Mango Tree wilting after move


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Hello all,

I had a question regarding my mango tree.

It was moved from one part of my garden to another.

Since the move, it has been regularly watered and extra soil placed on top to keep any roots from showing.

However, it has wilted heavily. Basically all the leaves. The tree was also damaged during the move with the skin of the stem of the tree being (roughly 30%) taken off. Since winter has arrived in Australia, I fear about winter and frost complicating matters further.

I have considered putting it back to its original place.

Are there methods one can utilize to halt the wilt or atleast correct part of the damage. Unfortunately, I feel there isn't much I can action to keep it healthy in the place of the garden the tree is in.
 
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Hello all,

I had a question regarding my mango tree.

It was moved from one part of my garden to another.

Since the move, it has been regularly watered and extra soil placed on top to keep any roots from showing.

However, it has wilted heavily. Basically all the leaves. The tree was also damaged during the move with the skin of the stem of the tree being (roughly 30%) taken off. Since winter has arrived in Australia, I fear about winter and frost complicating matters further.

I have considered putting it back to its original place.

Are there methods one can utilize to halt the wilt or atleast correct part of the damage. Unfortunately, I feel there isn't much I can action to keep it healthy in the place of the garden the tree is in.
How often are you watering? You said 30% of the skin/bark is gone. Is that 30% of the diameter or the length of the trunk? The tops of the roots or the root flare should be visible. My first thought is transplant shock and the tree will grow out of it if you aren't watering too often. Losing 30% of the diameter will cause shock. Losing 30% of the total bark on the trunk will cause severe if not fatal shock. Putting the tree back will only cause more shock. How long since transplanting? How cold are your winters?
 
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Hi Chuck,

Thank you for your reply.

Is has about a 3 weeks since it was moved. Late autumn basically.

The bark has actually been lost unfortunately. The sapwood (i believe is what it is called) is showing. I will submit a picture of it to detail the exact extent of the damage that was caused. Currently I do not have a picture of it at the moment.

Winter in Sydney is a bit harsh. Averages in the middle parts of winter drop to below 10 degrees centigrade. But 15 is an average otherwise.

Initially I thought transplant shock as well but I relocated other trees at the same period (not mangoes) and they were fine, no wilting.

The root showing, do you mean part of the root ball at the base of the trunk?
 
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Hi Chuck,

Thank you for your reply.

Is has about a 3 weeks since it was moved. Late autumn basically.

The bark has actually been lost unfortunately. The sapwood (i believe is what it is called) is showing. I will submit a picture of it to detail the exact extent of the damage that was caused. Currently I do not have a picture of it at the moment.

Winter in Sydney is a bit harsh. Averages in the middle parts of winter drop to below 10 degrees centigrade. But 15 is an average otherwise.

Initially I thought transplant shock as well but I relocated other trees at the same period (not mangoes) and they were fine, no wilting.

The root showing, do you mean part of the root ball at the base of the trunk?
Mangos are tropical and 10C is on the verge of harming them. How large is this tree, what size is the container and how often do you water?
 
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It is about 2m tall. The trunk is about 30cm in diameter.

Has been consistently been bearing fruit past 4 years. Watering before transplant once a month. Now since transplant, twice a week.
 
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It is about 2m tall. The trunk is about 30cm in diameter.

Has been consistently been bearing fruit past 4 years. Watering before transplant once a month. Now since transplant, twice a week.
Twice a week is too much if you are properly watering. When you water water very slowly, deeply and thoroughly. Then when the soil is DRY about 3-4 inches deep water again. It may be 7-14 days depending on your soil type. Google root flare
 
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That looks mangled. it is the size of your thigh. If you lost that much skin and somebody sprinkled you with water would you care?
 
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The image uploaded is the damage I mentioned.

Noted that I will need to remove the soil around the base as the root flare is not visible
The tree will survive but will never be like it should. I had a peach tree that a porcupine ate the bark, in many ways just like your tree. I managed to save the tree but it never again produced properly and was always in some type of peril. Either insects or some type of disease. It stayed in a weakened state. You would be money and time ahead to replace it.
 
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Shame to hear that mate. downer that a prized piece of the garden would be taken away from its prime in such a manner.

Atleast in your case it was an act completely out of your hands and not human error. Oddly enough, i rarely see gardens raveged by rodent like creatures in my city but it does occur i'm sure.

Appreciate the guide and direction as well as tips Chuck.

Its a matter of time before I find a tree similar to my current one in a nursery near my city. Hopefully it will bear fruits as my current one did.
 
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