Nettles to Liquid Nitrogen Feed


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I have been neglecting my garden lately. There has always been something happening, and by the time I remember, it is too cold in the afternoon to do some gardening.

My flowerbeds had been overgrown with nettles. This is actually a good sign that the soil is in a pretty decent condition. I am making a liquid nitrogen feed from them. It is so simple to make.

Place nettles in a bucket, cover with water and let it soak for 4 weeks, and voila there you have a highly nutritious feed for your plants!
 
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Thank you for the tip! It sounds like something easy to make, so I'll definitely try it out.
I was also thinking about making my own nettle tea. The one that I buy at the store is pretty tasty:)
 

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Too late in the year for tea Claudine, nettles change in composition around july, making them inedible. Cut some down and wait for the new growth, that should be alright. It's also good for caterpillars, as they can't feed off the old growth.

Just made a dustbin full off Comfrey liquid feed for the tomatoes, its high in potassium, but smells like the devil's own cesspit :D
 
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Oh...:( I didn't know that it's too late. I'll make my own nettle tea next year then and for now I'll drink the one from the store. Thank you for the tip.
 

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Oh...:( I didn't know that it's too late. I'll make my own nettle tea next year then and for now I'll drink the one from the store. Thank you for the tip.
I just looked it up, its actually the beginning of june, after that they become coarser & act as a laxative :eek:

We've got some odd old sayings in England, think there's one about not eating blackberries after Michalmas because the Devil's wee'd on them :D
 
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Lol, it's good that you warned me, I wouldn't like to take a laxative:p
Now, I'm tempted to eat blackberries after Michalmas to see what happens, haha;)
 
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Too late in the year for tea Claudine, nettles change in composition around july, making them inedible. Cut some down and wait for the new growth, that should be alright. It's also good for caterpillars, as they can't feed off the old growth.

Just made a dustbin full off Comfrey liquid feed for the tomatoes, its high in potassium, but smells like the devil's own cesspit :D
You should smell my homemade seaweed extract...:eek:
 
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How did I miss this before? There is nowhere to get seaweed locally so I have been thinking about using the food variety and making a "tea." I'm already doing that with banana peel with much success.

Nettles aren't something I have experience with; not sure they even grow anyplace near me. Haven't even seen comfrey dried on a shelf for tea in ages; would definitely have to grow that myself. Thinking of giving fennel seed tea a try for the garden.
 

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If you grow Comfrey make sure you put it in a permanent place, its a bugger to get out once its established. Also, try & get some roots of the Bocking 14 variety, the seeds from that are sterile, stops it self seeding everywhere.

The tea might not be on the shelf as there was some talk of it being carcinogenic some years back.
 
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Will have to look into that carcinogen thing; hadn't heard that before. Almost all herbs (like foods) contain minerals and so forth that could become toxic if over consumed. Pennyroyal was pulled a a while back because young girls were attempting to use it for birth control. L-tryptophan was pulled off the shelves because of a tainted batch, yet there is all this other stuff out there that should be banned and isn't.
 
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I wonder how much of it you would have to use before the liver toxicity kicked in. I used to use it blended with other herbs for colds and such (I vaguely remember it was supposed to be effective for coughs). In fact, it was one of the herbs in a supplement I used to buy. Wonder if they changed the formula... might explain why the store suddenly stopped carrying the supplement.
 
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Not sure, I used to eat it as a vegetable till I read about it. That was back in the 1980's Stopped eating it as i'm quite fond of my liver:D
 
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I started using it in the latter part of the 80s and probably stopped some time in the 90s. Never heard about the carcinogenic issue until now. Don't really have the growing space to dedicate to it anyway so I suppose it is just as well. I've read that hair adds nitrogen to the soil, though you can't really make a liquid from that, lol.
 

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Clover & beans have nitrogen fixing nodules on the roots, but the best thing is a good thunderstorm, that fixes nitrogen straight from the air into the rain. Ever noticed how lush things look after a storm?
 
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I'm going to be soaking handfuls of beans and tossing them into the compost from now on, lol. I'll also be pulling handfuls of clover when it comes up in the spring and tossing that in as well. Or perhaps I'll harvest the clover and save it to make a garden tonic. Most of my plants are in containers and with healthy enough soil mixes that I don't worry about deficiencies, but I have a few older things in need of repotting that may be in need of amendment.
 

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