Single Habanero plant with pale leaves among a group of healthy plants


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I've followed the same watering/fertilizing routine for each of the plants in my dedicated Habanero raised bed with great results, fertilizing with a 2-3-1 fish emulsion once every other week.

The only other thing I've applied, outside of regular watering, is blood meal shortly after transplanting the seedlings to help with light green leaves which seemed to have really helped, leaves have been big and dark green ever since.The affected plant also seems to be under-producing compared to the others.

Any thoughts / suggestions?
 

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The reason for this could be genetic, or it could be something in the soil beneath that particular plant - maybe something that was spilt there, or a rock under the roots? Maybe that yellow plant gets less sunlight?
Why not try moving it.... even if it`s just a foot or so away.
 
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I've followed the same watering/fertilizing routine for each of the plants in my dedicated Habanero raised bed with great results, fertilizing with a 2-3-1 fish emulsion once every other week.

The only other thing I've applied, outside of regular watering, is blood meal shortly after transplanting the seedlings to help with light green leaves which seemed to have really helped, leaves have been big and dark green ever since.The affected plant also seems to be under-producing compared to the others.

Any thoughts / suggestions?
I know you said you fertilized them equally but IMO the plant is probably suffering from nitrogen chlorosis. I say this because from the pictures the plants older leaves are the most affected and the problem is growing upward on the plant. There can be many reasons for this but the main reason is the root ball of the plant is somehow restricted or encircling thus making it difficult to water properly. I would also use Chelated Iron in case the problem is a lack of trace minerals which it very well could be.
 
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I know you said you fertilized them equally but IMO the plant is probably suffering from nitrogen chlorosis. I say this because from the pictures the plants older leaves are the most affected and the problem is growing upward on the plant. There can be many reasons for this but the main reason is the root ball of the plant is somehow restricted or encircling thus making it difficult to water properly. I would also use Chelated Iron in case the problem is a lack of trace minerals which it very well could be.
I'm thinking epsom salts/chelated Iron is a great idea, even if there isn't a trace mineral deficiency this won't hurt, and if it works then I've solved the problem. Definitely going to try this.

I didn't consider that obstructed root growth could be involved, but I'll make a note to check out the root system and the soil below it
 
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Quick update - I believe one of the factors at play regarding my plant issues is extremely acidic soil, and correspondingly high Aluminum levels. You may already be aware, but from what I've read, Aluminum is more soluble under acidic conditions; and high Al levels are toxic to plants.

The raised beds however are mostly screened loam brought in from a farm, mixed with compost, which is probably why most plants look so healthy. My best guess is that this plant's roots reached deeper into the native soil and got hit with resulting toxicity.

I'm attaching a picture of the test results in case anyone is curious - I just received this and haven't fully interpreted yet.
 

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Quick update - I believe one of the factors at play regarding my plant issues is extremely acidic soil, and correspondingly high Aluminum levels. You may already be aware, but from what I've read, Aluminum is more soluble under acidic conditions; and high Al levels are toxic to plants.

The raised beds however are mostly screened loam brought in from a farm, mixed with compost, which is probably why most plants look so healthy. My best guess is that this plant's roots reached deeper into the native soil and got hit with resulting toxicity.

I'm attaching a picture of the test results in case anyone is curious - I just received this and haven't fully interpreted yet.
The only thing I know about high aluminum content is that it is only in acidic soils and to raise the Ph one adds agricultural lime. I find it unlikely that the roots of only one plant are affected because of high aluminum. Before I did anything drastic I would wait until the growing season is over and make sure of the roots development. From what I see in the soil report is that you are low in macro-nutrients and really high in aluminum. Most of your micro-nutrients aren't that bad. I don't think your soil is the main problem though. I think it is fertiliation. I wouldn't use just 2-3-1. I would still use it but I would also use a higher ratio organic liquid such as HastaGrow (6-12-6) plus I would also add a poultry based granular fertilizer kept on the surface. Most soil tests only show what is in the soil, not what is available to the plants. For that you need and acid test. But IMO if you change the fertilization regimine and use Epsom Salts everything will be OK.
 
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