plants to grow between walkway stones

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We have a paving stone walkway, and patio, and I want to have something low growing to start in the spaces between the stones. The patio has more space between the stones - 1/2 to 3/4 inch, and the walkway much less, of course. They are both in full sun, so moss is unfortunately not an option, although it'd be my first choice. I tried scotch moss, but I don't really like it, so far anyway. I was thinking of maybe creeping thyme. Any suggestions would be greatly appreciated! We're USDA zone 4 here, so it'd have to be something pretty hardy.
 
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Thyme is a good option, I think. You could also try low growing hardy annuals by scraping out some soil and scattering in the seeds.
 
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How about Ajuga? In my opinion it looks really beautiful:

DETA-1433.jpg


If you one to plant thyme, don't get the common one because it might grow quite tall. A matting thyme will be a better choice.
 
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I was thinking thyme too. I started some from seed this year on another part of the yard, so I'll see how it fares, and maybe get another packet or two of seeds for next spring.

Claudine, the Ajuga is gorgeous. I'm not familiar with it - do you know what zone it's hardy to?
 
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I grow Ajuga in the UK and it's very hardy. They'll cope with full sun - the coloured leaved forms will look especially good. They can get mildew if too dry though. If that happens you can cut them right back and water and they'll regrow.
 
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How about Ajuga? In my opinion it looks really beautiful:

DETA-1433.jpg


If you one to plant thyme, don't get the common one because it might grow quite tall. A matting thyme will be a better choice.
Wow, this is really beautiful and I think a perfect choice between the patio stones. Thanks for the information on the thyme, I didn't realize there was a difference in the height of the plants.
 
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I'm glad that you like it. I really love the plant, it looks so romantic. Somehow, I'm not sure why, it reminds me of one of my favorite books, Wuthering Heights:)
 
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You are absolutely right - it looks like a moor-type plant! Do you also like the song by Kate Bush? I love it - it sounds so right for Cathy
 
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My mother loves the song, so when I was a child I had to listen to it all the time;) . But I agree, it's really nice. I prefer the book though, I'm so in love with it, I've read it so many times already! It's very well-written and both Catherine and Heathcliff are fascinating.
 
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Mondo Grass ! It's what we use on 90% of our projects. It comes in dwarf and a large variety and it's almost impossible to kill !
 
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Here are a few other options I have growing between my pavers. Corsican mint is very low growing and the scent is very minty...nice.
image.jpg
If you have a damper climate Soleirolia soleirolii or Baby Tears has the same look. I also like the tiny Johnny Jump-up violets. Wooly Thyme is great for drier areas and is a real ground hugger but has a soft, silvery, fuzzy look with that great thyme scent.
image.jpg
.
 
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Here are a few other options I have growing between my pavers. Corsican mint is very low growing and the scent is very minty...nice. View attachment 836 If you have a damper climate Soleirolia soleirolii or Baby Tears has the same look. I also like the tiny Johnny Jump-up violets. Wooly Thyme is great for drier areas and is a real ground hugger but has a soft, silvery, fuzzy look with that great thyme scent.View attachment 837 .
I was thinking of thyme, actually - I planted a bunch of creeping thyme in the back yard, and it is doing well, so I thought I might get some more seeds and try them on the walkway next spring. But I like the look of the wooly thyme, if that is what the second picture is. I love the smell of thyme wafting up on a hot sunny day!

I like the idea of the Corsican mint as well - I'm a big fan of mint. I really like how it looks growing on your pavers. We've got some sort of weed here that actually grows very nicely as a ground cover, so I've let that take over a part of the patio this summer. I also found some moss growing in the back where it was shady, and tried transplanting some of that on the patio - it's growing ok where there is a lot of shade, but I don't think it will spread too much because the patio is mostly in the sun.
 
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TheCrazyPlantLady, I agree with you creeping thyme is the best option and one that I use often, in areas of heavy foot traffic, as not only does it put up with being trodden on, but emits a wonderful fragrance, as you mentioned. I normally plant Thymus ' Pink Chintz ', as this is my favorite.
Another plant, that I often plant with my creeping thyme is ground hugging Chamomile, which when crushed gives off a lovely fruity scent that compliments the smell of the thyme beautifully, a good variety is Chamaemelum Nobile ' Treneague ' .
There are many other ground huggers that I could suggest, but they don't like heavy foot traffic, so, as you said that the area, you wanted to plant was a walkway, I haven't included them.



Claudine, your Ajuga is lovely - used to grow it myself and yours is a very fine example.
 
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Well you can grow the grass instead of these plants but they are mostly destroyed by the feet while walking. So I suggest don't try to grow them in middle of walkway. You can grow the plants in the sides of the way.
 

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