Melon leaf issues, possible alternatia leaf blight?


Joined
May 11, 2020
Messages
35
Reaction score
2
Location
Falmouth, MA
Hardiness Zone
7a
Country
United States
Plants looked completely healthy with no issues at all up until about three weeks ago, in the early stages of fruit production: Yellow/brown spotting of the leaves and death of some leaves, much worse near the crown of the plants, as shown in the below pics. The fruits seem to be doing ok for now.

Second year growing canteloupes in the same area - trying a different variety this year but noticed something similar last year. Probably not the best idea to have grown in the same spot if this is indeed alternaria

Does this look like any particular issue or disease, bacterial or fungal? Was thinking Alternaria leaf blight but not sure.

Are there practices or certain conditions that might be contributing to whatever this is - maybe simply overwatering? Since I've layered black plastic sheeting across the plot, I'm worried that the lack of drainage / aeration on the surface is contributing to this.
 

Attachments

  • PXL_20210813_125626366.jpg
    PXL_20210813_125626366.jpg
    275.2 KB · Views: 11
  • PXL_20210813_125637907.jpg
    PXL_20210813_125637907.jpg
    265 KB · Views: 12
  • PXL_20210813_125642657.jpg
    PXL_20210813_125642657.jpg
    293.7 KB · Views: 12
  • PXL_20210813_125656283.jpg
    PXL_20210813_125656283.jpg
    256 KB · Views: 10
Ad

Advertisements

Joined
Aug 10, 2021
Messages
901
Reaction score
321
Location
California
Country
United States
I could not say with certainty, but I agree the symptom looks right: brown necrotic spots with yellow halos around them.
 
Joined
Feb 2, 2014
Messages
9,511
Reaction score
4,437
Location
Tarpley Tx
Hardiness Zone
8b
Country
United States
Looks like alternia but did you spray with something white? Looks like downy or powdery mildew on a bunch of the leaves. If it is a mildew this is more serious than alternia as it will affect the fruit too.
 
Joined
May 11, 2020
Messages
35
Reaction score
2
Location
Falmouth, MA
Hardiness Zone
7a
Country
United States
Looks like alternia but did you spray with something white? Looks like downy or powdery mildew on a bunch of the leaves. If it is a mildew this is more serious than alternia as it will affect the fruit too.

Yes, I'm pretty sure this is powdery mildew unfortunately. Caught this a bit late, but I'm now attempting to treat this by spraying a mix of baking soda and neem oil since that's what I have on hand.
 
Joined
May 11, 2020
Messages
35
Reaction score
2
Location
Falmouth, MA
Hardiness Zone
7a
Country
United States
Don't forget that Neem has a limited shelf life
Thanks a lot Chuck. Since I saw your comment on my tomato post, could there be a connection between early tomato blight and these melon issues? Wondering if I'm dealing with the same fungus affecting both plants or are these altogether separate issues.
 
Ad

Advertisements

Joined
Feb 2, 2014
Messages
9,511
Reaction score
4,437
Location
Tarpley Tx
Hardiness Zone
8b
Country
United States
Thanks a lot Chuck. Since I saw your comment on my tomato post, could there be a connection between early tomato blight and these melon issues? Wondering if I'm dealing with the same fungus affecting both plants or are these altogether separate issues.
There are numerous blights/leaf spot diseases that affect garden crops. There is early blight, bacterial leaf spot, septoria, alternaria, anthracnose leaf spot and others. And basically, they all look the same, brown spot yellow halo, plain spots, large areas of dead leaf, etc. Depending on where you're located depends on how you address the problem. Where I live the tomato harvest is over before a blight kills the plant but I still have to control the problem. The key to almost all of the blights/leaf spot diseases is prevention. It really makes no difference as to what the disease is, the outcome is what counts. You must control the disease until harvest. Once a plant has one of these diseases it is only a matter of time before the plant succumbs to it. Actually I don't know if a complete cure is even possible. You probably have the same disease on both types of plants and the treatment is the same on each. Neem, baking soda, milk, copper sprays and synthetic fungicides are used mainly but none of them AFAIK offers a cure once the diseases is apparent. All they do is offer you time to harvest.
 
Joined
May 11, 2020
Messages
35
Reaction score
2
Location
Falmouth, MA
Hardiness Zone
7a
Country
United States
There are numerous blights/leaf spot diseases that affect garden crops. There is early blight, bacterial leaf spot, septoria, alternaria, anthracnose leaf spot and others. And basically, they all look the same, brown spot yellow halo, plain spots, large areas of dead leaf, etc. Depending on where you're located depends on how you address the problem. Where I live the tomato harvest is over before a blight kills the plant but I still have to control the problem. The key to almost all of the blights/leaf spot diseases is prevention. It really makes no difference as to what the disease is, the outcome is what counts. You must control the disease until harvest. Once a plant has one of these diseases it is only a matter of time before the plant succumbs to it. Actually I don't know if a complete cure is even possible. You probably have the same disease on both types of plants and the treatment is the same on each. Neem, baking soda, milk, copper sprays and synthetic fungicides are used mainly but none of them AFAIK offers a cure once the diseases is apparent. All they do is offer you time to harvest.
Thank you! I'm on cape cod MA, zone 7a. In doing some research I've read that watering in the evening is to be avoided for crops susceptible to blight, which I'm guilty of on occasion.

I'm realizing that I'll have to be pretty vigilant in future seasons in terms of proactively spraying in an attempt at broad sprectrum prevention or to your point delaying the inevitable.
 
Ad

Advertisements

Joined
Feb 2, 2014
Messages
9,511
Reaction score
4,437
Location
Tarpley Tx
Hardiness Zone
8b
Country
United States
Thank you! I'm on cape cod MA, zone 7a. In doing some research I've read that watering in the evening is to be avoided for crops susceptible to blight, which I'm guilty of on occasion.

I'm realizing that I'll have to be pretty vigilant in future seasons in terms of proactively spraying in an attempt at broad sprectrum prevention or to your point delaying the inevitable.
I would have to say that mulching and removing affected parts are actually more effective than sprays, at least in my neck of the woods.
 

Ask a Question

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

You'll need to choose a username for the site, which only take a couple of moments. After that, you can post your question and our members will help you out.

Ask a Question

Top