No need to see clay as a problem


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There seems to be a real negative vibe around clay soil, people even suggesting that those who have it should get it dug out, but let me set the record straight I have worked on all types of soil from desert sand to true blue clay and I would rather have the clay any day, why is this you may ask, well simply because it is a nutritious soil and by working in good organic matter you will be able to create a good clay loam in quite a short space of time. In my experience I make compost out of virtually all garden waste but for clay soils I tend to make a compost with a lot of hedge cuttings from deciduous hedges like hawthorn, beech and privet adding wood chip from tree surgeons and a few layers of grass cuttings, the reason for this is that I find this mix keeps the soil structure open better than any other organic matter, I sometimes use manure but I must emphasise it must be well rotted otherwise it is heavy and clumpy making it difficult to work, manure that is not well rotted seems to hold too much moisture for clay soil and in my opinion I will only use it when it is properly rotted and does not resemble animal manure but is dark in colour, odourless and crumbly in the hand.Incidentally I put hedge cuttings and woody prunings through the shredder before adding to compost to speed up the composting process.Many generations of my family have gardened on clay, we always seemed to have plenty of fruit and veg and on the farm always had best quality grass in the fields.all from clay soil.its just a question of working it and working with it..Happy gardening all !!
 
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alp

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I agree. I have clay and it has taken me 5 years to improve my clay. Loads of bark mulch and horse manure .. I don't think I would like to garden with sand ..
 
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No, gardening on sand was a nightmare lays watering and adding compost and feeding several, times a year.
 
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MaryMary

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Meant to say always watering
:) Robert, if you look at the very bottom of your post, you will see something that looks like:

Robert Cummings, 22 minutes ago , Edit Delete Report
If you click Edit, it will open an edit window where you can change your post - correct things or add things if you forgot something.

:unsure: I think this forum gives you about an hour for the edit window... unlike members in some other forums, we are forgetful, rather than incendiary! :ROFLMAO:
 
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I garden on sand......well, loamy sand. Good soil esp in back garden. Near the coast, a walled garden and a sunny one so a hot summer can be difficult. However, the soil does now hold reasonable moisture and it is deep and easy to work. It is actually a joy to work :)
The essential thing is to grow plants to suit your conditions....so, all sorts of tender plants will thrive here. Also to create microclimates....this happens anyway in most gardens....so that shade lovers can be catered for too.
An advantage of sandy soils is that plants grow less lushly....less inclined to flop, less attractive to slugs and usually more floriferous.
 
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