about the S in your soil and the relatively high pH. There was a mention of soils with high carbonates or low rainfall or both having that condition. I was asking myself how to lower pH without using S in that soil.

The bloodmeal is a good suggestion for your situation, but when I ran loam soil through a Sulfur calculator it came back saying 18lbs per 1000 sf to lower the pH to 6.5-6.8. Given the high S in your report I wondered how the heck is that supposed to work out?
 
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I'm not sure on the soil type. I did have to use quite a bit of fungicide last year but the soil test was done way before the fungicide was used. I am located in a small town called cozad Nebraska. Very central part of the state.
 
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Dirt, Isn't the low level of Fe going to be even less available with Ph being so high? Is it possible that this is filled land? Or, brown belt land? Is there a stream nearby that is downstream from a mining area? This is a candidate for the charcoal part of Bone Char, except for the high P, otherwise charcoal sweepings if he can find it available?

For micro-elements, Menefee Humate or New Jersey Greensand is a good, long-term fix. Available at any farm supply.
 
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Not really honestly. But holdrefe is only about 45 mins southeast of me.
 
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LOL why did I make it complicated? Natural tendencies I guess. Looks like your town was named after the dirt! If it has a name it sure is easier to look up what others suggest as amendments.

COZAD SERIES

The Cozad series consists of very deep, well drained soils that formed in silty alluvium on stream terraces along the Platte River system in Nebraska. Slope is typically 0 to 5 percent, but ranges up to 11 percent on the terrace riser. Mean annual precipitation is 58 centimeters (23 inches) at the type location. Mean annual temperature is 11 degrees C (51 degrees F).
TAXONOMIC CLASS: Coarse-silty, mixed, superactive, mesic Typic Haplustolls

TYPICAL PEDON: Cozad silt loam on a 1 percent slope in a cultivated field. When described, the soil was moist throughout. (Colors are for dry soil unless otherwise stated.)

Ap--0 to 20 centimeters (0 to 8 inches); gray (10YR 5/1) silt loam, very dark grayish brown (10YR 3/2) moist; weak medium granular structure; slightly hard, very friable; neutral; abrupt smooth boundary.

A--20 to 30 centimeters (8 to 12 inches); gray (10YR 5/1) silt loam, very dark grayish brown (10YR 3/2) moist; moderate medium granular structure; slightly hard, very friable; neutral; abrupt smooth boundary. (Combined thickness of A horizon ranges from 7 to 20 inches.)

Bw--30 to 46 centimeters (12 to 18 inches); grayish brown (10YR 5/2) silt loam, dark grayish brown (10YR 4/2) moist; moderate fine and medium subangular blocky structure; slightly hard, very friable; neutral; clear smooth boundary. (5 to 12 inches thick)

C1--46 to 122 centimeters (18 to 48 inches); light brownish gray (10YR 6/2) very fine sandy loam, grayish brown (10YR 5/2) moist; massive; slightly hard, very friable; thin stratification; neutral; gradual smooth boundary.

C2--122 to 203 centimeters (48 to 80 inches); light brownish gray (10YR 6/2) very fine sandy loam, grayish brown (10YR 5/2) moist; massive; slightly hard, very friable; thin stratification; slight effervescence; slightly alkaline.

TYPE LOCATION: Buffalo County, Nebraska; one mile north and one mile west of Odessa, Nebraska; 30 meters (100 feet) west and 64 meters (210 feet) north of the southeast corner, sec. 29, T. 9 N., R. 17 W.

RANGE IN CHARACTERISTICS:
Soil moisture: The soil moisture control section is moist in some part from April to September;
Moisture regime: ustic
Depth to secondary carbonates: 25 to 122 centimeters (10 to 48 inches)
Thickness of mollic epipedon: 18 to 51 centimeters (7 to 20 inches)
Thickness of solum: 36 to 81 centimeters (14 to 32 inches)
Comment: buried soils are common

Particle size control section (weighted average)
Clay: 10 to 18 percent

A horizon:
Hue; 10YR
Value: 3 to 5 dry, 2 or 3 moist
Chroma: 1 or 2
Texture: typically is silt loam, but range from loam, fine sandy loam, silty clay loam, or very fine sandy loam
Reaction: slightly acid or neutral

Bw horizon: (BC horizon if present)
Hue of 10YR
Value: 4 to 6 dry, 3 to 5 moist
Chroma: 2 or 3
Texture: silt loam, loam, or very fine sandy loam
Reaction: slightly acid to slightly alkaline

C horizon:
Hue of 10YR
Value: 5 to 7 dry, 4 or 5 moist
Chroma: 2 or 3
Texture: silt loam or very fine sandy loam stratified with coarser and finer textured material. Some pedons have layers of stratified clayey to sandy material below a depth of 40 inches
Reaction: neutral to moderately alkaline

COMPETING SERIES: These are the Kenesaw and Lowry soils.
Kenesaw and Lowry soils are on uplands and formed in loess.

GEOGRAPHIC SETTING:
Parent Material: alluvium
Landform: stream terraces typically along streams or drains which have received recent sediments. Slopes: 0 to 5 percent, but the extreme range is 0 to 11 percent.
Mean annual precipitation: 48 to 74 centimeters (19 to 29 inches).
Mean annual temperature: 10 to 13 degrees C (49 degrees to 56 degrees F).

GEOGRAPHICALLY ASSOCIATED SOILS: These are the Gosper, Hall, Hobbs, Hord, and Wood River soils.
Gosper soils have a fine-loamy control section and an argillic horizon.
Hall and Hord soils have a thicker mollic epipedon.
Gosper, Hall, and Hord soils occur at a higher elevation.
Hobbs soils are stratified above a depth of 10 inches and occur at a lower elevation.
Wood River soils have a fine control section and an argillic horizon and occur at a lower elevation.

DRAINAGE AND SATURATED HYDRAULIC CONDUCTIVITY:
Drainage: well
Runoff: low or moderate
Saturated Hydraulic Conductivity: moderately high

USE AND VEGETATION: Most areas are cultivated and much of it is irrigated.
The main crops are corn, alfalfa, and sorghums.
The native grasses are big bluestem, switchgrass, little bluestem, and western wheatgrass.

DISTRIBUTION AND EXTENT: Central Nebraska and north central Kansas. The series is moderately extensive.

MLRA SOIL SURVEY REGIONAL OFFICE (MO) RESPONSIBLE: Denver, Colorado

SERIES ESTABLISHED: Buffalo County, Nebraska, June 1970.

REMARKS:
The diagnostic horizons and characteristics recognized in this soil are:
Mollic epipedon: 0 to 30 centimeters (0 to 12 inches) (Ap and A horizons).
Cambic horizon: 30 to 46 centimeters (12 to 18 inches) (Bw horizon).
Organic carbon: irregular decrease in content.
OSD Modification: C horizon some pedons have layers of stratified clayey to sandy material below 102 centimeters (40 inches).

Phases of this series that have been correlated include saline-alkali and wet substratum.
Cozad was in the fine-silty family, but laboratory data showed it to be coarse-silty.

10/3/02 PRF
Modified the classification to "Typic". This soil formed on stable stream terraces and no evidence of stratification is identified. Lab data supports a "regular" decrease in organic matter.

10/21/05 JCR
Changed permeability to KSAT

National Cooperative Soil Survey
U.S.A.
 
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So I found this pdf from the Nebraska extension system. Really interesting talk on Nebraska specific techniques for organic gardening. Eye opening talk on how cow manure compost might not be your best bet as it has a liming effect whereas other manure composts have an acidifying effect, even the use of acidifying mulches like pinestraw. Talks about mycorrizal strains specifically aimed at acidifying the soil naturally. Big file covering the whole state with different soil sub types but it does specifically go into details about your type of soil.

It looks like its a good soil generally and needs an inch per 6 inches down of the right kind (net acidifying) organic matter (maybe chicken manure?), an iron manganese zinc blend and boric acid. A little boron goes a long way. @headfullofbees was right on it, but the quantities on that inititial adjustment might weigh quite a bit based on the soil test numbers. An extract of seaweed might be best used in maintaining the soil where the actual seaweed or other source might get tilled in at first then you can go from there.

The parts per million is a standardizing ratio, which when calculated out can then be applied to cubic feet or mass of soil like 12x12x6deep weighs "X" grams, so use the number from "Y" grams of the targeted amendment range ppm minus what "Y" you have in the soil already.

Good read. I learned some things. Thanks!
 
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Hey I am gonna stop y'all here on the seaweed. There is a common sales pitch that needs a little more understanding.

The most powerful and compelling reason to use seaweed is not the micronutrients. The dopeheads that really brought seaweed extracts to the market for their hydroponic operations appreciate the micros but that was not the real driver.

Some seaweeds contain all-All-ALL the phytohormones. Did I say all?
Whilst in my youth I did try some mild recreational substances, really, I am. and have always been, a beer man, and decades passed between my use of these substances and my discovery of the horticultural benefits of seaweed.
Whilst what Dirt Mechanic states regarding phyto-hormones is undoubtedly true, it is also the case that seaweed picks up the minerals from the sea.
If anyone feels averse, for whatever reason, to using seaweed, nutrient miners, like comfrey, will both boost nitrogen and micronutrients, without adding much in the way of phosphate.
Bloodmeal will not just give you nitrogen, it will give you iron.
 
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Would horse manure be bad also? I was going to try putting a add on fb and craigslist to get a load of it in bulk
 
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Horse manure will lower your pH as it rots down if you broadcast it, but, because it is high in ureic nitrogen, it can be quite hot when fresh.
You could perhaps best use it next year.
 
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