Is the sun getting hotter?


Joined
Oct 9, 2017
Messages
1,123
Reaction score
1,536
Location
Warrenton North Carolina
Hardiness Zone
7b
Country
United States
Is it just my imagination or was summer 2019 the summer of the burning sun. I have several younger trees in the yard that have scorched leaves for the first time. I could not move my bonsai trees to full sun without leaves being burned. I used to put them in full sun in Florida and not have problems. I noticed that a lot of the farmers in our area have burned corn and tobacco and will have little to no harvest this year. We have had plenty of rain so that’s not the problem. Did anyone else have problems this year?
 
Ad

Advertisements

Joined
Mar 22, 2017
Messages
661
Reaction score
1,367
Location
Calgary Alberta canada
Hardiness Zone
4b
Country
Canada
Enough rain here in Alberta, we always have intense sun during the summer but I noticed some scorched leaves on my pagoda dogwood that I planted in part shade just this spring, not bad scorching but I was a bit surprised. I spend so much time outside, never use sunscreen, and never seem to burn, must be that Cree blood in me.
 
Joined
Feb 2, 2014
Messages
7,362
Reaction score
3,583
Location
Tarpley Tx
Hardiness Zone
8b
Country
United States
Please don't say that. The Global Warming Crowd will blame us gardeners for it. It's all those polluting roto-tillers they'll say.

Really, I think all it is was that most of the summer most of us were under high atmospheric pressure. I know that where I live we had the third longest run of days 100+F in recorded history and the entire time we were under high pressure.
 
Joined
Mar 10, 2017
Messages
1,101
Reaction score
902
Location
NW Florida
Hardiness Zone
8
Country
United States
Actually, it is getting hotter (the sun), by some infinitesimally tiny fraction of a percect a year (6% every billion years). So yeah, global warming.

Note: I have no idea why that useless tidbit is bouncing around in my head. No doubt I've forgotten a birthday or two to make room for it!
 
Joined
Jan 5, 2017
Messages
931
Reaction score
895
Location
Atlantic Beach, Fl
Hardiness Zone
9a
Country
United States
I had a major problem with plants getting burned this year, which was a very hot year, but it's not the heat, it is the sun's rays that was the problem. There's a big difference there, that I don't think most appreciate.

EDIT: BTW, my biggest problem was from a Sparkleberry (Vaccinium arboreum)I planted this year that lost its leaves twice from burning, but after covering the plant during the afternoon, it grew them back, but is not looking very healthy now.

I know it was the sun's rays that did this, but I'm also wondering if this "native" plant might have its origins up in the northern regions of its range, thereby not having the genetics to deal with the more intense rays of Florida's sun.../???
 
Last edited:
Ad

Advertisements

Joined
Oct 8, 2017
Messages
3,717
Reaction score
3,418
Location
Birmingham Alabama
Hardiness Zone
8a
Country
United States
Enough rain here in Alberta, we always have intense sun during the summer but I noticed some scorched leaves on my pagoda dogwood that I planted in part shade just this spring, not bad scorching but I was a bit surprised. I spend so much time outside, never use sunscreen, and never seem to burn, must be that Cree blood in me.
I watered so much you should call me Noah!
 

Ask a Question

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

You'll need to choose a username for the site, which only take a couple of moments. After that, you can post your question and our members will help you out.

Ask a Question

Top