Mock strawberries?


Joined
Sep 11, 2021
Messages
66
Reaction score
53
Location
Sydney
Country
Australia
Hello!

I saw an ad on gumtree (local classifieds) where a guy was selling alpine strawberry plants.

I went ahead and bought a couple of trays since they were only a couple of dollars. Even if i accidentally killed them, I was losing much in terms of investment.

When I went home, I did some research on alpine strawberries, I had read that alpine strawberries do not usually send out runners, whereas the plants I bought did. Today I noticed that the flower petals were bright yellow, which I had never seen before. Turns out they were “mock strawberries”. Has anyone seen these before/confirm what they are?

Here is a photo of the yellow petals, and a photo of the fruit from the ad which was posted on gum tree.
 

Attachments

  • 96021CE1-C436-4A95-9CD3-017E4DB6BA67.jpeg
    96021CE1-C436-4A95-9CD3-017E4DB6BA67.jpeg
    260.1 KB · Views: 20
  • 5122D3FD-5AF3-4511-9B91-A5C43F6C5425.png
    5122D3FD-5AF3-4511-9B91-A5C43F6C5425.png
    235.9 KB · Views: 25
Ad

Advertisements

Joined
Aug 10, 2021
Messages
4,225
Reaction score
1,474
Location
California
Country
United States
Yes, this is Mock-strawberry (Potentilla indica, formerly Duchesnea indica) in the Rose Family (Rosaceae). Also known as Indian Strawberry, this yellow-flowered ground-cover is native to southern and eastern Asia, Sri Lanka, Philippines, Hainan, Taiwan, and Japan.
The fruit are edible, but the taste and texture do not compare with true strawberries (Fragaria spp.).
 
Ad

Advertisements

Joined
Feb 13, 2021
Messages
1,276
Reaction score
863
Country
United Kingdom
Strawberries are interesting, there are an awful lot of them world wide. The original English strawberries made small fruit, like alpine strawberries, but also made runners. The one grown traditionally as a strawberry was a hybrid that was discovered in France, it is a cross between a North American one that grows in open woodland and a South American one that grows in coastal scrub land. When it was discovered in the 1600's the French monarch sent some to King Charles in England, he thought them good, but he still made sure that a lot of English strawberry runners were planted, the berries are tiny, but have much more taste, and if you are a King you don't have to pick them. Over the last thirty years or so I have been seeing other hybrids turning up, ones you can grow all year round, trailing ones for hanging baskets etc. but although they have their enthusiasts none of them appear very convincing so far. Still, like I say there are a lot to experiment with, someone may well turn up the 'wonder' strawberry one day.
 

Ask a Question

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

You'll need to choose a username for the site, which only take a couple of moments. After that, you can post your question and our members will help you out.

Ask a Question

Top