Shampoo Ginger Rhizome


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Hey guys
So recently my shampoo ginger plant died but i was able to retain the rhizomes. I plan to plant the rhizomes soon. My question is, do i need to remove the old stems completely or i can just let it be there? Will the stem grow further after potting? As you can see in the pic, a bud is there from where the new stem can grow but i was wondering if there is any use retaining the old stem. Maybe i should just remove it and let it callous? Any thoughts?
 

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alp

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https://homeguides.sfgate.com/grow-awapuhi-41310.html

I myself would remove diseased part of any rhizome. The stem doesn't look diseased and I would trim it off and plant it straight away following the method in the article. The other eye is more important to the rhizome and it looks promising!
 
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Thanks. By trimming, do you mean removing the entire stem from where it attaches to the rhizome? Or just trimming it short?
 
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My experience with this plant is limited, but from my observations you don't really need to dig up the rhizomes unless you want to or if you live in a very cold place (for storage during winter)-- I'm assuming that you don't live in a very cold area, correct if wrong.

I live in an area that can get down to about 20 deg F (-7 deg C), so about this time of year they start dying away, but return every spring -- I never dig up the rhizomes to protect them, it's a very hardy plant.

However, I have dug a few up and transplanted them and I never worried about how much of the stalk remained. The plant always grows back very quickly, provided the temps are warm and they have plenty of moisture.

I don't know why your plants died, but I'm inclined to believe it was not from disease, so I wouldn't be concerned with cutting off the entire stem, but probably wouldn't hurt either way.

I don't think these are very long-lived plants, so probably just died from age or possibly from lack of water, they need good amount of water.


BTW, where did you get your gingers from? And how long have you had them?
 
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My experience with this plant is limited, but from my observations you don't really need to dig up the rhizomes unless you want to or if you live in a very cold place (for storage during winter)-- I'm assuming that you don't live in a very cold area, correct if wrong.

I live in an area that can get down to about 20 deg F (-7 deg C), so about this time of year they start dying away, but return every spring -- I never dig up the rhizomes to protect them, it's a very hardy plant.

However, I have dug a few up and transplanted them and I never worried about how much of the stalk remained. The plant always grows back very quickly, provided the temps are warm and they have plenty of moisture.

I don't know why your plants died, but I'm inclined to believe it was not from disease, so I wouldn't be concerned with cutting off the entire stem, but probably wouldn't hurt either way.

I don't think these are very long-lived plants, so probably just died from age or possibly from lack of water, they need good amount of water.


BTW, where did you get your gingers from? And how long have you had them?
Well i was actually deceived by the shopkeeper, maybe because of his lack of knowledge. It was a roadside shop i bought the plant from. It had been only two days with me and it started to wither. I had no idea what this plant was and he told me water it once a month and just keep the root buried in sand. After i came to know through this forum that it is shampoo ginger, i researched on it and came to know how stupid the shopkeeper was. So basically i had never buried the rhizome technically. The plant died because of lack of water. Now that i know, i will replant the rhizomes and hopefully they will grow soon. And yes, you are right. I live in a tropical kind of climate.
 
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It would be a shame to loose them...they are beautiful. I wish I knew what they were!
 
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From a quick search through the internet, I believe they are ALL species of Ginger!
 
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