Lower Soil PH


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What is the best way to lower my soil PH? At the moment, I am watering my blueberries, myer lemon, and tangerine plants with 2 gallons of water - added 2 tbs of distille vinegar per gallon/water each week. In addition, I've use the soil acidifier fertilizer from the store, but it does not appear to make a difference. I got some sulfur from Amazon; I applied it to one plant in a pot, but the PH has not changes in a month.
 
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What is the best way to lower my soil PH? At the moment, I am watering my blueberries, myer lemon, and tangerine plants with 2 gallons of water - added 2 tbs of distille vinegar per gallon/water each week. In addition, I've use the soil acidifier fertilizer from the store, but it does not appear to make a difference. I got some sulfur from Amazon; I applied it to one plant in a pot, but the PH has not changes in a month.
Not the answer you are looking for, but SLOWLY. You are experiencing what is called the buffer. Depending in how that soil was made, a certain mass of material is in use, which you are attempting to counteract with small sips of chemicals in water. Dumping a bunch of one fell swoop action on a root system is going to produce an intensely acid layer which can easily blunt root tips and otherwise muck up the process. Using sulphur or aluminum sulphate or vinegar or whichever, the calender is important, because while you want to move along in the process, you also want to make small changes over time to prevent the neighbors from gossiping about you while succinctly arriving at your goal. This is also true of liming and raising the pH. It is important to know if these plants are all in the ground or just the one in a pot? The sulphur is broken down by the enzyme action of the biodome, as well as oxidation. A potting soil is a poor medium for natural processes.
 
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My tangerine is in ground, but it has struggled so much that I started planting the other citrus and fruit plants in containers. They are all around 6.5 and 7.5PH.
 
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My tangerine is in ground, but it has struggled so much that I started planting the other citrus and fruit plants in containers. They are all around 6.5 and 7.5PH.
It is just about impossible or is impossible to permanently change a soils Ph from acid to neutral or alkaline to neutral or acidic. And 99% of the time, every time you water you are using either acidic or alkaline water which depends on which soil you have.
 
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I agree with Chuck. Scientifically there is very little difference to the readings of th pH scale that affects us gardeners. It is only when entering the higher echelons of soil sciences that for instance a reading of 6.5 & 7.0 For whatever purpose, albeit 7.0pH is accepted as neuteral.. I have for many years wondered about this. Why? Here in the UK. Areas like the South Downs, Isle of Wight etc have great displays of acid loving shrubs, Azaleas and rhododnedrons. Yet in so many areas the soil depth is but a few inches, then below this level is solid chalk.

So cutting it short. To some extent. You can add more green vegative compost. Dig it in. Be cautious as to using chemical suggestions. Perhaps a good idea is to be more selective when obtaining your plants. Without entering the lecture hall and opening up the realms of plant sciences. We need to take into account, the world around us. The changes that a storm can leave behind. Sorry. I'll leave it there.
 
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One note about water. Tap water is treated in no small part to prevent it from being acidic. It turns out that distilled water (6pH) can attack metal, as in the copper pipes of my home. Perhaps distilled, or rainwater caught for the purpose, would be of some good use. Also, there are some calculators for how much sulfur to use, I have used one at garden.org. Fair warning, 6 months wait is realistic.
 
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