Indoor olive tree.


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Hey all.

I bought an olive tree from a reputable garden shop and was told I could house it indoors. It is well established and I was advised to water weekly. The tree has been shedding its leaves over the last few weeks. I have had conflicting advise from websites and I’m unsure what to do. It cost me £145.99 and I’d rather it not die.
 

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Hey all.

I bought an olive tree from a reputable garden shop and was told I could house it indoors. It is well established and I was advised to water weekly. The tree has been shedding its leaves over the last few weeks. I have had conflicting advise from websites and I’m unsure what to do. It cost me £145.99 and I’d rather it not die.


Dave it is beautiful....however I am like you a beginner for the Olive Tree and purchased my tree this summer. I too did great outside and conditioned it to the inside. I am in US and in the northern states. You can only water the trees just a little weekly. If you give the tree to much water it will loose leaves. Remember these trees live and and grow in spain etc. The soil is rocky and receives little water. This is why they do so great in California. The other issue I noticed is these tress require 8 or more hours of DIRECT SUNLIGHT.... place in a south sunny window and your tree will thank you... I would only give your tree maybe a 1/2 cup of 8oz. if you want to give water week
William Waud NEW 8 HR BLACK.png
ly. Let me know how she turns out. They are a lot of fun ....
 
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Hey all.

I bought an olive tree from a reputable garden shop and was told I could house it indoors. It is well established and I was advised to water weekly. The tree has been shedding its leaves over the last few weeks. I have had conflicting advice from websites and I’m unsure what to do. It cost me £145.99 and I’d rather it not die.
Hi. Try transplanting the plant yourself. Transplanting at the store with the hands of a saleswoman looks like a convenient and good solution only at first glance and in the short term. Disadvantages:

1. You do not see the roots, and examining them is the first and most important thing you should do after buying (ideally before buying). This is very, very important. Do you really think that if the saleswoman notices rotten roots during the transplanting process that she will honestly tell you, "You shouldn't buy this plant?"

2. In stores they always do not transplant a plant (complete replacement of soil), but transplant (partial replacement). This could have happened to your plant.

What happens when a tree is transplanted (!) in a store:

1. the main clump is a braided root transport soil, most often peat, which has already compressed. The saleswoman has trimmed it a little on the sides, on top, and put it in the pot.

2. On the sides of the pot poured some soil, which, due to the fact that it is new, is not as dense as what is inside, it is lighter, more porous, and permeable.

3. If you do not water, especially after overwatering, the water will run down the sides of the pot, not soaking the main lump. Even if water gets the soil wet from above, it will follow the line of least resistance, down the sides of the pot.

Ideally, depending on the time of year and with or without an adaptation period, the plant should ideally be transplanted with a complete change of soil after purchase, especially if it was bought in the spring.

What to do:

1. Put the pot with the plant in a basin of warm water and let it soak for a few hours. Keep an eye on the temperature of the water, adding lukewarm water from time to time. Make a note of the date of watering.
2. There is no need to do a hot shower.
3. For some time you will have to water in this way, by the method of immersion.
4. Don't forget to let the soil dry out between waterings.
5. You watered once, time passed, the soil dried out, and after the second watering, after you take the olive out of the basin, wet soil pour on top of the ash extract, 50 ml per liter of soil. Record the date of the second and subsequent waterings, the daily air temperature (it only seems that it is always the same). These data may be needed later.

How to prepare the ash extract: a teaspoon (with a handful) of ash (wood ash) pour 1 liter of hot (not necessarily boiling) water, cover, put in a dark place (or wrap a black bag), insist a week, sometimes shaking to stir. There is no need to dilute and strain.

Consider planting olive outdoors for the summer. First, the sun is on its head, not on the side, and second, the soil will normalize there faster, even if you bury it in a pot.

Daily monitor the condition of the olive, if after three weeks the foliage does not stop, you will have to transplant with a complete change of soil. If the outcome is favorable - careful preparation for wintering and transplanting the following spring.

The olive is very hardy, but never forget that you are dealing with a tree - any action you take will have long term consequences.

Good luck!
 

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