New lawn owner, what kind of weeds do I have!!!


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Hi there.

Finally got me some lawn!!! I am in Northern NJ in the United States.

Before I take down these weeds, i would like to know what was there for my "notes"... I plan to keep a full journal of my gardening experience. Tried to identify these myself, but it is quite difficult.

There are two weed types in these photos. 3 pics of one, 1 pic of the other... I believe these are pretty common weeds.

Thanks.
 

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Hmm.. USA on your profile no other geodata so no zone info. Dark and green thin bladed grass seemingly a fescue, possibly creeping red but more likely Tall Fescue. This indicates what would be safe for the lawn of course as some weed enders kill fescue.
 
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Thank you... Yes, I have concluded the grass is fescue. Probably a mix from over the years. House is 54 years old at this point. I will eventually team up some lawn and reseed with newer high quality grass in some of the shadier areas.
 
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When in doubt, try reading the post! :p :ROFLMAO:



The first one looks familiar, but I don't know the name of it. :(

Welcome to the forum!! :)

Yep I am guilty of speeding again! That grass looks lush and dark green. I would think that is the high quality type of grass one would want. If it is not growing in shady areas I would thin or limb up the trees and get to a dappled light condition.
 
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Hi -

yes tree work is happening soon to the tune of $8k... 15 trees coming down, cleaning deadfall on over an acrre, elevating all of the yard perimeter, stump grinding, removal of several big piles of cut trees, pruning some dead oak... I can't wait, going to let in a ton more sunlight that has been kept out for years.

Wife figured out what the weed with the yellow flower is - Wild Strawberry. Meanwhile, I sprayed the lawn with the Trimec and clover is dying, wild strawberry is slowly dying off... grass is totally fine.
 
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The plant in the first photo is Thyme-leaved Speedwell (Veronica serpyllifolia ssp. serpyllifolia), a common lawn visitor native to Eurasia

The Yellow-flowered plant in the other three photos is Indian Mock-strawberry (Potentilla indica, formerly Duchesnea indica), a member of the Rose Family (Rosaceae) native to southern and eastern Asia as well as the islands of Sri Lanka, Philippines, Hainan, Taiwan, and Japan.
 
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The plant in the first photo is Thyme-leaved Speedwell (Veronica serpyllifolia ssp. serpyllifolia), a common lawn visitor native to Eurasia

The Yellow-flowered plant in the other three photos is Indian Mock-strawberry (Potentilla indica, formerly Duchesnea indica), a member of the Rose Family (Rosaceae) native to southern and eastern Asia as well as the islands of Sri Lanka, Philippines, Hainan, Taiwan, and Japan.
And the least toxic method of killing said weeds is what?
 
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If your primary concern is not using any potentially toxic chemicals, I would recommend hand-weeding for light, scattered infestations and for dense local infestations re-seeding or re-sodding the area in question. However, this may be unnecessarily laborious as selective broad-leaf herbicides are reasonably safe when used as directed. This was the method the OP chose.

However, there is another lawn strategy that is less laborious, expensive, and toxic than any I have already mentioned, and with added beauty and ecological benefits as well. That strategy is to not bother killing the 'weeds' at all, but rather to encourage a diverse assemblage of different plants growing together in a lawn area. This is often called a multi-species or tapestry lawn. Such lawns can be kept to any desired height by mowing.
 
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