Mr. Lincoln and my alkaline clay?


Joined
Oct 8, 2017
Messages
4,365
Reaction score
3,754
Location
Birmingham Alabama
Hardiness Zone
8a
Country
United States
I brought home 4 Mr Lincoln hybrids, which is a challenge for me because I seem to lose grafted roses by not covering for winter. I am going to try again but it has been more than 10 years since the last hybrids so I had better ask about any tricks to growing them given my soil is basically red clay with a 8ph. I have an area with morning and noon sun that drains well in the sense that it is sloped. I would love some companion suggestions as well.
 
Ad

Advertisements

Joined
Oct 8, 2017
Messages
4,365
Reaction score
3,754
Location
Birmingham Alabama
Hardiness Zone
8a
Country
United States
Perhaps he is not so sure? Generally, thorny or viney plants do well here without my help so I am not too worried. But roots being a mystery to me in this case will make me look to confirm his reports.
 
  • Like
Reactions: alp
Joined
Jan 30, 2018
Messages
78
Reaction score
85
Location
SE. London/N.Kent. UK
Hardiness Zone
8
Country
United Kingdom
Roses are considered best suited to a soil pH of 6.0 to 6.9
Generally accepted a pH of 7.0 is taken as being neutral, let's not get tangled up in th sciencxe and physics here. So our friend's reading is 8.0 At first sight one might simply say. Dig in lots of green maure etc. Anything to lower the pH scale. Fair do's, but we are dealing with clay. Clay changes it's pH values constantly. When sodden it will give one reading. Then suddenly the readings change. Sadly it is one of sciences nightmares. What's the solution? Trial and error. Who knows. Perhaps digging out a vast lump of clay and filing the hole with suitable compost, then planting. OK this might help. Constant acidic feeding may also help. At the end of the day......Have you ever thought of growing????????????
 
Joined
Oct 9, 2017
Messages
1,219
Reaction score
1,602
Location
Warrenton North Carolina
Hardiness Zone
7b
Country
United States
I received 2 Roses and also have clay soil so I am going to try a modified Hugelkulture by burying some rotted pine logs and needles and plant the roses on it. I am going to give them nothing else except water if needed. If they croak I am not out anything.
 
Joined
Oct 8, 2017
Messages
4,365
Reaction score
3,754
Location
Birmingham Alabama
Hardiness Zone
8a
Country
United States
Roses are considered best suited to a soil pH of 6.0 to 6.9
Generally accepted a pH of 7.0 is taken as being neutral, let's not get tangled up in th sciencxe and physics here. So our friend's reading is 8.0 At first sight one might simply say. Dig in lots of green maure etc. Anything to lower the pH scale. Fair do's, but we are dealing with clay. Clay changes it's pH values constantly. When sodden it will give one reading. Then suddenly the readings change. Sadly it is one of sciences nightmares. What's the solution? Trial and error. Who knows. Perhaps digging out a vast lump of clay and filing the hole with suitable compost, then planting. OK this might help. Constant acidic feeding may also help. At the end of the day......Have you ever thought of growing????????????
Interesting you would mention changing pH. I am aware that rain is lower pH while the limestone chalk clay we have is a higher pH. I will test the rain sodden area out front as it was puddling this am. Later this summer as the dry time comes, I will test again.
 
  • Like
Reactions: alp
Ad

Advertisements

alp

Joined
Mar 20, 2017
Messages
14,649
Reaction score
14,134
Location
Essex
Hardiness Zone
9b
Country
United Kingdom
DM: Would be interesting to see your Access file - full of pHs! Agree with SRunning: Put your desired compost in a big hole and your rose will acclimatise or adapt. I have 100% claymageddon and I don't really mind, now that I have dug in so much organic matter. Still, I would like to be the guy on youtube who talks very loudly and shows off his produce and then let us know that he uses tons of top soil ordered online as the weeding from the manure and garden soil has driven me insane. I looked at my other neighbour's garden and wonder why his garden is so well-weeded. I then realised that he had top soil added from shops.

SR: I wish I had known this HugelKulture earlier. Shame I had to burn all my lovingly cut logs.
 
Joined
Oct 9, 2017
Messages
1,219
Reaction score
1,602
Location
Warrenton North Carolina
Hardiness Zone
7b
Country
United States
alp, I have enough fallen trees to last me for a couple hundred years at least. I am going to do some side by side experimenting with Hugelkulture over the next two growing seasons except I won't be planting in mounds. I will then decide if it is worth the extra work. Since a lot of my soil is little more than orange clay, it seems like it would have to help.
 

alp

Joined
Mar 20, 2017
Messages
14,649
Reaction score
14,134
Location
Essex
Hardiness Zone
9b
Country
United Kingdom
alp, I have enough fallen trees to last me for a couple hundred years at least. I am going to do some side by side experimenting with Hugelkulture over the next two growing seasons except I won't be planting in mounds. I will then decide if it is worth the extra work. Since a lot of my soil is little more than orange clay, it seems like it would have to help.
Do people sell their logs where you live? Here, my eyes watered when I saw the ridiculous prices people paid to get their kindling logs. Not even logs, but bits. And they bought 3 bags or 4 bags. Don't people buy logs to build houses? Here we have programmes showing people buying up newly felled oak tree to build their A frames! So do you have a big fireplace then? I love the romantic notion, but not so keen cleaning the dust and ashes. My son coughed like hell and I went to the doc and cried why he coughed so badly. The woman said he hadn't developed his immune system:eek::oops:. Ever after that, I just wanted to get rid of the burner. A poor man dismantled it for me for £85 and I then realised we didn't know how to maintain the burner as its lid was sealed up with 7 inches' of soot!:eek::LOL::oops:
 
Joined
Oct 9, 2017
Messages
1,219
Reaction score
1,602
Location
Warrenton North Carolina
Hardiness Zone
7b
Country
United States
Do people sell their logs where you live? Here, my eyes watered when I saw the ridiculous prices people paid to get their kindling logs. Not even logs, but bits. And they bought 3 bags or 4 bags. Don't people buy logs to build houses? Here we have programmes showing people buying up newly felled oak tree to build their A frames! So do you have a big fireplace then? I love the romantic notion, but not so keen cleaning the dust and ashes. My son coughed like hell and I went to the doc and cried why he coughed so badly. The woman said he hadn't developed his immune system:eek::oops:. Ever after that, I just wanted to get rid of the burner. A poor man dismantled it for me for £85 and I then realised we didn't know how to maintain the burner as its lid was sealed up with 7 inches' of soot!:eek::LOL::oops:

In North Carolina logging is huge business. It's hard to drive anywhere in the countryside without seeing log trucks. They are harvesting Southern Pine which is used in the building industry. The hardwoods they just knock down and leave. Many times a large muncher comes in and pulverizes everything. Then they plant nice neat rows of pine saplings. Pine is NOT good for burning in a fireplace. It coats the inside of the chimney with creosote which will catch on fire if it is thick enough. This is why you have chimney sweeps. I have a large fire circle outside but no fireplace in the house. I would rather have my house smell like flowers than burnt wood. :)
 
Joined
Oct 8, 2017
Messages
4,365
Reaction score
3,754
Location
Birmingham Alabama
Hardiness Zone
8a
Country
United States
We quite burning in our brick fireplace some years ago. I have cords and cords of firewood just rotting. It wood be good for hugels I am sure.
 
Ad

Advertisements

alp

Joined
Mar 20, 2017
Messages
14,649
Reaction score
14,134
Location
Essex
Hardiness Zone
9b
Country
United Kingdom
We quite burning in our brick fireplace some years ago. I have cords and cords of firewood just rotting. It wood be good for hugels I am sure.
I bought coir to add to my clay soil. Not any more. Shame that I have so much improved the soil and now I am thinking of up-stick and leave..
 
Joined
Oct 8, 2017
Messages
4,365
Reaction score
3,754
Location
Birmingham Alabama
Hardiness Zone
8a
Country
United States
Well they got planted along the fence line of the garden so they will stay moist in the summer while having a nice full sun. I used a lot of peat and the natural soil, a little rose food and some innoculant. Immediately need to cover as 31f is the expected low next week. I knew I should have waited past the 15th but could not help myself. Pitifully addicted to planting.
 
  • Like
Reactions: alp

alp

Joined
Mar 20, 2017
Messages
14,649
Reaction score
14,134
Location
Essex
Hardiness Zone
9b
Country
United Kingdom
Rose will be OK with 31f. Don't you worry!
 

alp

Joined
Mar 20, 2017
Messages
14,649
Reaction score
14,134
Location
Essex
Hardiness Zone
9b
Country
United Kingdom
Eight clematises: Let me choose for you! Hahaha!

1) Madame Julie Correvon can withstand hard frost. Flower again and again, not burden on the stake, unlike Montana

2) Clematis 'Jackmanii'

3) Princess Kate

4) Durandii

5) Paul Farges

6) Queen of Vine

7) Sieboldii

8) Viennetta
 
Ad

Advertisements

Joined
Oct 8, 2017
Messages
4,365
Reaction score
3,754
Location
Birmingham Alabama
Hardiness Zone
8a
Country
United States
Those are metal stakes and dual wire strands so they can be burdened. Thank you for the insight and knowledge. I really have come to like clamatis in this environment.
 

alp

Joined
Mar 20, 2017
Messages
14,649
Reaction score
14,134
Location
Essex
Hardiness Zone
9b
Country
United Kingdom
Well then, Montana with its beautiful apple blossom scent. It knocked me out for six last year. Every time I walked by my plant, the fragrance is out of this world.

You saw Daren's beautiful arch crown with Armandii - pure bliss!
 
Joined
Oct 8, 2017
Messages
4,365
Reaction score
3,754
Location
Birmingham Alabama
Hardiness Zone
8a
Country
United States
So H5 is long term but H4 is what they would rate us on the USDA 8a zone to UK conversion. I was excited to see the H scale! I had not been exposed to that scale before and now will sort imported plants with better clarity. Thank You!
 
Ad

Advertisements


Ask a Question

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

You'll need to choose a username for the site, which only take a couple of moments. After that, you can post your question and our members will help you out.

Ask a Question

Top