Poison ivy removal operations under way!


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Toxicodendron radicans...aka Poison ivy. It's armament is defensive in nature, though it is A VERY offensive plant. Urishoil causes severe rash and itching in most of the population. Even a tiny amount can cause a reaction.

It must be removed... With extreme prejudice. Frequently found hiding along Virginia creeper, this too must go.

Because I'm hyper sensitive to the stuff, I have to choose my armament carefully. In all instances, within an hour of suspected contact I wash with a washcloth and Dawn dish soap... Twice. Then a third wash with my normal shower soap. Every. Time. Take no chances! I also choose full body covering using tyvek chem suits and long rubber gloves that all get disposed after use.
IMG_20181002_153716436.jpg



Phase one: Arial bombardment. This is targeted, since the chemical in use is pretty nasty. This is after one round and about 4 days. A second bombardment was conducted.

Offensive weaponry consists of round up poison ivy and brush killer.
IMG_20181002_153241252_HDR.jpg
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Here is the main bed in Jeopardy. After the RU had had a chance to work, I will clear the rest of the ground with a solution of 30% vinegar.
IMG_20181002_153210734.jpg


I have debated if I am going to pull up the dead vegetation first, or just apply weed cloth over it and mulch. Pulling it would be cleaner, but it poses significant risk to myself. Covering it allows the urishoil to remain there, but it is not exposed and should lose it's potency after a season or so as long as the plant is dead ( yes, you can still get rash from a dead plant months after it's demise!). I may go that route with a heavy layer of mulch. Working on a full tyvek suit is no fun (but better than a rash!) On the coolest of days, and we don't get many of those here!
 
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I have done that stuff..This building is where we loved for 17 years. It was full of poison ivy. One day I looked like, you covering up, and pulled all of it off the building and then cut all of it off except about 3 feet of the plant, and then sprayed what I didn't cut off the main stem with poison ivy stuff. It tried to come back for months. The building was built in 1760 and the ivy probably was there for a hundred years. I did get rid of it in the end. You must keep at it when it just shows it's face...

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Toxicodendron radicans...aka Poison ivy. It's armament is defensive in nature, though it is A VERY offensive plant. Urishoil causes severe rash and itching in most of the population. Even a tiny amount can cause a reaction.

It must be removed... With extreme prejudice. Frequently found hiding along Virginia creeper, this too must go.

Because I'm hyper sensitive to the stuff, I have to choose my armament carefully. In all instances, within an hour of suspected contact I wash with a washcloth and Dawn dish soap... Twice. Then a third wash with my normal shower soap. Every. Time. Take no chances! I also choose full body covering using tyvek chem suits and long rubber gloves that all get disposed after use.
View attachment 45890


Phase one: Arial bombardment. This is targeted, since the chemical in use is pretty nasty. This is after one round and about 4 days. A second bombardment was conducted.

Offensive weaponry consists of round up poison ivy and brush killer.
View attachment 45891 View attachment 45892

Here is the main bed in Jeopardy. After the RU had had a chance to work, I will clear the rest of the ground with a solution of 30% vinegar.
View attachment 45893

I have debated if I am going to pull up the dead vegetation first, or just apply weed cloth over it and mulch. Pulling it would be cleaner, but it poses significant risk to myself. Covering it allows the urishoil to remain there, but it is not exposed and should lose it's potency after a season or so as long as the plant is dead ( yes, you can still get rash from a dead plant months after it's demise!). I may go that route with a heavy layer of mulch. Working on a full tyvek suit is no fun (but better than a rash!) On the coolest of days, and we don't get many of those here!
In your honor I changed my Avatar to the most unusual gardening picture I have ever seen!

You can have it back after I parade it around a bit!
 
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In your honor I changed my Avatar to the most unusual gardening picture I have ever seen!

You can have it back after I parade it around a bit!
I though about putting on the gas mask, just for effect. But it was 90 deg out still and I just couldn't bring myself to do it! The door at least did something for me!!
 

MaryMary

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Even a tiny amount can cause a reaction.

It must be removed... With extreme prejudice

My dad was so sensitive to it, he couldn't walk downwind of it certain times of the year. He'd catch oils on the breeze from 30 feet. :eek:



In your honor I changed my Avatar to the most unusual gardening picture I have ever seen!

You can have it back after I parade it around a bit!


animated-smileys-laughing-041.gif
Love it!
 
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On to phase two. Carpet bombing! The precision strikes are having good effects, but we need to clear away the undergrowth that's hiding our nemesis. Instead ofa bunch of shade dwellers, we are going to mulch heavily so we can see any unwanted growth coming up and kill it without risking the desirables. There will only be some alocasia and a few Canna toward the edges.

I used this 30% vinegar solution adding about a half gallon of water and about 12oz of the 75% to bring the concentration back up. Hind sight I should have just bought more of the 30. But I didn't.

Anyway, the entire yard smelled like a plate of fish n chips the rest of the day, hopefully it's effective. I've got three little ones to myself for the time so I have been out to check on it. Planning on another round tomorrow maybe and then mulch next weekend. Still undecided on the weed barrier, there is already an old layer down there on party of it, but this stuff has grown over it.

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I sprayed the vinegar solution Friday. So far I see very little, to no effect. I'm a bit disappointed as many reviews claim vegetation died the next day. I'll add a bit of dish soap on the next round. Hopefully this works, because the next stop is a ground clear chemical solution.
 
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Sorry, Micheal kinda showed me down a bit. Still minimal effect with the vinegar solution. Although some weeds were killed to the ground, others appear unphased. I went after it with some ground clear and honestly don't see much better results.

The possibility ivy killer is working well in the ivy though. Most of that appears dead to the point the leaves are all but gone. At least the one I can see. There was one large tree with a lot of bush type poison ivy. That tree fell to Micheal, so now I'm trying to figure out how to get in there without getting up to my elbows in the itchy stuff.
 
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Sorry, Micheal kinda showed me down a bit. Still minimal effect with the vinegar solution. Although some weeds were killed to the ground, others appear unphased. I went after it with some ground clear and honestly don't see much better results.

The possibility ivy killer is working well in the ivy though. Most of that appears dead to the point the leaves are all but gone. At least the one I can see. There was one large tree with a lot of bush type poison ivy. That tree fell to Micheal, so now I'm trying to figure out how to get in there without getting up to my elbows in the itchy stuff.

Are you applying the vinegar at dusk? I had good results when I applied it late so that it didn’t evaporate so quickly.
 
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So the battle continues. You will eventually get the better of it. (y)

Strangely it was the new Roundup without glyphosate I was checking out. They have used vinegar instead?
I'll not sure what they use. I have used both vinegar and round up now. I'm pretty sure the one I had was glyphosate. I also used a baer product targeting only the PI and that was effective. I'm trying to clear the ground in the large beds that was hiding more PI. That is proving more difficult to clear than I expected using both vinegar (around or slightly above 30%) and ground clear.
 

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