Jerusalem artichoke


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Anyone grow this? Experience? Have been thinking of starting one. it works in my zone nicely. And looks like the flower is interesting. Yes, I would eat them.

The Jerusalem artichoke (Helianthus tuberosus), also called sunroot, sunchoke, or earth apple, is a species of sunflower native to central North America. It is also cultivated widely across the temperate zone for its tuber, which is used as a root vegetable .

Thanks,
 
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Yes, have them in my garden. Suggest you plant where you want them to live from now until eternity. It is difficult to find all the tubers in my experience, but I am a pretty lazy gardener. I also grow them for their tall stalks of yellow fall flowers. Being raised to prepare for everything I consider chokes a doomsday food. Mainly because I would have to be starving to go to the trouble of cleaning them to eat. There are varieties that are smoother and more easily prepared for eating so it might be worthwhile to seek those varieties out. They do have a nice crunchy sweet and starchy flavor. I haven’t tried cooking them but should. (Like I said it’s the cleaning thing) Imagine cooked they could substitute for a starchy veggie. Have used radishes and parsnips for a potato substitute with success for soups and scalloped “potatoes“. Cheese and sausage make all veggies taste pretty good;);)
 
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Joined
Mar 28, 2015
Messages
3,632
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3,277
Location
Southern Chester County, PA, USA
Hardiness Zone
4 to 5 best for success.
Country
United States
Yes, have them in my garden. Suggest you plant where you want them to live from now until eternity. It is difficult to find all the tubers in my experience, but I am a pretty lazy gardener. I also grow them for their tall stalks of yellow fall flowers. Being raised to prepare for everything I consider chokes a doomsday food. Mainly because I would have to be starving to go to the trouble of cleaning them to eat. There are varieties that are smoother and more easily prepared for eating so it might be worthwhile to seek those varieties out. They do have a nice crunchy sweet and starchy flavor. I haven’t tried cooking them but should. (Like I said it’s the cleaning thing) Imagine cooked they could substitute for a starchy veggie. Have used radishes and parsnips for a potato substitute with success for soups and scalloped “potatoes“. Cheese and sausage make all veggies taste pretty good;);)
thanks glad you told me about the varieties , I will seek out the various ones to get the smoother type. I have some areas where they can just do their thing to not worry about spreading.
 

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