Monstera Deliciosa growing huge stalk without a leaf after cutting


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Hello. I specifically signed up so I could post my inquiry in hopes that someone with experience might have a little insight as to what is happening here. I received this gorgeous, medium sized Monstera Deliciosa as a birthday present from my husband in December. It's growing new leaves regularly, even in the winter here, and I'm so happy with this gorgeous plant! I live in Eastern Washington, USA.

The growers cut back a large stem before sending it to me, which was apparent by the calloused, professional looking cut on the plant. This didn't bother me. After it's first watering in my care, new growth rapidly began pushing out from the place where it was cut back. But it wasn't a leaf tip that was curled up as we normally see initially. It was just the tip of a stem. It's been about 3 weeks and this thing has grown about 2 feet tall! Is this a normal growth pattern for Monsteras after they have been pruned? Based on what I've read, I was under the impression that new growth happens in the form of leaves with stems. I've not seen any examples of this kind of growth anythere in the internet.

Will this leafless stem remain leafless at the top since it is calloused over and will a new leaf grow out of its sheath as normal later on? What causes this to happen? How can I ensure my plant doesn't continue to grow bare stems in the future should I choose to cut it back? Any and all advise /experience is so appreciated! Thank you!

- The pics at the base is where they cut. Of course it wasn't split before, it was just a calloused stump. You can see where the new stalk emerged and has separated from the primary stalk (technical term?).

The last pic is just to show you how beautiful this thing is! And look at that large new leaf that is almost finished unfurling! :)
 

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Welcome to the forum @Tasha1212 :) We find your question very interesting, and have been having a natter about it..... (that is Zigs and I.) That certainly does not appear to be as it should, and we wonder if the growth is actually a strangler fig? If it is, you really need to get rid of it before it kills your lovely healthy plant.
If it were my plant, I would take it out of the pot and remove all of that piece carefully - then re pot when you`re sure it is all removed. Better safe than sorry !
 
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Welcome to the forum @Tasha1212 :) We find your question very interesting, and have been having a natter about it..... (that is Zigs and I.) That certainly does not appear to be as it should, and we wonder if the growth is actually a strangler fig? If it is, you really need to get rid of it before it kills your lovely healthy plant.
If it were my plant, I would take it out of the pot and remove all of that piece carefully - then re pot when you`re sure it is all removed. Better safe than sorry !

Hi Tetters. Thank you for taking the time to reply. I've never heard of strangler fig. What is it and how, if possible, could it have grown as a part of my plant? It doesn't look foreign to the plant, but rather is new growth from the previous stem (cut point) and has the structure of a regular Monstera stalk, just missing the leaf. It even has a closed sheath which I assumed a new leaf would emerge from later on. I do agree to heir on the side of caution, but would need more info and to do more research on this strangler fig and how they affect Monstera before making any sudden moves. If not totally necessary I'd rather not cut it off at this point, even though it's certainly not my favorite part of the plant currently. Do you have any other tidbits that would hint towards this being strangler fig and how this could have happened? Thanks again!
 
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If it is part of the plant (which is more likely) :giggle: I wonder if the previous owner (seller) pruned it back to shape it up a bit?

If that was the case, it will take a while to produce new leaves and patience is a virtue so they say. If this plant is propagated using leafless nodal cuttings they can take ages to leaf. Pruning it back in this way would have the same effect.
These plants can grow very very big - the last one I had reached the ceiling and continued to grow sideways - a bit like the day of the triffids it was :eek:
 
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Yes, it does appear that the grower cut it back before shipment. Perhaps it was too tall to ship, the leaf broke, etc. Since my original post the bare stem has grown another inch or so. If the grower had cut the original petiole further down to a node would it have pushed a leaf out instead? I'm just trying to decide how and where I should cut in the future to avoid more bare stems. I've heard that Monsteras always grow back there you cut them but noone ever explains the how's and why's of it (in my experience so far), or warns of the possibility of this happening. The longer I have this plant the more I will learn, no doubt.

Wow, that must have been quite the plant to reach the ceiling! Sounds like it was quite happy and healthy. Thanks again, Tetters!
 
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It would be most interesting to just leave it for now and see what happens - have fun - and please let us know.
 
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Yes, it does appear that the grower cut it back before shipment. Perhaps it was too tall to ship, the leaf broke, etc. Since my original post the bare stem has grown another inch or so. If the grower had cut the original petiole further down to a node would it have pushed a leaf out instead? I'm just trying to decide how and where I should cut in the future to avoid more bare stems. I've heard that Monsteras always grow back there you cut them but noone ever explains the how's and why's of it (in my experience so far), or warns of the possibility of this happening. The longer I have this plant the more I will learn, no doubt.

Wow, that must have been quite the plant to reach the ceiling! Sounds like it was quite happy and healthy. Thanks again, Tetters!
Hello, I'm having the same issue with a bare stem. How did yours turn out? I'm not sure if I should let it keep growing.
 
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Greetings Cocos Mom, welcome to the Forums.

Please post a some clear photos of the 'stem' you are concerned about.

The photos in the OP, don't show any bare stems on the Monstera deliciosa. I think the original poster was referring to a leaf petiole, best seen in the third photo. It looks like a petiole with an undeveloped or damaged leaf blade.

Petioles are often called 'leaf stems' by laypeople, but a petiole is not a stem, it is part of a leaf.

Most leaves will never branch or produce buds. There are certain quasi-exceptions but these do not apply to Monstera.
 
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Greetings Cocos Mom, welcome to the Forums.

Please post a some clear photos of the 'stem' you are concerned about.

The photos in the OP, don't show any bare stems on the Monstera deliciosa. I think the original poster was referring to a leaf petiole, best seen in the third photo. It looks like a petiole with an undeveloped or damaged leaf blade.

Petioles are often called 'leaf stems' by laypeople, but a petiole is not a stem, it is part of a leaf.

Most leaves will never branch or produce buds. There are certain quasi-exceptions but these do not apply to Monstera.
Hi Marck,

I'm new to plants and this Monstera was given to me as a cutting. The Monstera it came from is very large with big beautiful leaves. I'm completely lost as to what's going on with it. I've read a ton on care and thought I was doing good when I saw it having new growth.

These pictures show the tall "stem", a close-up of it, and the other little "stem" that recently grew. There's also a picture of a leaf that came in looking half burnt. The small "stem" and the burnt leaf came in at the same time.

Thank you for all your help.
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All three of the leaves you mention are damaged. Two do not have any blade, just petiole, and the third has the blade severely damaged. I'm not certain, but it appears that this damage occurs when the leaf is small. It could be a disease issue or it may be due to irregular watering or low humidity. I'm not fully certain. How long have you had this plant?
Review your care for the plant and see if there is anything you can do to improve conditions.

Ceriman (Monstera deliciosa) an Aroid (Araceae) native to southern Mexico and Guatemala.It's preferred care is bright indirect light, moderate to warm temperature, regular water with good drainage, and regular application of fertilizer during active growth.
 
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All three of the leaves you mention are damaged. Two do not have any blade, just petiole, and the third has the blade severely damaged. I'm not certain, but it appears that this damage occurs when the leaf is small. It could be a disease issue or it may be due to irregular watering or low humidity. I'm not fully certain. How long have you had this plant?
Review your care for the plant and see if there is anything you can do to improve conditions.

Ceriman (Monstera deliciosa) an Aroid (Araceae) native to southern Mexico and Guatemala.It's preferred care is bright indirect light, moderate to warm temperature, regular water with good drainage, and regular application of fertilizer during active growth.

Thank you! I'll double check my setup and track the watering better.

Should I cut the petiole's off?
 
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It isn't crucial to remove them, but if you find them unattractive, then you certainly may do so.
 

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