New garden hut.


Colin

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Hi,

I've been torn between making a new garden hut or building an Hobbit House. I favoured the Hobbit House but common sense kicked in; it would mean moving lots of heavy building materials up our steep garden whereas making a new hut would be hard enough. Our summer's are so short and I want to do some woodturning and metal spinning too plus lots of other interesting projects; a Hobbit house would take quite a bit of time and a great deal of effort so hut it is. I built a new hut a couple of years ago but need a second hut to store more gardening kit in. It's not going to be a shed because it won't have windows; I don't see the point of putting expensive gardening kit on display for our local low life.

I've spent time preparing the site in readiness and the timber arrived this morning so the hut floor is now completed; it's a joy to use my workshop machines in anger; cross cutting or ripping 4.2m lengths of timber is so easy saving a huge amount of time; after dinner I need to machine the "V" grooves in the boards which will be fun because the timber is still very wet after being treated at the sawmill. I've knocked off for dinner so having a few minutes spare thought I'd add this thread for a bit of interest, I could have bought a sectional hut but my home made hut will be much stronger.

Kind regards, Colin.

New hut._002_01.JPG


Steep garden causes lots of problems; just standing upright is challenging.

New hut._003_01.JPG


Retaining wall under construction; these stones were heavy to move onto site.

New hut._001_01.JPG


Retaining wall completed; not the best wall I've built but will be hidden by the hut.

New hut._002.JPG


3" x 3" treated fence posts as floor joists well supported.

New hut._001.JPG


New hut delivered this morning as flat pack.

New hut._004.JPG


What a joy to cross cut long lengths of timber so easily. Cutting two at once to save even more time. Please note the "stop" ensuring all lengths are equal saving lots of measuring.

New hut._005.JPG


New hut floor completed. It's certainly heavy duty and will eventually be covered with lino. Looks easy so far but it doesn't show my aching bones.

New hut._006.JPG
 
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Meadowlark

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Certainly looks like a solid foundation...and some good lumber. Looking good!
 

Colin

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Hi,

Thanks Esther for taking an interest; yes it will be a one off. :)

Thanks Meadowlark; I doubt I'll have problems with the foundations having gone to this amount of time and trouble; I could have bought a sectional hut and it would be erected by now but I want a hut that's going to be much more robust. :)

Yesterday I started machining the boards; each board needed two rebates then the "V" profile so first job was cross cut to length then spend time setting my home made saw bench up to cut the rebates; each board would need four passes through the saw total 2,300' of cutting. I didn't need a bedtime story last night.

This morning I've been routing the "V" profile; only one profile per board but as the boards are so wet it's been extremely difficult due to the router clogging up with debris meaning constant clearing; about 575' to rout; I've just carried these completed boards up to the hut site and it's flattened me I feel exhausted but after dinner I'm sure I'll be ready for action again; this retirement sure is hard graft.

Because I've got stuck into this hut project and the timber is here it's forecast thunder from tomorrow which is about right for my luck; my personal black cloud Blackie has let up for quite a while but now as usual whilst working outside I'll be getting the usual soakings; we have a number of huge moorland fires raging at the moment so a lot of rain will be most welcome as it will too for the gardens.

Kind regards, Colin.
 

Colin

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Hi,

Once again I worked myself to a standstill; I was incredibly tired by the time I knocked off yesterday at 8pm after a full day on this project.

Machining the timber was very difficult due to the timber being so wet; progress has been made though as seen in the pictures below; I'm unable to do more work this morning and this afternoon is forecast thunderstorms; last night I carried the remaining timber into the workshop after all its already wet enough without thunderstorms adding more.

Kind regards, Colin.

New hut._007.JPG


Home made 4hp saw bench set up for running rebates.

New hut._008.JPG


First pass for each rebate; please note offset saw kerf; cut is 1/2" deep.

New hut._009.JPG


This wet timber clogged up the dust extraction so I had to do the job without extraction; I was wearing dust mask and hearing defenders throughout; this treated sawdust is highly injurious to health; it's possible arsenic is used in the treatment process.

New hut._010.JPG


What an horrible job without extractor running.

New hut._011.JPG


Space is rather limited but I manage to get through lots of work.

New hut._012.JPG


My big 3hp Makita router choked with wet debris; I spent more time clearing the debris than actually routing.

New hut._013.JPG


Routing under way adding chamfers (V's) to the boards.

New hut._014.JPG


Our neighbours lovely cat Ruby keeping me company.

New hut._015.JPG


It's coming together but very difficult working on the steep slope. Bron and I are about to go out so no work on the hut this morning.
 

Meadowlark

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Very impressive rebates and a lot of work. Its going to be great.
 

Colin

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Hi,

Thanks DrCase; yes indeed goodbye ugly wall. ;)

I'm my own worst enemy Esther; I've got tunnel vision; one job at a time and get on with it until completed; being a guy I can't multitask and I don't like jobs hanging on. I've done a lot more timber machining this afternoon so with luck tomorrow the job will move on apace. :)

Yes; definitely a lot of work Meadowlark but apart from aching bones and being tired out it's quite enjoyable; had the garden been on the level rather then a valley side it wouldn't have been so tiring; I enjoy these projects a lot though. :)

I'll update with more pictures as work progresses.

Kind regards, Colin.
 
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I'm my own worst enemy Esther; I've got tunnel vision; one job at a time and get on with it until completed; being a guy I can't multitask and I don't like jobs hanging on
quite opposite of my husband. 1/2 jobs done are left for months, just irritates me. I want to yell FINISH ALREADY. example our deck is half painted last fall, spends winter the other half not painted/ re stained. its not that he is twiddling his thumbs, but don't start something if you can't finish it. will keep checking back. good job Colin.
 
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A good idea to start a separate thread. There's los of people who are interested in the progress of a project. I did the same with the build of our tea-house. It's just a succession of photographs I put on You-Tube seven years ago. It still gets about a thousand hits a month, it's up to over 75,000 now. You'd have the same success, or better.
 
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You don't do things halfway! Solid wood will last several lifetimes. Great job. Now here is something else to consider. Give the shed a living roof to add character to it. Depending on the amount of sun you could grow sedum or a shade loving plant like periwinkle. The only additional expense would be some EPDM and dirt.
 

Colin

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Hi,

Thanks Esther for your continuing encouragement which I do appreciate. Over the years I've known many guys who have started jobs only to get out of their depth then walking away; there's been many TV programs showing such failures where a team has been called in to sort everything out; Once I start a job I stick with it whatever problems are thrown at me. This morning I had switched the TV from YouTube to the normal rubbish and changed into my workshop clothes when Bron told me there was something wrong with the TV; the picture was green; after much frustration the colours were back on so I wandered down to the workshop in the rain; Blackie my personal cloud had been waiting for me. At 10:30 I came up into the bungalow for a mug of tea to be greeted by a blocked toilet so another 30 minutes wasted sorting this out; I can't remember our toilet ever blocking previously; it never lets up when I want to get stuck into a project; anyway after dinner I finally settled down and have just knocked off.

Thanks Logan; yes it's built like the Titanic; I just hope it lasts longer.

It's kind of you Sean to suggest I put this hut project onto YouTube but I already struggle for time to keep up with forums and I like to respond to all replies to my threads; I should hate to offend anyone if they take the time and trouble to respond. You're doing well though with YouTube; good on you; well done.

Thanks mgmine for your useful suggestion; I like the hut roof to be just felted then it's easier to maintain but I understand what you mean.

Yes Esther; treated wood is a must for outside projects; this wood is soaking wet having been tanalized; I'm being very careful regarding personal safety; arsenic is often used in pressure treatments so I'm wearing dust mask and ear defenders; I'm also strictly adhering to hygiene with regards washing my hands before consuming food of any kind; another problem with treated wood is if it's being burned; treated wood is readily available but can pose serious health risks especially longer term? Thanks also for glitter man; yes definitely me and I glitter with the best of them.

Kind regards, Colin.
 
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I am glad your good about washing your hands. Some folks are not, it just unnerves me. Especially if I have dinner guest and they went to the bathroom, and you don't hear the water running in the sink after, and the towel is not move from where I left it hung. I just want to puke as they drift their hands over a serving bowl to scope out food for their plate. They quickly get off my list for a next dinner visit. My husband's brother is keen for that, but because I have known him for years and he does not have someone to cook him a good supper he will come over to "help" my husband with projects outdoors then when he comes inside he may sometime reach for a plate first, but quickly is stopped by me ---with a directive of "did you wash your hands" He knows better and hardly needs reminding of that. You wonder how he was raised. My husband has at least been trained in that area these years. the other thing is the toilet seat, keeping it down. another issue with me.
 
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It's so important to regularly wash your hands. In the house I do it often as the medication thst my wife takes compromises her immune system.

For everyone, it's important when gardening. You hear tales of people who get blood poisoning and other illnesses, sometimes fatal, from small injuries that they get from gardening. I have had this in my former koi pool filter room since 1986. Hot and cold water supply, hand baisin, germicidal soap, nailbrush and some plasters and tea-tree oil in the cupboard for minor injuries. Oh! and now since the koi pool has gone, a kettle to make tea, or remedial Budweisers in the fridge to aid recovery.


P1020627.JPG
 

Logan

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I always wash my hands especially when I've dried the boys with a towel that i keep specially for them and it can get dirty from wiping their paws. :)
 
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Colin

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Hi,

I managed to survive my childhood; up to five years old no electricity in the home; gas and water only and cold water at that; hot water boiled in a kettle and a tin bath in front of the fire; single coal fire only with freezing bedrooms; my late father and grandfather were both coal miners; carbolic soap was very common and is still widely available;

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Carbolic_soap

Kids in those days were tough and had to be. How times have changed; we now have a lovely car that virtually drives itself all I have to do is steer.

I buy lots of boxes of latex gloves from Rufforth Auto Jumble and get through these pretty quickly also I buy dozen pair packs of rigger gloves for heavy jobs. Boxes of dust masks and I also bought a Trend Airshield helmet for dusty work especially on the woodturning lathe;


These helmets are not cheap but at least can be bought unlike a new pair of lungs. I don't go mad regarding personal safety but if it feels wrong then I don't do it. I wear safety shoes whilst in the workshop and in the garden if its not raining.

Kind regards, Colin.
 

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