Potatoe questions


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Hello,
Question 1) Last year I grew some spuds, the leafy foliage had round poisonous berry's. Is it ok to plant these berries? Or will they give poisonous potatoes?
Question 2) Planting supermarket potatoes that have gone to seed; just how poisonous can the potatoes be that come from them?
Question 3) What variety of spud do I choose to plant, for an on going add infinitum crop?

Thank you
Bear
 
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Although the veg garden is not really my department in our garden, I do know that the best way is to buy seed potatoes for the job, but supermarket ones that have gone to seed will work perfectly well. I would leave the seed pods (berries) if I were you. The only way to clone the potatoes is to use the actual tubers. Although the seed pods are poisonous, they will germinate and contain lots of seeds but some of the resulting potatoes could be poisonous.
There are lots of different varieties to choose from - start with one you especially like. If buying tubers from a Garden centre, they usually have a fair description of the varieties there.
 
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Thank you for your quick reply.
I don't know if it's true, but I'm sure I read somewhere, that in the cross matching of potato types, there were poisonous varieties. But growers kept on crossing until they got their desired result. And the growing of supermarket spuds gone to seed could be dangerous, as we could be growing one of those genetic throw backs to one of those earlier poisonous variety's.

Can anyone shed some light?
 
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Bear, forget the "seeds." Get seed potatoes from a garden center or on-line, chit them (cut them into pieces with each piece having at least two eyes or sprouting starts) and plant them.
No worry about being poisoned, and you can eat your own fresh potatoes with confidence.
 
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Got it, don't plant seeds, lol.
Yea, I know I can buy seeding spuds, but when I have old supermarket spuds here calling out to be used.....
 
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Got it, don't plant seeds, lol.
Yea, I know I can buy seeding spuds, but when I have old supermarket spuds here calling out to be used.....
Like Sirens calling sailors onto the rocks.
You will not be happy if your supermarket potatoes give your soil some disease which means you cannot grow potatoes again,
 
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Superstitious lot :)

Disease caused by pesticides etc? How about if the spuds were supermarket organic?
I'm not trying to be awkward, just self sufficient, as in the future we will have to be.

I have been watching the economy of the west for years, even bought economics books lol. Anyhow doom and gloom. Which is why I started growing food. I could tell you more but I won't, as folks who are comfy on the tracks don't want to be told there's a train comming (Friedrich Nietzsche, Albert Einstein, fellow spud bashers). :)
 
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When people try to help you with good advice and you call them a superstitious lot, you might just find that you won`t actually get much more advice in the future. I won`t bother.
 
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Hmmm.No offence meant but perhaps a little help here.
Firstly the green berries, certainly are not the best or even a worthwhile means of growing potatoes.
Secondly. The potatoe belongs to the Solanum family which is poisonus. Not that I have ever heard of anyone attempting to eat, or for that matter, feed the hulms, to animals. In fact. The newly produced spuds, should be clear of any greenness. Before cooking, all green should be peeled off the tuber.
Thirdly. Spuds that have been purchased from the green grocer or the supermarket, that have sprouted. These can be planted and will produce a crop.
Fourth. Where in the world has this idea come from. That tubers apart from those sold as certified seed potatoes, will poison your land. In any case, with gardening, and especially veg growing. Crop rotation should be practiced. Hope this helps.
 
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When people try to help you with good advice and you call them a superstitious lot, you might just find that you won`t actually get much more advice in the future. I won`t bother.
Sailors are a superstitious lot! The fact that I included a smile should tell you I was not being malicious.
 
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Meadowlark

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Where in the world has this idea come from. That tubers apart from those sold as certified seed potatoes, will poison your land. In any case, with gardening, and especially veg growing. Crop rotation should be practiced. Hope this helps.
Sounds like one of those "urban myths" :D

I do agree with you on rotations.... only potatoes need at least two years and three years is better preferably with a legume N2 fixing crop in the rotation.
 
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I've never heard of poison potatoes other than the green areas might give one a belly ache. Just like green tomatoes.

I've been planting grocery store seed taters for a few years. While my harvest hasn't been great, that's more likely a soil condition problem. Right now I have about 50 sprouts ranging from a couple inches to a foot. I have a couple random plants that I missed when moving the planting location.
 
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My web stats attracted me here. My site (Cultivariable) is linked above.

Your odds of getting a dangerously poisonous potato from the seeds of domesticated potatoes are very low. Any that are poisonous would be immediately recognizable by their bitterness and adults would have to eat a lot before even minor symptoms like diarrhea kick in. There are quite a few potato breeding hobbyists out there, testing out hundreds or thousands of new seedlings each year, and I've never heard of a single one landing in the hospital. The only place where you would want to exercise some caution would be feeding untested varieties to children, since they might not recognize the bitterness and smaller body size makes them more vulnerable to poisoning of all sorts. But if you taste the potatoes first, nothing to worry about.

Supermarket potatoes, or any other potatoes, can become poisonous when exposed to sunlight (greening or becoming darker purple if blue), when fed upon by insects, or when diseased. These conditions tend to intensify the glycoalkaloid concentration up to a limit imposed by the variety. Some can develop higher concentrations than others, so there are potatoes that can become green and remain safe, while others can become bitter and cause illness if eaten in large amounts.

The problem with planting your own potatoes over and over is disease. This is particularly true with supermarket potatoes. Certified seed potatoes are grown in programs with pretty tight tolerances for disease in the tubers, but even they still pass some viruses that get worse over time. Supermarket potatoes have no limits on disease and they almost always carry viruses. Some will also carry fungal or bacterial diseases. In some cases, these diseases are effectively permanent in your soil. For example, if you introduce powdery scab from a grocery store tuber, you'll have it forever because it lives in soil organisms that feed on the potatoes. They persist for years after you stop growing potatoes. The tolerance for powdery scab in certified seed is very low, so it is much less that you would introduce it that way. Viruses are also difficult to eradicate because they live in the tubers and potatoes tend to volunteer readily, meaning that your new crop is frequently exposed to the old plants. Many potato viruses are transmitted by aphids, which can easily carry them farther than most people would rotate their plantings. People tend to experience a loss in yield over time and do not recognize that the problem is the accumulation of viruses in the potatoes.

As for growing from seeds, it is not practical for most people, but it is a lot of fun and it is much easier to turn out good varieties than the conventional gardening book wisdom would have you believe. If you already have some seeds, why not grow them? One major practical advantage of true potato seeds is that they rarely transmit disease, so if you select your own varieties from seed and don't expose them to store bought potatoes, you can grow them productively much longer, since they will stay disease free until something is carried on the wind into your garden. If you find it interesting and you are on Facebook, check out the Kenosha Potato Project, where a lot of hobby potato breeders congregate.

You might also find these useful:
Potato glycoalkaloid toxicity: https://www.cultivariable.com/potato-glycoalkaloid-toxicity/
About potato berries: https://www.cultivariable.com/potato-what-you-should-know-about-fruits-on-your-potato-plants/
Basics of growing potatoes from true seed: https://www.cultivariable.com/the-absolute-beginners-guide-to-true-potato-seed-tps/
 
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Superstitious lot :)

Disease caused by pesticides etc? How about if the spuds were supermarket organic?
I'm not trying to be awkward, just self sufficient, as in the future we will have to be.

I have been watching the economy of the west for years, even bought economics books lol. Anyhow doom and gloom. Which is why I started growing food. I could tell you more but I won't, as folks who are comfy on the tracks don't want to be told there's a train comming (Friedrich Nietzsche, Albert Einstein, fellow spud bashers). :)
I'm not what you would call superstitious (touch wood) I would concede, however, to being ultra careful with my soil.
Nor am I averse to saving a pound.
I do that by saving my own seed potatoes, seed garlic. By doing so, I am not bringing any of the worst fungal diseases onto my plot.
I grow onions from seed too, as I've seen the ravages of white rot.
Cutting corners becomes a culture, & you can pay a heavy price.
 

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