Question about strawberries


Joined
Jun 12, 2022
Messages
3
Reaction score
0
Location
New York
Country
United States
I am new to gardening.

I planted some seeds in my yard about two weeks ago (I know it is late in the season; I got a late start). Some things (e.g. beans) began to sprout up. But the strawberry seeds have not. They are Mignonette Apline strawberries.

I also planted some in the little tiny pots/containers for planting seeds (to be transferred to yard or bigger pot later).

None have sprouted yet.

I read somewhere that strawberry seeds need to be kept in freezer for several weeks prior to planting. Does that apply to pre-packaged seeds too? If so, how long do they need to be in freezer? And will they not grow at all if I take them out (of freezer) too early?

I also got some store-bought organic strawberries at the supermarket. Would I be able to plant those now or do they need freezing?

I'm sorry for the silly questions. I am new to this.

Thank you.
 
Ad

Advertisements

Joined
Feb 2, 2014
Messages
10,153
Reaction score
4,748
Location
Tarpley Tx
Hardiness Zone
8b
Country
United States
Strawberries must have what is called stratification or a chilling period. The chilling period for strawberries is about 4 weeks at close to 40F in a damp environment. Most folks use the bottom of a refrigerator. I have never seen packaged seeds that didn't need stratification. I have never planted a fresh strawberry but I doubt it would germinate
 
Last edited:
Joined
Feb 13, 2021
Messages
944
Reaction score
699
Country
United Kingdom
I have never planted a fresh strawberry but I doubt it would germinate
I have done it with alpine strawberries. I don't see why not with store bought. I just flattened the little alpines, but I'd scrape the seeds off the outside of the big ones and lay them on the surface. I don't know how true they would come to the parent, most are hybrids of some sort.
 
Joined
Jun 12, 2022
Messages
3
Reaction score
0
Location
New York
Country
United States
I have done it with alpine strawberries. I don't see why not with store bought. I just flattened the little alpines, but I'd scrape the seeds off the outside of the big ones and lay them on the surface. I don't know how true they would come to the parent, most are hybrids of some sort.
Apline strawberry seeds is what I have.

I don't mind/care if they don't come out looking exactly like they're "supposed" to.

I just planted them in little tiny "pots" (made of fiberous/degradable material) with soil, around 1/8 inch deep.

I also planted some other directly in the soil.

(I did not put them in cold for 4 weeks as was suggested above).

It says it takes 14-28 days to germinate and it has not been that long yet. But if I am doing it wrong, can you briefly sum up how you did it? Is it do-able without special tools/machines?

---

I also have store-bought regular strawberries (with seeds, obviously). Been in my freezer for a day. But if there is any chance of them growing w/o the "cold treatment," I'd like to try and germinate at least a few now (and keep the rest in the freezer). But if it would be pointless, then of course I won't do it.

Sorry for the silly beginner/noob questions, guys. Thanks for the replies!
 
Ad

Advertisements

Joined
Feb 13, 2021
Messages
944
Reaction score
699
Country
United Kingdom
it was a while ago, but as I remember I laid them on the surface rather than putting them in the soil, I might have put some transparent plastic over them to keep them damp until they showed signs of life. They were not difficult, and when I had planted some in a window box where birds could get at them they popped up all over the garden. 1/8 of an inch deep is not good, they need light to germinate, use damp compost and scatter them on the surface then press them in a bit. If I were trying with a full size strawberry I would scrape the outside off and smear it across the compost, as you probably realise the seeds are on the outside, but if you know anyone with a strawberry plant it is much easier and quicker to grow on runners, alpine ones don't produce runners, but wild English strawberries do.

They say in the 1600's when the King of France sent James II the new hybrids we grow today he was impressed, but still had his gardeners plant out 300 runners of English strawberries, the flavour of the small ones is much more intense, and if you are a King and don't have to do the work yourself ...

With new strawberry plants they say take all the flowers off the first year and you will get more than twice as many fruits the second year. When I have moved to a new garden and taken runners with me I have always taken twice what I need and taken the flowers off half of them and kept them in pots, that way I still get some strawberries, and I give away the plants afterwards. I plant out half a dozen new plants each year and take out half a dozen old plants after four years, they won't produce much after that. That means six plants I take all the flowers off and eighteen producing, it's quite a lot , but we like them. Don't be greedy, take the strongest runners from the best producing plants and cut and bin the rest as early as possible so they are not drawing strength from the plants
 
Joined
Oct 7, 2021
Messages
163
Reaction score
82
Location
Massachusetts
Country
United States
it was a while ago, but as I remember I laid them on the surface rather than putting them in the soil, I might have put some transparent plastic over them to keep them damp until they showed signs of life. They were not difficult, and when I had planted some in a window box where birds could get at them they popped up all over the garden. 1/8 of an inch deep is not good, they need light to germinate, use damp compost and scatter them on the surface then press them in a bit. If I were trying with a full size strawberry I would scrape the outside off and smear it across the compost, as you probably realise the seeds are on the outside, but if you know anyone with a strawberry plant it is much easier and quicker to grow on runners, alpine ones don't produce runners, but wild English strawberries do.

They say in the 1600's when the King of France sent James II the new hybrids we grow today he was impressed, but still had his gardeners plant out 300 runners of English strawberries, the flavour of the small ones is much more intense, and if you are a King and don't have to do the work yourself ...

With new strawberry plants they say take all the flowers off the first year and you will get more than twice as many fruits the second year. When I have moved to a new garden and taken runners with me I have always taken twice what I need and taken the flowers off half of them and kept them in pots, that way I still get some strawberries, and I give away the plants afterwards. I plant out half a dozen new plants each year and take out half a dozen old plants after four years, they won't produce much after that. That means six plants I take all the flowers off and eighteen producing, it's quite a lot , but we like them. Don't be greedy, take the strongest runners from the best producing plants and cut and bin the rest as early as possible so they are not drawing strength from the plants
I might have to try this method. I have no idea how “old” my strawberry plants where when I planted them this spring.
They are growing well but only a few flowers and the fruit does not mature. I have lots of runners

So im not sure if I should de head the blooms and runners or let the runners spread to make “new” plants and de head all blooms for the rest if the season.
I have been feeding with Berry Tone
 
Joined
Feb 13, 2021
Messages
944
Reaction score
699
Country
United Kingdom
For strawberries remove the runners, for new plants stand a pot of soil next to the plant and peg the runner down to it at the first plant, remove the smaller ones that continue down the runner. They will root very quickly, then just snip them free. I would do about twice as many as you want and take all the flowers off half of them when you plant out next year in a new bed. That way you will still get some strawberries next year. If you are short of runners you can take more than one plant from each, but the first one will always be the biggest and the best, and of course, take the runners from the better plants if you can. My strawberry bed gradually moves across the garden, I take out six old plants one side each year and put in six new ones the other so I have twenty four plants producing, the oldest of which go once they have fruited, and six without flowers.
 
Ad

Advertisements

Joined
Oct 7, 2021
Messages
163
Reaction score
82
Location
Massachusetts
Country
United States
For strawberries remove the runners, for new plants stand a pot of soil next to the plant and peg the runner down to it at the first plant, remove the smaller ones that continue down the runner. They will root very quickly, then just snip them free. I would do about twice as many as you want and take all the flowers off half of them when you plant out next year in a new bed. That way you will still get some strawberries next year. If you are short of runners you can take more than one plant from each, but the first one will always be the biggest and the best, and of course, take the runners from the better plants if you can. My strawberry bed gradually moves across the garden, I take out six old plants one side each year and put in six new ones the other so I have twenty four plants producing, the oldest of which go once they have fruited, and six without flowers.
I will give it a go. I have never really had a good crop i have 14 plants now and 2 varieties.
Thank you.
Now to round up some pots for the runners. I just gave all mine away !
 

Ask a Question

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

You'll need to choose a username for the site, which only take a couple of moments. After that, you can post your question and our members will help you out.

Ask a Question

Top