New flower bed

Discussion in 'Garden Projects' started by Sheal, Dec 8, 2017.

  1. Sheal

    Sheal

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    At the end of September I moved house. With plenty to do inside I had no intention of starting anything major in the garden until next Spring. Well that's what I thought until a dear forum friend sent me a bare-root rose, thank you, which had to be planted as soon as possible. There's only one tiny bed in shade in the front garden, pretty useless for a rose being a sun lover.

    Interrupting the 'doings' inside I ventured outside with my spade and fork to start work in a sunny spot in the back garden. There was no point in digging out just a small patch for the rose leaving the rest until Spring, I might as well complete the job and leave it ready for future planting up. :)

    I always work without a plan and see what develops as I go along. First job to remove the turf having no idea what type of soil is underneath.

    003 New First Bed.JPG

    A bit of a surprise! I was expecting clay but no it's loamy, stony sand and yet another hungry soil. My last garden was sandy being coastal and I was hoping to escape that, it needs a lot of manure and compost to enrich it.
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    In the process of digging out I came across a cable coming out of the house wall immediately to the right of the bathroom outlet pipe, this supplying electricity to the septic tank pump. Although it's buried deep I've put a roof tile there temporarily so I don't cause any damage ( or electrocute myself) with further digging.

    With the bed dug over, many stones and rocks removed, I planted the rose with manure at it's roots and back filled with blood fish and bone mixed with soil. The shape of the bed waiting to be fine tuned.
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    The rose looking a little lost by itself at the moment.
    007 Rose 'Crazy For You'.JPG

    More to follow......
     

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    Sheal, Dec 8, 2017
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  2. Sheal

    alp

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    Soil looks nice, @Sheal! Wish mine was like that! Very nice curvy lines .. Before you know, you will have roses pumping out fragrance!
     
    alp, Dec 8, 2017
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  3. Sheal

    Sheal

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    After a break for an early sprinkling of snow it's back to work. Below I've fine tuned the curves.

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    I've spread some compost but need more. When I moved to Scotland the contents of my house went into storage while I rented a furnished cottage that didn't have a garden. That in turn meant I couldn't bring many plants with me. With very little space in the car I only managed to squeeze in four behind the front seats. Three of them were rare, two Fuschia's and a dwarf Iris, also a much moved Geranium.

    The stick to the left marks the Geranium. The Iris is to the right and in front of that a sad Sedum that I rescued, having been smothered by an established Bamboo in the front garden here. Sadly I lost both Fuschia's over last winter, to cold outside and to warm inside.
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    That's it until next Spring when I start planting up the rest of the bed. I half expect to move the plants, with the exception of the rose, to different positions.

    The rose 'Crazy For You' picture taken from the internet.
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    Dwarf Iris, sweetly perfumed.
    Iris 'Little Chestnut' (4).JPG

    Geranium.
    Geranium (1).JPG

    Sedum. This picture was taken in my last garden and I expect the one in the new bed to be the same, turning a burgundy colour late in the season.
    Sedum (2).JPG
     
    Sheal, Dec 8, 2017
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  4. Sheal

    alp

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    Love that rose and what an apt name CRAZY FOR YOU! Very pretty and they will look spectacular next to the sedum ..

    Very exciting, Sheal!
     
    alp, Dec 8, 2017
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  5. Sheal

    Sheal

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    Thanks @alp. I'm looking forward to seeing the rose in bloom. :)
     
    Sheal, Dec 8, 2017
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  6. Sheal

    alp

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    @Sheal, I am sure you will do a fabulous job of it, judging from the photos of your gardens. You know, I was a bit shocked to see the curvy lines..

    I am so dumb - every flower bed made by me was square, straight, not very feminine! See, your lines are sexy and different. I really should observe more and not dig any more SQUARE hole!:LOL:
     
    alp, Dec 8, 2017
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  7. Sheal

    Sheal

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    When you think about it @alp our gardens start off as a square or oblong plot usually, adding curves softens that even with a long border. It makes it a bit more difficult for mowing the lawn but it's worth it. :)

    I've never had my lines described as sexy before. :LOL: You too can have sexy lines. If you've got square beds now it's still possible to put curves in. If you're worried about creating the shape you can either draw it out on paper first or walk round the bed creating curves with some sand. If they don't look right brush them out and start again. :)
     
    Sheal, Dec 8, 2017
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  8. Sheal

    Sheal

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    Two newly dug out beds in my last garden, both about 17 to 18 feet long. You can create any shape you like. :)

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    Sheal, Dec 8, 2017
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  9. Sheal

    alp

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    I will have sexy curvy islands when I move .. whenever that is. I won't want to see my plant leaning forward for the sun again. Because of that, my rose arch which was wreathed in and out with clematis armandii and Jackmanii had to be dismantled. I used numerous sticks to prop it up, but no! In the end, the pulling power of the sun was just too much. Thanks you sharing your photos as they really give me some idea..

    But I have to sell my house first .. Tonight I will dream ..
     
    alp, Dec 8, 2017
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  10. Sheal

    alp

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    Oh, I will be a very dirty COPYCAT, if you don't mind me!:LOL::ROFLMAO:;)
     
    alp, Dec 8, 2017
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  11. Sheal

    Sheal

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    Don't give up hope of moving. It took me sixteen months to sell my last house and a year to find the one I'm in now after selling.

    We're always learning with gardening, especially by mistakes - but it's fun getting it right! :)

    I don't mind you being a copycat, it's nice to know I'm of some use. :D
     
    Sheal, Dec 8, 2017
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  12. Sheal

    alp

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    Good morning, Sheal et al: Judging from your favorite plants, I will copy that as well. Don't think I will have your neatness, but I like the rose and the colour scheme.

    I'd be laughing if I can move 16 months. There are always the dreaded chains. Hope it's nice and calm in Scotland. We don't seem to have any snow here, yet!;)
     
    alp, Dec 9, 2017
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  13. Sheal

    Verdun

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    Looking good Sheal :) Those shapes make for exciting plantings (y)

    I am an enthusiast for island beds and big sweeping curves.......Adrian Bloom (of Bressingham Gardens fame) was my inspiration and I still have that mentallity when planting. It means the old logic of always having the tallest plants at the back and the smallest at the front can be challenged and experimented with.....all fun(y)
     
    Verdun, Dec 9, 2017
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  14. Sheal

    Colin Retired.

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    Hi,

    Very well done Sheal. (y)

    I'm impressed by your stamina in digging the beds which is hard graft especially the first dig; what's the soil like to get the spade into; are you finding lots of debris like stones or other buried junk? I've been digging our rear garden over and it's been very difficult indeed but apart from the top of the garden where its rectangular lower down I too have created curves; I turned all the grass and moss in; next springtime I'll go over with a tiller.

    Thanks for sharing and for posting the excellent pictures; full credit to you Sheal; I'm impressed. (y)

    Kind regards, Colin.
     
    Colin, Dec 9, 2017
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  15. Sheal

    LIcenter

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    Lookin good Sheal. Another note on curved beds is, it looks more natural. Mother Nature doesn't do squares or straight lines very well, if at all. Can't wait to see what you have in mind for the entire bed.
     
    LIcenter, Dec 9, 2017
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  16. Sheal

    Sheal

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    Thanks everyone for your kind comments. (y)

    The rose wasn't my choice having been a gift from a friend, that said I'd admired the one that my friend already had so I'm very pleased with it. :) I don't work with a colour scheme, I plant what I like whether it clashes or not. I plant by height, it's no good having small plants at the back of a bed.

    You and me both Verdun. :) Unfortunately I couldn't have borders in my last garden, my house deeds restricted me from planting within 9ft of the boundaries because of the main services running through from front to back. It also made sense to have island beds as my front garden was large.

    I'm not so sure it's stamina Colin but will power. ;) I shouldn't be digging at all but like most gardeners I enjoy it as much as anything else I work on out there. The soil is easy to work with and living in a rural area there's no builders rubble etc. to deal with. I do live on rocky ground though and there were quite a few stones and a number of small rocks to dig out.

    I've been watching your progress Colin and it's going well. (y) My garden has a gentle slope not the side of a hill that you have to contend with.

    Mother Nature likes to do her own thing and in most of my garden she does......with the exception of my beds, they're mine to play with! I have nothing in mind for the bed as I don't plan ahead in the garden. When I shop for plants I will buy what I like and what will survive, taking into account height and spread only. I don't colour co-ordinate but it seems to work out okay. :)

    131.JPG
     
    Sheal, Dec 9, 2017
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  17. Sheal

    alp

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    Judging by the last photo, Verdun, you've competition. Are they on steroid?
     
    alp, Dec 10, 2017
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  18. Sheal

    Verdun

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    Sheal, I agree that's a delightful picture :).

    Ha ha alp. You are right :)

    However, I like to co-ordinate plants....by colour, shape, texture, etc......but, now and then, mother nature throws up wonderful ideas. Behind me the towans leading to the beach is full of wild plantings that just look so comfortable. She has planted a 200 metre avenue of vipers bugloss, evening primrose, pink saponaria, white, pink and red valerian, yellow coconut scented gorse (almost always in flower) and Tamarisk. Overhead and behind wide spreading sea buckthorn with blue foliage and orange berries look good as does the foreground swathes of lemon scented thyme and wild orchids ...how can we beat that? :)

    I am also beginning to change my mind about so-called colour clashes..........Christopher Lloyd came to the conclusion that nothing really clashes in the garden as long as the plants grow well and are happy; he planted whatever took his fancy. A "clashing" colour often created interest, a talking point and, prob took a bit of bravery! (y) Might make a couple of "brave" plantings next year myself! :)
     
    Verdun, Dec 10, 2017
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  19. Sheal

    alp

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    I have to say that I like colours of a similar moods chucked together. For example a deep red goes with black or dark brown. I like neighbouring colours in the colour wheel..

    Or just two clashing colours together.. Too many clashing colours is a headache for me!
     
    alp, Dec 10, 2017
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  20. Sheal

    Sheal

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    No not steroids @alp but annuals do like a dose of chicken manure pellets. :D

    Go on @Verdun! Select a bed and try planting at random colour-wise. ;) If you use annuals they'll be gone by the end of the season and you can start afresh when they've finished.

    I haven't got a clue who Christopher Lloyd is but I like his style! :)
     
    Sheal, Dec 10, 2017
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