North Facing Fruit/Veg bed advice please


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Hiya !
I am very new to gardening but we moved house last week and we have a lovely little garden which I have always intended to use to grow some fruit and veg :)
In a year or so time we will be completely re doing the garden but for now I want to make use of what we already have here.
We have cleared this bed today and discovered it has lovely soil. I would like to make use of this and get some things growing in here. The downside is it’s position, right in front of the garage making it North facing :(
I had a quick google but if anyone else has any advice / tips or recommendations on what edible things I could grow here that would be great!
thank you!
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Hello @nelson31, welcome to the forum :)

I think you would do well to grow some salad leaves there, with radishes, beetroot, spring onions and a few carrots.
 
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Oh great thank you! I can grow all of those in one bed can I ?
 
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If you just sow a half row of each, and save the rest of the seeds for later, you`ll find that you can re sow more seeds as you get spaces. Sow them thinly they need to be thinned out as they get bigger.
Anything in the cabbage family will be ok in shade too, but they take up a fair bit more space.
 
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Look up square space gardening and think crop rotation. The best spinach and a wide variety of leaf lettuces I ever grew through the heat of summer was in a totally shaded bed.
 
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Thanks very much for advice!
I have worked out I have approx. 10 x square foot spaces and have purchased the following seeds:
Peas
Beetroot
Lettuce
Spinach
Broccoli
Kale
Carrots

I have a worked the bed over a bit and I think it’s ready but I’m wondering if there’s any tips or tricks before I sow them? They all say they’re suitable for sowing outdoors from March... should I just go for it??
I’m in London and we’re due rain over the next few days, is it better to sow before or after rain is due or doesn’t matter?
thanks!
 

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Sorry I can`t really help with this - in the UK this strange idea hasn`t really taken off. For example, you would be lucky to fit one single broccoli plant in a space that size :rolleyes: We usually plant stuff (very thinly) in rows and space the rows according to the size of the veggies.
I would move the other plants already in there out of the way, and I suggest putting the peas in a tray to germinate otherwise the mice will find them. Plant these out when they become sizeable plants.

On that little patch, to start with, I would make two drills across, and plant a few beetroot, and lettuce along one row (half a row for each) and the same for row two, with, maybe carrots and spinach. Water the seeds in with a fine rose watering can, and let them get on with it. If it doesn`t rain, a light watering just when they seem dry.

Whatever you decide to do - good luck.
 
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The trick in my humble opinion for growing in a small space is to have a general plan with smaller varieties of plants and multiple plantings as things are harvested. Rather than planting in rows, you are planting based on spacing needs of the different varieties. Since your space is shaded you have an added component.

Things like kale, tomatoes and peppers are out of the question. They are large and require sun. Lettuce, spinach, arugula, green onions are more likely to be successful. You can try greens that get larger with the plan of harvesting as baby plants. Remember to add compost as you are replanting areas after harvest and prior to replanting. Where I would not consider growing pea vines for peas, I have harvested new pea shoots for salads. Think swanky restaurant salads. Last years baby carrots were a big hit.

Here is a list of.... Shade loving veggies
 

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