New Succulents!


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I was recently gifted two succulents. They look healthy- no bugs, over inflated or deflated leaves, nothing is brown. I don't know what types they are or if they have the right type of soil. Their pots do have a hole in the bottom. Tips on light? Feeding? Watering? (I have hrard they like less water.)
 

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Here are the names inside the plastic pots:

11.00 oz. Stnwr crakl urn c/s gdn 999050

Hmmm they both say that. Well I will upload pix and maube someone here will know what kinds they are.
 

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How do I repot them? They are in plastic pots inside ceramic pots. Can I shake off the old dirt and use "cactus dirt" for the soil? Also does anyone know what types these are?
 

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The plant on the left is Echeveria x 'Black Prince', a hybrid of Echeveria affinis X Echeveria shaviana, in the Stonecrop Family (Crassulaceae). Both parent species are native to Mexico.

The plant on the right is a cultivar of x Gasteraloe, a nothogenus between the genera Aloe and Gasteria. Both genera are in the Asphodel family (Asphodelaceae). All Gasteria are native to South Africa (bare entering Mozambique and Namibia), and many Aloe are as well, including the likely parent, Aristaloe aristata, formerly Aloe aristata.
 
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