How do you garden organically?


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I've been speaking to a couple of friends lately about how they garden organically and it dawned on me that everyone seems to have a different preferred method, and although I love mine greatly, I think it's important to share ideas and experiences. We may be able to pick up a thing or two from our fellow gardeners.

Personally, I always garden organically. I make sure to buy seeds that are non-gmo (certified by the company if I'm able to get them from my usual place), I don't spray pesticides or enrich the soil in any way. I usually just plant my non-gmo seeds with their appropriate companions (because even though I don't believe in enriching the soil or spraying anything, this is a natural way to ensure the plants get the nutrients they need and can repel as many bugs as possible) and let nature do it's thing. Aside from watering (and the occasional dose of fertilizer if need be, though usually only once or twice max per plant), I don't tend to add much to my garden.

How do you garden organically? Are you concerned about GMO seeds? Do you use any additives, whether it be sprays, fertilizer, bone meal, etc.? Or are you like me, and enjoying just letting nature be natural? :)
 
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Oh, I wouldn't dream of not amending my soil! I don't add any commercial products though, I just am constantly adding organic compost to it, and any thing that doesn't have seeds and isn't infested goes back into the compost pile. I think this is very natural.

Saves one the garbage bags, too.
 
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We compost all kitchen scraps and yard waste. I have several processes at once - a barrel, pile/hole in the ground and buckets. We have an abundance of red wigglers enjoying the compost and earth worms aerating the soil.

We grow everything organically from traded, shared, and harvested seeds. I am drying pumpkin seeds from our last meal now. My son is excellent at starting plants and shares with me.

We use companion plants to ward off pests, use ground egg shells for slug prevention and next year we will do better at keeping the moths away. They did repeated damage this year.
 
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I've been speaking to a couple of friends lately about how they garden organically and it dawned on me that everyone seems to have a different preferred method, and although I love mine greatly, I think it's important to share ideas and experiences. We may be able to pick up a thing or two from our fellow gardeners.

Personally, I always garden organically. I make sure to buy seeds that are non-gmo (certified by the company if I'm able to get them from my usual place), I don't spray pesticides or enrich the soil in any way. I usually just plant my non-gmo seeds with their appropriate companions (because even though I don't believe in enriching the soil or spraying anything, this is a natural way to ensure the plants get the nutrients they need and can repel as many bugs as possible) and let nature do it's thing. Aside from watering (and the occasional dose of fertilizer if need be, though usually only once or twice max per plant), I don't tend to add much to my garden.

How do you garden organically? Are you concerned about GMO seeds? Do you use any additives, whether it be sprays, fertilizer, bone meal, etc.? Or are you like me, and enjoying just letting nature be natural? :)
Organic gardening is using all of Mother Natures tools to produce the best and the most of her gifts. Adding organic soil amendments and organic fertilizers is making the most of what She gives us. It is insane not to use what is natural in nature to produce our foods. The best soil amendment there is is nothing more than water and decomposed organic mater mixed with a little molasses. And all molasses is is a grain called sorghum cooked down. You don't use soil amendments? How about manure? You can't get much more natural and organic than that. As far as GMO's, in my opinion they should all be burned and the people who produce them shot
 
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I've been speaking to a couple of friends lately about how they garden organically and it dawned on me that everyone seems to have a different preferred method, and although I love mine greatly, I think it's important to share ideas and experiences. We may be able to pick up a thing or two from our fellow gardeners.

Personally, I always garden organically. I make sure to buy seeds that are non-gmo (certified by the company if I'm able to get them from my usual place), I don't spray pesticides or enrich the soil in any way. I usually just plant my non-gmo seeds with their appropriate companions (because even though I don't believe in enriching the soil or spraying anything, this is a natural way to ensure the plants get the nutrients they need and can repel as many bugs as possible) and let nature do it's thing. Aside from watering (and the occasional dose of fertilizer if need be, though usually only once or twice max per plant), I don't tend to add much to my garden.

How do you garden organically? Are you concerned about GMO seeds? Do you use any additives, whether it be sprays, fertilizer, bone meal, etc.? Or are you like me, and enjoying just letting nature be natural? :)
I'm not a real expert when it comes to organic gardening, because I know I still got a lot to learn, but back when I was gardening I tried not to use those nasty fertilizers or toxic poisons to treat pests. I only worked with ornamentals tho, never with edibles, but my dad grows many things organically and he does well. Almost no effort for him.
 
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Using compost and organic fertilizer is good. Friends of mine get manure for their soil. Biggest thing is not spraying any chemicals on your plants. You don't want to be eating that. I think the most important thing is building up the nutrients in the soil ahead of time so that your plants have enough for the season.
 
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I avoid manure and all chemicals. I compost, though I have been purchasing it lately because I just don't produce enough often enough, and I mix it in with the potting soil labeled organic. The only time a spray anything in the garden is something like aspirin for plant health, banana water for plant health/growth, or a mild soap spray for bugs.
 
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Taking care of the soil, IMO, is the first piece of the foundation for a healthy garden. Building up the soil will produce healthy crops, and healthy crops are less likely to suffer pest or disease damage.

There are so many ways you can do it that are organic and safe. True organic gardening does not mean just letting the garden go to survive or not with what was there. Especially when most people do tend to go a little out of the optimal crops for the area. Those crops will need a little help to produce their best.

The real key to organic gardening is to not use things that are harmful to the environment or the people that eat the bounty from the garden.

There are in fact many things out there that might sound like you shouldn't touch them (eg-diatomaceous earth) but are completely natural, normal and safe. (Unless you are slug or Japanese beetle, etc.)

At the same time, there are items out there that sound safe and innocent but are not organic, not safe, and should be avoided. We are blessed these days to have the internet to help us sort out what is safe and what isn't, what a name really means. Don't be afraid to use the things nature gives us to help you get the most out of your garden.
 
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I don't use chemicals in my garden, because I don't want to poison my dog or me. Call me paranoid, but in my opinion all chemicals are dangerous, even those that are available in stores. I prefer to stay away from them.
Compost makes the best fertilizer. As for weed killers, I don't need them, I like weeds:)
 
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Organic gardening is using all of Mother Natures tools to produce the best and the most of her gifts. Adding organic soil amendments and organic fertilizers is making the most of what She gives us. It is insane not to use what is natural in nature to produce our foods. The best soil amendment there is is nothing more than water and decomposed organic mater mixed with a little molasses. And all molasses is is a grain called sorghum cooked down. You don't use soil amendments? How about manure? You can't get much more natural and organic than that. As far as GMO's, in my opinion they should all be burned and the people who produce them shot
I haven't tried using manure yet. I have a slight concern that it'll attract a lot of pests/animals to my garden, as I know some people who have had that issue before. I have been considering it though as I know it gives the plant a little boost. I have never used a single amendment. I think that organic gardening also means allowing the earth to do its thing without me trying to speed up the process or increase my yield. I also want to try composting, but haven't been able to purchase a composting bin yet - I might make one but I need the weather to be warm again before I can even consider that. I also hate GMOs and agree they should all be burned. Can't really agree with people being shot though lol, they're just doing their job :)
 
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Feeding the soil is more efficient and far less harmful than feeding the plant.
Don't cut out the middle-man!!!
I don't necessarily 'feed the plant' either though lol. I rarely fertilize and don't spray anything on them in fear of it seeping into my system. My concern is that it being less harmful, doesn't completely dissolve the fact that it might be harmful. I try to feed the soil with organic compost if possible, but haven't been able to do it in large scale. Companion planting has been my main mode of helping the soil. Do you use anything specific that you might be able to recommend?
 
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I avoid manure and all chemicals. I compost, though I have been purchasing it lately because I just don't produce enough often enough, and I mix it in with the potting soil labeled organic. The only time a spray anything in the garden is something like aspirin for plant health, banana water for plant health/growth, or a mild soap spray for bugs.
Is there a reason you avoid manure? I haven't used it yet because I don't want anything to attract more pests onto my crop. I have heard it's good and 'natural' but I don't know if I believe that entirely as it wouldn't be difficult to add something to the manure. As for the compost, I can see how that's a problem. I produce an overflow of compost because my family eats a lot of fruits and veggies but haven't used it in large scale on my garden as I haven't been able to purchase or build a composting bin. I have never heard of spraying aspirin, banana water or a mild soap spray on plants. I will definitely keep that in mind for next year! Thanks for the tip :)
 
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I don't necessarily 'feed the plant' either though lol. I rarely fertilize and don't spray anything on them in fear of it seeping into my system. My concern is that it being less harmful, doesn't completely dissolve the fact that it might be harmful. I try to feed the soil with organic compost if possible, but haven't been able to do it in large scale. Companion planting has been my main mode of helping the soil. Do you use anything specific that you might be able to recommend?
If there was only ONE thing I would recommend to everyone, it would be actively-aerated compost tea.
It's soil elixir.
 
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If there was only ONE thing I would recommend to everyone, it would be actively-aerated compost tea.
I keep intending to incorporate compost tea. I've read (and seen video) that you can just stir some in a bucket without having to have a pump, etc., though you have to stir repeatedly and again just before use.

Is there a reason you avoid manure? ...I have never heard of spraying aspirin, banana water or a mild soap spray on plants. I will definitely keep that in mind for next year! Thanks for the tip :)
I am just wary of bacteria so I avoid manure. It isn't necessary with all the other organic options available. To make banana water you just put peels in a jar or bottle of water for 2 weeks. You can use this and the aspirin (1 uncoated tablet in a tall spray bottle) year round. Soap spray helps control pests like aphids and spider mites.
 
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Is there a reason you avoid manure? I haven't used it yet because I don't want anything to attract more pests onto my crop. I have heard it's good and 'natural' but I don't know if I believe that entirely as it wouldn't be difficult to add something to the manure. As for the compost, I can see how that's a problem. I produce an overflow of compost because my family eats a lot of fruits and veggies but haven't used it in large scale on my garden as I haven't been able to purchase or build a composting bin. I have never heard of spraying aspirin, banana water or a mild soap spray on plants. I will definitely keep that in mind for next year! Thanks for the tip :)
Manure should be well composted before it is used in the garden, to avoid problems with bacteria. If you use fresh manure you risk e-colli and other things.
 
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Manure should be well composted before it is used in the garden, to avoid problems with bacteria. If you use fresh manure you risk e-colli and other things.
You are exactly right. If manure were going to kill us all we would already be dead
 
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I keep intending to incorporate compost tea. I've read (and seen video) that you can just stir some in a bucket without having to have a pump, etc., though you have to stir repeatedly and again just before use.
Indeed you can, but since it's anaerobic, there is a small possibility that you could do more harm than good, and you will not get the maximum possible benefit, as compost leachate is not the same rich microbial soup.
 
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Manure should be well composted before it is used in the garden, to avoid problems with bacteria. If you use fresh manure you risk e-colli and other things.
It should be, but in this day and age of shortcuts and the quick, fast buck... then again, there's the smell...

You are exactly right. If manure were going to kill us all we would already be dead
It's not listeria.

Indeed you can, but since it's anaerobic, there is a small possibility that you could do more harm than good, and you will not get the maximum possible benefit, as compost leachate is not the same rich microbial soup.
I just remember watching this one guy on You Tube who said he did it manually, and did it that way for decades, and his plants were just fine. A long time ago I read a book or an article that said a good way to do it was to just put compost in a barrel or trash can, fill it with water and place a goldfish in it. I was all set to do that until I learned about people using a pump and why.
 
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It should be, but in this day and age of shortcuts and the quick, fast buck... then again, there's the smell...



It's not listeria.



I just remember watching this one guy on You Tube who said he did it manually, and did it that way for decades, and his plants were just fine. A long time ago I read a book or an article that said a good way to do it was to just put compost in a barrel or trash can, fill it with water and place a goldfish in it. I was all set to do that until I learned about people using a pump and why.
We are not saying to go out and get fresh, steaming, green, right out of the animal manure. Manure based composts are made with already composted manure not freshly splattered cow patties. THERE IS NO SMELL UNLESS YOU DO NOT AERATE IT. Even semi composted tree bark will have an odor if left in a bucket of water with no oxygen. Nothing can live without oxygen and that includes the microbes in manure or that goldfish in a barrel. Even if the bag of manure based compost you purchased at WalMart wasn't completely composted the air in aerated compost tea will allow the microbes to actually consume the harmful bacteria and therefore no smell will occur.
 

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