Rain for weeks grows BIG mushrooms & how to forage/identify Chanterelle mushrooms


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I feel very fortunate to be in part of the US that is receiving ample rainfall. In parts of country, such as California, are experiencing drought for months. On June 1st, urban water users in California, had to abide by the state's first ever mandatory water restrictions, by reducing consumption to 25 percent.
Even farmers found it more beneficial to start selling their water reserves instead of growing food!
Much of the food that is sold in the grocery store comes from California, and this could really hurt our country's food supply. This is just another reason we, the people, should take food into our own hands--strive to make the home garden the primary food source, forage wild edibles, and spread the seeds of fruit around the world.

Of course the persistent rainfall, here in Kentucky, is assisting in the growth of the squashes and melons. Below are photos of recent garden harvests, including recent photos of the growth of birdhouse gourds, squashes, and melons.




7/6/2015 garden harvest















































This rainfall has also promoted the growth of many mushroom varieties, such as boletes and chanterelles. We harvested chanterelles today from the woods in two different locations, along with a gallon of blackberries.

This mushroom, seen below, was incredibly impressive for its size. It was definitely a bolete, but we were unsure of the variety. We concluded that it was the Bitter bolete, which is classified as poisonous.



Chanterelle mushrooms are quite distinctive, even compared to their look-alike, the Jack-o lantern and false chanterelle. For example, chanterelle mushrooms grow individually spread out over a large patch of ground, whereas jack-o lanterns grow clustered. Chanterelles smell pleasantly fragrant like apricots, as many have suggested. The cap is convex and usually vase shaped. The gills are referred to as false gills because they appear to have lumpy folds instead of true gills. Chanterelles grow amongst the ground floor around oak trees and conifers. Where you know there is a grove of pines during the months of July and August, you will also find Chanterelle mushrooms. Another way to ensure you have collected Chanterelles, is by the spore print. Lay a mushroom facing down on a white sheet of paper, and within several hours you'll notice a pink spore print.


Chanterelle mushroom forage #1, July 9th 2015

For three weeks, James and I have dedicated much of our time to foraging berries around the yard and in the woods. With the extra berries we have started to make jelly. So far we have stored over 20 jars of jelly in the fridge. I hope to sell many of these at $4-5 for each half pint. When making the jelly, I strain the seeds from the blackberries so that I can throw the seed out for growing plants.


July 9th chanterelle forage #2


July 10th 2015 chanterelle forage

We are still unsure what these pink blackberries are called, but we are picking them to save for seed. I may stick each individual berry into a pot of soil.





Original post @ Rain for weeks grows BIG mushrooms & how to forage/identify Chanterelle mushrooms


-Cassie Kinney, Vegans living off the land
 
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zigs

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Cor, love Chanterelles, don't usually get them till September here
 
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What a fantastic grow of vegetables and I found the mushrooms interesting! Now, I know what Chanterelles mushrooms looked like, and the Bolete mushroom!

My sister lives in Santa Barbara and she said her grass turned brown and they are under restriction for water usage. I am in Michigan, and it has been raining every other day here this summer. With rain, my lawn grew some sort of mushrooms that look like the Bolete, some are white and some are brown in color. The dog ate some when I didn't look, and threw up for three days. I am taking these mushrooms are poisonous!
 
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[QUOTE="IcyBC, post: 59491, member: 1844"The dog ate some when I didn't look, and threw up for three days. I am taking these mushrooms are poisonous![/QUOTE]All kinds of mushrooms are bad news for dogs, or so I've read.
 
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IcyBC said:
What a fantastic grow of vegetables and I found the mushrooms interesting! Now, I know what Chanterelles mushrooms looked like, and the Bolete mushroom!

My sister lives in Santa Barbara and she said her grass turned brown and they are under restriction for water usage. I am in Michigan, and it has been raining every other day here this summer. With rain, my lawn grew some sort of mushrooms that look like the Bolete, some are white and some are brown in color. The dog ate some when I didn't look, and threw up for three days. I am taking these mushrooms are poisonous!




Re: Santa Barbara, Those who use precious water to maintain their lawns during a drought, sorry for this crass quote, are now called "grassholes".
 
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@R.R. You are right about mushrooms with dogs! I have read so many articles too, so now I have to keep an eye out after the rain and have to get those mushrooms before the dog.

@CanadianLori Haha..I will have to tell my sister that and she can use that "grassholes" to call those that maintaining their green lawn :)
 
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This is a very impressive harvest!:D
I love mushrooms, but I'm scared of picking them myself. Too many of them are poisonous:(
 

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