How to plant shrubs in the picture


LGY

Joined
Aug 1, 2016
Messages
82
Reaction score
9
Country
United States
hi,
I am new to gardening and wondering how to plant new plants in the ground to achieve these looks in the future when they mature?

They don’t look like curves or zigzag line, but there is a natural repetition pattern. I didn’t look like a plant distance as recommended on the plants as otherwise that will be normal spacing straight line with separation. Any idea?

Thanks in advanced.


4876050D-2D76-4F29-BDDF-60E3F8D4C5A4.jpeg
4876050D-2D76-4F29-BDDF-60E3F8D4C5A4.jpeg8500CC79-101B-4E5B-8C3C-060036D12074.jpeg6DFE1F78-FA98-4275-9FFD-B78B2467B5D5.jpeg
 
Last edited:
Ad

Advertisements

Joined
Jan 30, 2018
Messages
318
Reaction score
254
Location
SE. London/N.Kent. UK
Hardiness Zone
8
Country
United Kingdom
Hello LGY. Firstly apart from preparing the ground and deciding on shape and size. Study the plants/shrubs that you wish to use. Basically I'd say that the plants used in the photo, are ones that once established, won't require too much attention. Obviously to get the best from a bed or border, you want to see as much of each plant as possible, so low plants near the front and gradually plant the taller ones toward the back of the border. The walled back border. You view from the front and along the the length. View of the wall in places will enhance the scene. Actual siting of each plant needs to be considered, so that plants do not become hidden, also consider the flowering period and time. This will keep the border always to be pleasant and interesting to look at.

The othe border, or perhaps it should be called a long bed. Here many of the same principals apply, however you now have a center line to contend with. So, imagine a wall or fence running the length of the bed right along the center. Here you have your tall plants. This allows the bed/border to be viewed from either side, affording the same interest. In large beds, the center line is often planted with what some call,'dot plants' These provide some height. Once again the same applies.

What plants to choose ? This will be governed by your location and hardiness zone. Hope this helps. Enjoy your gardening.
 
Ad

Advertisements

LGY

Joined
Aug 1, 2016
Messages
82
Reaction score
9
Country
United States
Hi Mike,

Thanks for your response.

I am planning to use carpet roses, lavenders (most like Spanish), and blue Tuscan Rosemary; from the fence line to the front area. These options were because of zone 9a / drought / full sun in that area. Nothing will be planted near the back because of reoccurring history of pests and as newbie just want to manage the best front instead of doing too much.

Currently there is a row of rose on the left and red yucca on the right. Those red yucca is nice though I swear one day it will poke some kids eyes out... so the red yucca has to go... the hummingbirds and bees should still be happy with the Spanish lavender around.

All those 3 plants are relatively short and spread wide (eventually when they mature with their spread), so how can I plant them to look like the image in the first post and would not end up like two rows like now?

Hello LGY. Firstly apart from preparing the ground and deciding on shape and size. Study the plants/shrubs that you wish to use. Basically I'd say that the plants used in the photo, are ones that once established, won't require too much attention. Obviously to get the best from a bed or border, you want to see as much of each plant as possible, so low plants near the front and gradually plant the taller ones toward the back of the border. The walled back border. You view from the front and along the the length. View of the wall in places will enhance the scene. Actual siting of each plant needs to be considered, so that plants do not become hidden, also consider the flowering period and time. This will keep the border always to be pleasant and interesting to look at.

The othe border, or perhaps it should be called a long bed. Here many of the same principals apply, however you now have a center line to contend with. So, imagine a wall or fence running the length of the bed right along the center. Here you have your tall plants. This allows the bed/border to be viewed from either side, affording the same interest. In large beds, the center line is often planted with what some call,'dot plants' These provide some height. Once again the same applies.

What plants to choose ? This will be governed by your location and hardiness zone. Hope this helps. Enjoy your gardening.
55298BBD-9DD0-4C81-99EA-CCBB13BB97C0.jpeg
 

Ask a Question

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

You'll need to choose a username for the site, which only take a couple of moments. After that, you can post your question and our members will help you out.

Ask a Question

Top