Is a ripe habanero orange?


Joined
Apr 20, 2020
Messages
12
Reaction score
0
Country
United States
Is a ripe habanero orange?

They started out as green.

RipeHabaneros.png
RipeHabaneros.png
 
Ad

Advertisements

Joined
Apr 20, 2020
Messages
12
Reaction score
0
Country
United States
Thanks.

I like them spicy.

Do Carolina Reapers need a similar growing environment?

Andy
 
Joined
Apr 20, 2020
Messages
12
Reaction score
0
Country
United States
They can be orange, red or dark brown when ripe. It depends on the variety. Grow Carolina Reapers or any super hot in the same type of environment.
How do I know when to pick them?
 
Joined
Feb 2, 2014
Messages
8,530
Reaction score
3,988
Location
Tarpley Tx
Hardiness Zone
8b
Country
United States
How do I know when to pick them?
You can pick them when they are green but they are much much better fully ripe. Yours are fully ripe if they are the orange variety and yours appears to be an orange variety. So pick one and take a big bite and tell me how flavorful it is.:D
 
Ad

Advertisements

Joined
Apr 20, 2020
Messages
12
Reaction score
0
Country
United States
You can pick them when they are green but they are much much better fully ripe. Yours are fully ripe if they are the orange variety and yours appears to be an orange variety. So pick one and take a big bite and tell me how flavorful it is.:D
I can send you one so you can take a big bite.
:)
 
Joined
Apr 5, 2020
Messages
32
Reaction score
4
Yes, ripe Habaneros are orange, except for a few novelty cultivated varieties. But the plant in the photo is not a Habanero. It's a Scotch Bonnet Pepper, native to Jamaica. You can tell by the shape of the fruit. See how it's unique shape looks a bit like a Scottish tam o'shanter hat?

Both are part of the Capsicum Chinense family, as are the Trinidad Scorpion, Ghost pepper, and Carolina Reaper. They are the hottest family of peppers. Habaneros are regular short smoother shaped peppers. You are lucky to have Scotch Bonnets! Theoretically their total heat range is similar to Habaneros but they are typically hotter. (Up to 350,0000 Scoville units or more verses say Jalapenos only up to 8,000.) In addition to heat Scotch Bonnets have more flavor than plain Habaneros and are used in Jamaica and throughout the Caribbean, especially in Jerk Chicken, Peas and Rice (actually red beans) and other well known dishes. They come in Yellow/Orange, Red and Green colors. I grow them just to make Jerk dishes, peas and rice, braised oxtail and other Jamaican dishes for which I have a number of my own authentic versions of recipes. (No, I'm not Jamaican but we go there often - 14 years and counting.) You can also use Scotch Bonnets in place of Habaneros. Since they are seasonal and rarely available in store in most of the USA, I dry excess peppers or make batches of Jerk marinade sauce to freeze. I also grow Bell Peppers, Jalapenos, Scorpions, Ghosts and Tabasco/Thai chilis - not grown a Reaper yet, but it's on my to do list.
 
Ad

Advertisements

Joined
Apr 20, 2020
Messages
12
Reaction score
0
Country
United States
Yes, ripe Habaneros are orange, except for a few novelty cultivated varieties. But the plant in the photo is not a Habanero. It's a Scotch Bonnet Pepper, native to Jamaica. You can tell by the shape of the fruit. See how it's unique shape looks a bit like a Scottish tam o'shanter hat?

Both are part of the Capsicum Chinense family, as are the Trinidad Scorpion, Ghost pepper, and Carolina Reaper. They are the hottest family of peppers. Habaneros are regular short smoother shaped peppers. You are lucky to have Scotch Bonnets! Theoretically their total heat range is similar to Habaneros but they are typically hotter. (Up to 350,0000 Scoville units or more verses say Jalapenos only up to 8,000.) In addition to heat Scotch Bonnets have more flavor than plain Habaneros and are used in Jamaica and throughout the Caribbean, especially in Jerk Chicken, Peas and Rice (actually red beans) and other well known dishes. They come in Yellow/Orange, Red and Green colors. I grow them just to make Jerk dishes, peas and rice, braised oxtail and other Jamaican dishes for which I have a number of my own authentic versions of recipes. (No, I'm not Jamaican but we go there often - 14 years and counting.) You can also use Scotch Bonnets in place of Habaneros. Since they are seasonal and rarely available in store in most of the USA, I dry excess peppers or make batches of Jerk marinade sauce to freeze. I also grow Bell Peppers, Jalapenos, Scorpions, Ghosts and Tabasco/Thai chilis - not grown a Reaper yet, but it's on my to do list.
Thanks for the info.

I bought the plant from Home Depot and it was labeled as a habanero.

My peppers are much larger that the habaneros in my local Kroger.

I have a friend who makes and sells hot sauce.

He tried the reapers but said they were too hot for him.
 

Ask a Question

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

You'll need to choose a username for the site, which only take a couple of moments. After that, you can post your question and our members will help you out.

Ask a Question

Top