Molasses the wonder drug


Joined
Feb 2, 2014
Messages
7,828
Reaction score
3,765
Location
Tarpley Tx
Hardiness Zone
8b
Country
United States
Is your garden spot just not doing as well as it once did? Is your soil tired and run down? Has your lawn turned hard and your grass all sickly looking no matter what you do. Let not your heart be troubled. There is an organic cure for these and and other symptoms in your landscape, plus it tastes good too. Seriously, molasses is one of the most important tools in the organic tool box. It has myriad uses but where it really shines is an additive to your soil. What it does is it jump starts and feeds the microbial life in your soil, the tiny microscopic organisms that break down the organic material in your soil into the trace elements that your plants need to grow. You can usually find horticultural molasses at the better nursuries and where they sell cattle feed but you can also get it at the grocery store although it costs more there because it is food grade. They basic rule of thumb is to mix about 2 oz per gallon of water and either use a watering can or a hose end sprayer and apply enough to get the soil wet but not soaked. Let the rain deliver it deep. Also molasses comes in a dry form also that works very well in a lawn fertilizer spreader.
 
Ad

Advertisements

Joined
Mar 26, 2013
Messages
2,738
Reaction score
1,157
Location
Cheshire
Country
United Kingdom
I cannot find it being sold for horticultural purposes here in the UK, but the cheapest way to buy it is as a horse supplement or for fishing.
Would either/both be suitable?
 
Joined
Feb 2, 2014
Messages
7,828
Reaction score
3,765
Location
Tarpley Tx
Hardiness Zone
8b
Country
United States
I cannot find it being sold for horticultural purposes here in the UK, but the cheapest way to buy it is as a horse supplement or for fishing.
Would either/both be suitable?
I don't know how fishing relates to molasses but here it is sold as a supplement for cattle and horses As long as it is molasses and has had nothing added to it, it should be fine. You might talk to the nurseries about it. I am sure they can get it. They probably have never heard about it
 
Joined
Mar 26, 2013
Messages
2,738
Reaction score
1,157
Location
Cheshire
Country
United Kingdom
I don't know how fishing relates to molasses but here it is sold as a supplement for cattle and horses As long as it is molasses and has had nothing added to it, it should be fine. You might talk to the nurseries about it. I am sure they can get it. They probably have never heard about it
Do you mean "unsulphured" molasses?
 
Ad

Advertisements

Joined
Mar 27, 2012
Messages
4,220
Reaction score
2,700
Hardiness Zone
9a
Country
United Kingdom
Like @headfullofbees mentioned, molasses doesn't seem to be commonly used in the UK so it's not something we've tried before. Looks like it would be easy enough to get hold of some though, so I'd very much like to give it a go. Would you apply it to all soil in your garden or are there some plants which don't like it? Also, we have some flower beds which are covered in slate chippings, have you ever tried using it on that? I'd be a little worried that it would make the stones sticky and dirty.
 
Joined
Feb 2, 2014
Messages
7,828
Reaction score
3,765
Location
Tarpley Tx
Hardiness Zone
8b
Country
United States
Do you mean "unsulphured" molasses?
Yes, un
Like @headfullofbees mentioned, molasses doesn't seem to be commonly used in the UK so it's not something we've tried before. Looks like it would be easy enough to get hold of some though, so I'd very much like to give it a go. Would you apply it to all soil in your garden or are there some plants which don't like it? Also, we have some flower beds which are covered in slate chippings, have you ever tried using it on that? I'd be a little worried that it would make the stones sticky and dirty.
You can and should use molasses everywhere you can. It is a carbohydrate and is safe for everything. When you mix molasses with water, usually about 2 oz per gallon it isn't sticky at all, but if you are still a little uncomfortable just give the slates a little rinse.
 
Joined
Mar 26, 2013
Messages
2,738
Reaction score
1,157
Location
Cheshire
Country
United Kingdom
I've just found BioBuzz which is molasses-based at £7 ($13) a litre, or horse-feed molasses at £2 a litre, both online.
Chuck, I've bought the molasses and I'm going to give it a go, using it both, as you suggest, and as an ingredient in my actively aerated compost tea.
 
Joined
Feb 2, 2014
Messages
7,828
Reaction score
3,765
Location
Tarpley Tx
Hardiness Zone
8b
Country
United States
I've just found BioBuzz which is molasses-based at £7 ($13) a litre, or horse-feed molasses at £2 a litre, both online.
Chuck, I've bought the molasses and I'm going to give it a go, using it both, as you suggest, and as an ingredient in my actively aerated compost tea.
I sure hope you bought the horse feed molasses
 
Ad

Advertisements

Joined
Apr 30, 2014
Messages
51
Reaction score
8
Hardiness Zone
11b
Country
Philippines
This sounds like something we should do when the rainy season comes along. It's too dry now for it to really get into the soil. One thing though: won't that increase the ant population?
 
Joined
Feb 2, 2014
Messages
7,828
Reaction score
3,765
Location
Tarpley Tx
Hardiness Zone
8b
Country
United States
This sounds like something we should do when the rainy season comes along. It's too dry now for it to really get into the soil. One thing though: won't that increase the ant population?
I haven't found that to be the case here and it is reduced to a 1 in 64 ratio so I doubt the ants would even notice
 

Pat

Joined
Oct 12, 2012
Messages
1,878
Reaction score
563
Location
Maryland
Country
United States
There is a home improvement show that comes on where the garden person suggestion a compost tea that has molasses as one of the ingredents but he never said not to use household molasses, I did not know there is a molasses for horses.
I would like to add some molasses to our soil as it has been neglected for years.
 
Joined
Feb 2, 2014
Messages
7,828
Reaction score
3,765
Location
Tarpley Tx
Hardiness Zone
8b
Country
United States
There is a home improvement show that comes on where the garden person suggestion a compost tea that has molasses as one of the ingredents but he never said not to use household molasses, I did not know there is a molasses for horses.
I would like to add some molasses to our soil as it has been neglected for years.
You can use household molasses. The only drawback is that it is more expensive than horticultural or agricultural molasses.
 
Joined
Dec 11, 2014
Messages
2,269
Reaction score
834
Location
Brantford,ON
Hardiness Zone
Zone 5
Country
Canada
Molasses horticulture use is right up there with up-side-down tomato planters, vertical potato growing in tires, drip watering, growing celery in water, tooth fairies, shamrock plants, and spooks. Shake thy head folks.
 
Ad

Advertisements

Joined
Feb 2, 2014
Messages
7,828
Reaction score
3,765
Location
Tarpley Tx
Hardiness Zone
8b
Country
United States
Molasses horticulture use is right up there with up-side-down tomato planters, vertical potato growing in tires, drip watering, growing celery in water, tooth fairies, shamrock plants, and spooks. Shake thy head folks.
Well, having used it side by side with numerous plant types and varieties I can attest that it does work. I have no photos, fudged, photoshopped or otherwise to show you. You have preconceived notions and no matter what you refuse to come off of your high horse even when shown. Your act is getting old quick dude.
 
Joined
Sep 29, 2012
Messages
3,409
Reaction score
1,097
Location
Louisiana
Hardiness Zone
9b
Country
United States
So, molasses acts like a plant food? Or more like a supplement to help plants absorb nutrients? How often do you use it in the garden? Is it just for the jumpstart in spring or should it be reapplied on a regular basis? Is there any drawback? Can you use too much of it? (I too worry about ants, but if you say so...)
 
Ad

Advertisements

Joined
Feb 2, 2014
Messages
7,828
Reaction score
3,765
Location
Tarpley Tx
Hardiness Zone
8b
Country
United States
So, molasses acts like a plant food? Or more like a supplement to help plants absorb nutrients? How often do you use it in the garden? Is it just for the jumpstart in spring or should it be reapplied on a regular basis? Is there any drawback? Can you use too much of it? (I too worry about ants, but if you say so...)
Molasses does not do anything directly for plants. Molasses stimulates the growth of soil microbes and bacteria in the soil although molasses does contain a small amount of nitrogen and minerals. The microbes are what break down the organic matter in the soil and that in turn feeds the plants. One does not need to use molasses on a continuing regular basis, but should be applied whenever you add more organic matter to your soil or when you make aerated compost tea. When applying directly to the soil you should use about 2 oz per gallon of water. In aerated compost 1-2 oz per 5 gallon bucket.

Molasses has just now, in the last few years, began to be used commercially in large scale soil remediation projects such as toxic waste dump sites and in instances of contaminated ground water where the soil was leaching heavy metals and other contaminates into water supplies. Before this it was used to rejuvenate burned out farmland which was caused by the overuse of chemical fertilizers which left a large mineral salt buildup which drastically curtailed production.


And no, ants will not be a problem
 
Last edited:

Ask a Question

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

You'll need to choose a username for the site, which only take a couple of moments. After that, you can post your question and our members will help you out.

Ask a Question

Top