Hibiscus randomly dying?


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Hi all
The past couple months I purchased two Hibiscus Moscheutos. I already have three lovely Hibiscus Rosa-sinensis that are absolutely thriving after coming back from some pest issues. Lately, one Moschue had declined over a couple days, the leaves wilting all at once as if it hadn’t been water at all. I made sure to keep it watered, not over watered, fertilized it, treated it for pests.. To no avail. It just kept dying back. The stems were fine for a few days, but today the whole plant is just sad. Recently, the other moscheuto has taken the same route after a cold front. I’m thinking the cold fronts and light frosts are to blame, but I live in 8a. Thoughts? Pictures of are both plants today.. The healthier one even started flowering before this.
 

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I have raised many hibiscus and one thing I have found is they don’t tolerate air pockets around their roots. The best way to plant them is to dig the hole and fill it with water. Set the plant in the hole and slowly sprinkle soil into the hole. Add water as needed to keep the hole full. By planting this way the soil oozes into every crevasse in the root system plus you won’t have to water for a couple of days.
 
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I have raised many hibiscus and one thing I have found is they don’t tolerate air pockets around their roots. The best way to plant them is to dig the hole and fill it with water. Set the plant in the hole and slowly sprinkle soil into the hole. Add water as needed to keep the hole full. By planting this way the soil oozes into every crevasse in the root system plus you won’t have to water for a couple of days.
Do you think repotting would save the healthier one? Also, love your profile picture! I have a horse, as well
 
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Rose-mallow Hibiscus or swamp-mallow Hibiscus (Hibiscus moscheutos) is a plant that is difficult to overwater since it often grows in saturated soil. I'm not sure how far gone your dying plants are now, but you might consider setting them up in bog conditions with the pot in a saucer of water that is always kept full. Also do remember that they are a perennial that will die down in Winter.
 
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Rose-mallow Hibiscus or swamp-mallow Hibiscus (Hibiscus moscheutos) is a plant that is difficult to overwater since it often grows in saturated soil. I'm not sure how far gone your dying plants are now, but you might consider setting them up in bog conditions with the pot in a saucer of water that is always kept full. Also do remember that they are a perennial that will die down in Winter.
Would this apply to Rosa-sinensis as well?
 
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China-rose Hibiscus (Hibiscus rosa-sinensis) is an evergreen shrub. It does want regular water but it does not tolerate saturated conditions like H. moscheutos.
In addition, H. rosa-sinensis is frost-tender. It can only be kept outside in in in USDA Zones 9 and higher (lows of 20º F or higher) and even temperatures in the low to mid 20ºs are rather iffy.
 
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Hi all
The past couple months I purchased two Hibiscus Moscheutos. I already have three lovely Hibiscus Rosa-sinensis that are absolutely thriving after coming back from some pest issues. Lately, one Moschue had declined over a couple days, the leaves wilting all at once as if it hadn’t been water at all. I made sure to keep it watered, not over watered, fertilized it, treated it for pests.. To no avail. It just kept dying back. The stems were fine for a few days, but today the whole plant is just sad. Recently, the other moscheuto has taken the same route after a cold front. I’m thinking the cold fronts and light frosts are to blame, but I live in 8a. Thoughts? Pictures of are both plants today.. The healthier one even started flowering before this.

That's textbook cold damage. I've literally seen that happen to my own Hibiscus in Fall. They don't tolerate frost at all.
 
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To be clear:

Hibiscus moscheutos is cold hardy to USDA Zone 5 (-20º F/-28º C). It is a herbaceous perennial that will die down in the Winter.

Hibiscus rosa-sinensis is frost tender, only marginally hardy to USDA Zone 9 (20º F/-6º C). It is an evergreen shrub that should keep its leaves year-round.
 
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We have several "dinner plate" hibiscus plants. The deep red one is about 5 years old and grows to about 6ft high x ft wide now. it blooms from June through October until the frost. The blooms get up to 10 inches across and there are on average about 50 all the time, even though they only last one day. So it produces thousands of blooms each year.

The do die back quickly when the cold weather or frost hits and we cut them down to a few inches above the ground. The important thing is to have patience, because they are the last thing to come back each year. You wait and wait think they have died and then you are about to dig them up and suddenly they shoot and they very grow fast. Ours have survived occasional negative (F) temperatures.
 

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