Parthenocarpic Cucumber Variety


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Hello,

I have a closed-screen patio, so I don't have any pollinators. All of my plants are grown in containers. Since I don't have pollinators, I was told that I should grow parthenocarpic varieties of cucumbers. Diva was the name of one suggested to me.

I sowed the seeds in a large container around late July to early August. I thinned to 2 plants The plants foliage grew well. However, on one plant:
it also grew a bunch of female flowers, but they all shriveled up and died. None of them grew to more than 1.5 inches long. It is still growing more female flowers, but none of them grow past that length. So around 25 baby cucumbers that never grew. Every week, more and more female flowers are growing, but none of them grow past 1.5 inches long. Except for one (only 1) fruit that actually grew on the plant:

vms1jicnBxWlykBr3Nidtb67fBCaFcwSRMqR2poatKxA8xIN0QeKLYPadai5Wmu9vwNqs4l94juVFfLCqfv8UyNlF7bZbowFOnfHi60hgXqUfCHZEBTF2uz5YoCJ9sR0wbOuCexU0Y3JANkkU2dPikh1wjD7BbcUuelXMPxJWWnDwejDYQkzZ3TJInJJNzqsdYQKX-81RpqJyqAPzw01TZR-3ah_8UF8NRJqMw0meMZnZZtY03b84EY5kER0qlgCEJMRRTk3A41xjHWb3dWVjjDcBOv7Aj4XxV-LCD8CoDUNiOC84xDSLiY-LJP6itAiIiKBsGd7e5SNDZkSRtQu479UKdUy8Gf32sfQgcrrPMfJk7gTkUGW3-r1cz6gLgK3LuYhzadvc-tgzKmvO7g4euJlX8XfHoiw0FuOlQ79fI4jK3Xx6Z9laawOEvPCzeE6yFZ3dhPCXHQmEKpocDN5up89l4vhjcq7zdO5M4SwTdnB4zw-7F5w_YsGOuoHvAj-xwVhzvAWyM5FbtUJiYTGYZvUXNI-XTsyuZEPTUd0Sl38vMKJbzEPZPhNMJelcPLsMu4qHgz-Ha_qPY5LrQ2XXNPpHKphFvQ-MbXD9H43gllA67-WJRQG7Y01e1GFzmLVzL1WIVBwnUiBMLxzHEM4XjYTtXzEcXBsmIaKt7_v2IXG1tWe_DxJ9x_TJbWa1ah0Igt1Ts616sLR2iJGzZ-mDPlt=w703-h937-no



On the second plant:

I only had male flowers for around 2 months, after which I got some female flowers. Was the plant even supposed to have male flowers?

Note both of the plants were sowed from seeds from the same seed packet.

This is what the plants look like:
50V1-DP2o_MCS6axZ2VUwH-tpV9bc3kG6-rryFHMQ8DI5rnJjYF6OsdwC6egg91Q28pDLCK9aEebDRlZeQJIXPrjlamrCRXvrKIqeH9OEt92IIPiRqXREugFWmI2nNYKJKd33kkS6s3hFkf1bliHaYoDSPq9uL9Ny4_Bkfb6W9bxOS-7-mNN0-52UZ95Xfl3J9C--nrraA-aVBNlyubj7z95oKez4MKYKHN-gINM0GXurCgu81XcD0bs9jmlgSGjp2aYn451wkNsjrifiYPoxMqdDMdlCPdAs76a1psjo6Hp1lwi1SfBHz3kP_jQp_QWZReMQAEhx3lstDYUku3X6rOXZJEOGzx-o6lbP71AoPHchMbXqftPHVSI8tvkbcmHvzM6Fi6C21btzbVfLSV4G9u6EuthIFFwdhly8T79ZJi3S_eG_KRlVdXx6pMpos2wj1AQyKsXZT78bSUiVXQYNrbrR5i8JalyXJULBirreqzUkhlK2sbWsL67cLFhfnJ6UIdPRS9EaDaMEPWRUhf8vRpxdtip2rrp-xDDlmBzM4aOGwVdP3bcNjSoLXBgj5QCa3dbfgj-Sabh5m6aMOLzF5Z9hGwDtCiYxrOHxIFpxE_nXQmmh30bLDIgsSMAnRKgHsCUKqLkp04rIba1Ez7M7Urxcu-TwJ75RlfYy1euAQ8eb0Rq06LnnKqEoIQKRJrbRan-VjV-Sgfs6ylF3UNIWbg3=w703-h937-no


If you have grown Diva, any parthenocarpic variety before, or even if you haven't but you have some input/suggestions. I would greatly appreciate it.

Based on the pictures of the fruit, plant, and all the other strange occurrences, do you think I received the incorrect seed from the seed company, which could explain why none of the cucumbers grew past 1.5 inches long if the seed company send me a non-parthenocarpic variety?

Or do you think something else went wrong?

I truly appreciate all help! Thank you in advance.
 
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Gynoecious cucumbers=Mostly female flowers. Pollinators required
Parthenocarpic cucumbers=No Pollinators required. Has some male flowers
Monocious cucumbers=Male and female flowers and pollinators required.

Diva variety cucumbers are BOTH gynoecious AND parthenocarpic.
All you can do is get more seed from a different company and plant again
 
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Gynoecious cucumbers=Mostly female flowers. Pollinators required
Parthenocarpic cucumbers=No Pollinators required. Has some male flowers
Monocious cucumbers=Male and female flowers and pollinators required.

Diva variety cucumbers are BOTH gynoecious AND parthenocarpic.
All you can do is get more seed from a different company and plant again
If diva cucumbers a gynoecious (which says pollinators required) and parthenocarpic (which says no pollinators required), then do they need pollinators or not?
 
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If diva cucumbers a gynoecious (which says pollinators required) and parthenocarpic (which says no pollinators required), then do they need pollinators or not?
In theory, they do not need pollinators, because parthenogenic female flowers will form fruit without pollination, but in practice this doesn't seem to always give desired results as you've seen.
 
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Gynoecious cucumbers=Mostly female flowers. Pollinators required
Parthenocarpic cucumbers=No Pollinators required. Has some male flowers
Monocious cucumbers=Male and female flowers and pollinators required.

Diva variety cucumbers are BOTH gynoecious AND parthenocarpic.
All you can do is get more seed from a different company and plant again
A little confusing, do individual plants have both qualities, or does an individual have either quality, but only one of them? From what the OP says I guess the latter. I am a little surprised pollinators don't get in, my experience is that I find dead insects on the windowsills of what would appear to be totally sealed rooms, but I guess the real answer is to pollinate them yourself as Marck suggests.
 
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Gynoecious cucumbers=Mostly female flowers. Pollinators required
Parthenocarpic cucumbers=No Pollinators required. Has some male flowers
Monocious cucumbers=Male and female flowers and pollinators required.

Diva variety cucumbers are BOTH gynoecious AND parthenocarpic.
All you can do is get more seed from a different company and plant again
What will be different if I get it from a different company?
 
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In theory, they do not need pollinators, because parthenogenic female flowers will form fruit without pollination, but in practice this doesn't seem to always give desired results as you've seen.
Are there any cucumber varieties that don't need any pollinators? If so, what are some of them called? I tried hand pollination with a paintbrush many times before, but it rarely (<10% of the time) seems to work.
 
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Are there any cucumber varieties that don't need any pollinators? If so, what are some of them called? I tried hand pollination with a paintbrush many times before, but it rarely (<10% of the time) seems to work.
Well, those would be parthenocarpic varieties. You can continue to experiment with different growing conditions and parthenocarpic cultivars and see if you achieve greater success.

To hand-pollinate successfully you will have to check every day. You need to catch the female flowers when the stigma is receptive to pollen. Don't bother with parthenocarpic plants. grow regular monoecious cucumbers, so you will have a steady supply of male and female flowers. Have pollination work be part of your regular care schedule, until you have a fertilized crop developing.
 
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Well, those would be parthenocarpic varieties. You can continue to experiment with different growing conditions and parthenocarpic cultivars and see if you achieve greater success.

To hand-pollinate successfully you will have to check every day. You need to catch the female flowers when the stigma is receptive to pollen. Don't bother with parthenocarpic plants. grow regular monoecious cucumbers, so you will have a steady supply of male and female flowers. Have pollination work be part of your regular care schedule, until you have a fertilized crop developing.
Thank you for explaining @Marck . Unfortunately, I won't have the time to do so every day. Given that, and the fact that I really don't have pollinators, are cucumbers something I can grow?

BTW, it was a very rainy season.

I can also try growing a different variety as you suggested, I've heard Katrina is heat tolerant, if you have grown that one before.

After all, I thought commercial greenhouses do grow cucumbers many times with no pollination.
Thanks.
 
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Never say never, keep trying with the parthenocarpic cucumbers then. I suggested hand-pollination because I considered it a simple 'fix'. If that won't work for you then I guess not. How many cucumber plants are you trying to grow? I do know most vegetable gardens will require some attention every day ...most days anyway, so spending time hand-pollinating a few plants doesn't seem unreasonable.
 
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Never say never, keep trying with the parthenocarpic cucumbers then. I suggested hand-pollination because I considered it a simple 'fix'. If that won't work for you then I guess not. How many cucumber plants are you trying to grow? I do know most vegetable gardens will require some attention every day ...most days, anyway, so spending time hand-pollinating a few plants doesn't seem unreasonable.
I only have room for two (2) plants that I grow in a container. I just have enough time for watering, applying fertilizer, and pest/disease control. I wish I could hand pollinate, but I know I won't have time to do so.

With parthenocarpic cucumbers, is fruit set unpredictable? We haf a really bad rainy season this year. Do you think that could be a cause of my terrible fruit set?

And is the only thing I can do is plant more seeds and hope for the best?
 
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Ultimately, I don't know the reason for your poor crop. It sounds like you did get fruit to begin development, but they did not mature. Insufficient light or heat might explain that. Are your cucumbers growing in a full sun situation? Next year, try several different cultivars of parthenocarpic cucumber (Cucumis sativus). The cultivar 'Diva' may be a poor fit for your growing conditions. Also reach out to other local vegetable growers. They may be able to suggest a cultivar that excels in your local conditions.
 
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Ultimately, I don't know the reason for your poor crop. It sounds like you did get fruit to begin development, but they did not mature. Insufficient light or heat might explain that. Are your cucumbers growing in a full sun situation? Next year, try several different cultivars of parthenocarpic cucumber (Cucumis sativus). The cultivar 'Diva' may be a poor fit for your growing conditions.
Okay, thank you for all your help!
 
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Ultimately, I don't know the reason for your poor crop. It sounds like you did get fruit to begin development, but they did not mature. Insufficient light or heat might explain that. Are your cucumbers growing in a full sun situation? Next year, try several different cultivars of parthenocarpic cucumber (Cucumis sativus). The cultivar 'Diva' may be a poor fit for your growing conditions. Also reach out to other local vegetable growers. They may be able to suggest a cultivar that excels in your local conditions.
One more thing if you don't mind. The one cucumber that grew, I cut it today. It had seeds!!!
aUKwsAXqhxkbXxVCgKVGOIx-0jp07k6yx0b2ZlGUaADoJwxUGWKZUcxoZU869023XLMWG_E8RyR0I-MO4WHmMLNpXpAQqLHw3tenyWRwLiEX9eOnzlJqvx6JhIRTPdiM2s_3MzX9PUkkt-3smjs-LN2ETBYktKL1VJhClSpA_0fgYe64ErLYH7wmb2wUC-PL85uqNF-pEuSM16FNe1s-JBm2_sGkvDRcjl8Av4RkPM3DALZPaZxN5-yc-AMaQtQb_Pp6-HoVHuGgHhflh4GcBRvlhyPsVr7YHWe-JEzmYj2FXWT9lzOdgAb71Tw_dMu6PdkAWamFfPI9Ii56hqPDBMeFa40Pz_ToP-tD-Pi5v0imMB2B7QzPboYcbIiysVMYIt8H7s0--Aufb8q-KDVcgmM_--5E9eZ2VVR9FamUhxDCaqTags9-0LyrvxJGcLxG8y_HYbPNW0LhSGNwRp83xCfDqXQsqv2cnSaq_c8bujdzo92lzOHAlIKB5yS2yFQwD0lda6SXniiSpvCTClnJazEuWfUCbe-auSGgf19v0mYtbtX1Kjh5eGYyfRtBM3RqA_N1LwRjfGKAAe_vjBGR3lTAk08fhPv_ehMNgFTBsD4nXarqGEVEFeenmYLTSnpydzoWWjL_LGIX24lwPADDc56ihR8ofWpbaJpq-kVQjqRcHACluhbKBlZ_Pb-dAs0yBpu42lGQCf00cCIZOremxuPd=w1250-h937-no

Do you think it somehow got pollinated?
And do you think this has to be related to the fact that it is the only one that grew to full size?
 
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Those immature seeds do look larger than what I would expect from a seedless cucumber, though possibly they would just remain at that stage of development.
You did mention that one of your plants produced male flowers. Did you try any hand-pollination with those? Even if you did not, perhaps a rare pollination event happened. This might suggest that pollination would be a more successful route than parthenocarpy, but one odd cucumber doesn't prove much either way.

Parthenocarpic cucumbers are F2 hybrids that must be especially cross-bred every year. Perhaps, some percentage of the F2 offspring do not completely inherit the parthenocarpy trait. I have read that some will still produce about 10% male flowers, though that may vary with cultivar. I have also read that the pollen will be sterile, but this doesn't seem to always be the case.

Your idea that you were sent the wrong seed may be the case. Next year try seed from a different supplier. Also grow more than two plants to the flowering stage if possible. Even if you have to cull some of them later, you may get a larger array of specimens to choose from.
 
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Parthenocarpic cucumbers produce a few seeds, not many, but a few, especially if the fruit is fully mature. If there were another non-parthenocarpic variety nearby and a pollinator visited your plant, your cucumber would have many seeds AND the fruit would have a good chance of being deformed. But, your fruit has few seeds and is perfect. This is why parthenocarpic seeds cost so much, there aren't that many seeds produced from each cucumber. IF, IF your seeds are in fact NOT parthenocarpic this would explain why 25 of your cucumbers aborted. Last year I grew Biet Alpha cucumbers, another parthenocarpic variety and my fruit looked slightly different than yours does. I grew mine out in the open and I saw very few pollinators around the plant. I googled Diva cucumber images and the pictures shown are not an exact copy of yours. Mine and the images on google show a slightly wrinkled fruit. Your picture doesn't.
 
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Parthenocarpic cucumbers produce a few seeds, not many, but a few, especially if the fruit is fully mature. If there were another non-parthenocarpic variety nearby and a pollinator visited your plant, your cucumber would have many seeds AND the fruit would have a good chance of being deformed. But, your fruit has few seeds and is perfect. This is why parthenocarpic seeds cost so much, there aren't that many seeds produced from each cucumber. IF, IF your seeds are in fact NOT parthenocarpic this would explain why 25 of your cucumbers aborted. Last year I grew Biet Alpha cucumbers, another parthenocarpic variety and my fruit looked slightly different than yours does. I grew mine out in the open and I saw very few pollinators around the plant. I googled Diva cucumber images and the pictures shown are not an exact copy of yours. Mine and the images on google show a slightly wrinkled fruit. Your picture doesn't.
I only had two parthenocarpic cucumber plants, however, one of the plants grew only male flowers for the first two months. This cucumber was harvested from the other plant (that only grew female flowers).

And based on what you and @Marck said, is it correct to say that the conclusion is that one of these is true, but we don't know which?:

I had a climate or nutrition problem due to which almost all the cucumbers aborted

or I received seed that wasn't parthenocarpic.
 
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I only had two parthenocarpic cucumber plants, however, one of the plants grew only male flowers for the first two months. This cucumber was harvested from the other plant (that only grew female flowers).

And based on what you and @Marck said, is it correct to say that the conclusion is that one of these is true, but we don't know which?:

I had a climate or nutrition problem due to which almost all the cucumbers aborted

or I received seed that wasn't parthenocarpic.
It is impossible to say which is true. I can only go by my own experience. On my Beit Alphas the first blooms were all male but soon changed to about 95% female. Most of the female flowers did not produce or set fruit. Total production of the plants were quite a bit less than on my monocious plants. Losing 25 embryos can only be either wrong seeds or weather/nutrition related. I suspect you were sent the wrong seeds but cannot say for sure. You can grow cucumbers year round where you are. Your plant is healthy. You are getting plenty of flowers and embryos, so either you were sent seeds which require pollinators or it is a nutrition problem. Your plant looks good so plenty of nitrogen. You are getting plenty of blooms so plenty of phosphorus. But the embryos do not grow which could be a lack of potassium. It could also be lack of pollination=wrong seeds. I would get more seeds from a different source and I would start using either liquid seaweed or liquid kelp regularly as they are both a great source of potassium.
 

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