Help (Monstera Albo) - Fungus? Bacterial? Root rot? What is wrong?


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I got this little cupcake about 2 weeks ago and since yesterday I noticed some new spots that are developing, and now my heart is sinking that it might be bacterial leaf spot or root rot and its a new adventure every day lol. She is a monstera albo borsigiana. The spots are on the lowest two leaves, I have watered her exactly two times, once when I got her and put her in new ground and the second time was on Thursday (so about 10 days in between) as the top 3-4 cm were dry. She is in a mix for green plants, perlite, orchid bark and a tiny bit of seramis. She is also in a plant bag as I thought that might provide her with better air flow, humidity is about 50-60%.

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What is wrong? What are those spots? Bacterial? Fungus? Root rot? Thank you in advance for your time!
 
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No not Bacterial, or Fungus or Root rot! Those are water spots that come from excess water in the plant some time in the recent past. A plant pushes water through to the edge of its leaves, and if given in excess, this can cause veins at the edges to burst, which leads to browning. The damage could have been done two weeks or a month ago and now showing signs. So the core issue is to maintain a good water management program that will allow the water to exit the plant and soil. Let the top inch or two to dry well before watering again.
 
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No not Bacterial, or Fungus or Root rot! Those are water spots that come from excess water in the plant some time in the recent past. A plant pushes water through to the edge of its leaves, and if given in excess, this can cause veins at the edges to burst, which leads to browning. The damage could have been done two weeks or a month ago and now showing signs. So the core issue is to maintain a good water management program that will allow the water to exit the plant and soil. Let the top inch or two to dry well before watering again.

Thank you so much for your reply! It feels as if a stone fell from my heart. However, the spots on one of the leaves seem to be joining together and growing slightly, and there is like a little yellow halo mostly around one of the brown spots. On the second image above, the left smaller brown spot is what I meant by a halo. Would this be normal if it was caused by excess water? I am sorry for the dumb question but Ive never seen fungus or bacterial leaf spot in my life so I am really confused... how do I know it is NOT either fungal or bacterial? Images on google arent being very helpful to me. Thank you again for your time!!
 
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Fungi are multicellular, eukaryotic organisms, while bacteria are single-celled prokaryotes. The cells of fungi have nuclei that contain the chromosomes and other organelles, such as mitochondria and ribosomes. Bacteria are much smaller than fungi, do not have nuclei or other organelles and cannot reproduce sexually. In other words the fungus reproduce from spores and when conditions are favorable the fungus thrives.

While bacteria are alive and are a single cell and thrives from certain kind of environmental conditions. Bacteria reproduce by binary fission. Binary fission begins when the DNA of the bacterium divides into two (replicates). The bacterial cell then elongates and splits into two daughter cells each with identical DNA to the parent cell. They enter plants through tiny openings either through damage, or cuts, but also through natural opens in the plant itself. Once plants are affected, they can be difficult to control.
 
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Fungi are multicellular, eukaryotic organisms, while bacteria are single-celled prokaryotes. The cells of fungi have nuclei that contain the chromosomes and other organelles, such as mitochondria and ribosomes. Bacteria are much smaller than fungi, do not have nuclei or other organelles and cannot reproduce sexually. In other words the fungus reproduce from spores and when conditions are favorable the fungus thrives.

While bacteria are alive and are a single cell and thrives from certain kind of environmental conditions. Bacteria reproduce by binary fission. Binary fission begins when the DNA of the bacterium divides into two (replicates). The bacterial cell then elongates and splits into two daughter cells each with identical DNA to the parent cell. They enter plants through tiny openings either through damage, or cuts, but also through natural opens in the plant itself. Once plants are affected, they can be difficult to control.

Woah, thank you for the science lesson! :) It is much appreciated but I was asking more in the direction of: how do I visually differentiate that a spot is not caused by bacterial infection or fungus? I am concerned as the spots above on the plant are slightly continuing to grow :( Thank you again for your time!
 
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Fungi are multicellular, eukaryotic organisms, while bacteria are single-celled prokaryotes. The cells of fungi have nuclei that contain the chromosomes and other organelles, such as mitochondria and ribosomes. Bacteria are much smaller than fungi, do not have nuclei or other organelles and cannot reproduce sexually. In other words the fungus reproduce from spores and when conditions are favorable the fungus thrives.

While bacteria are alive and are a single cell and thrives from certain kind of environmental conditions. Bacteria reproduce by binary fission. Binary fission begins when the DNA of the bacterium divides into two (replicates). The bacterial cell then elongates and splits into two daughter cells each with identical DNA to the parent cell. They enter plants through tiny openings either through damage, or cuts, but also through natural opens in the plant itself. Once plants are affected, they can be difficult to control.

THe spots are now growing steadily and there is a yellowing of the leaf area where they are, plus, there is a brown spot on the stem where the lowest leaf is attached :( what do i do...
 

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Just let the soil dry out well and it should slow the browning. Your plant is showing signs of over watering and locking out oxygen in the roots with excess water. Browning edges or spots can mean too much water. A plant pushes water through to the edge of its leaves, and if given in excess, this can cause veins at the edges to burst, which leads to browning. I don't think it's a bacterial infection or fungus at this point, however, lack of oxygen in the roots, will always lead to either.
 
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Could I ask what people think this is the photos are just over a week apart. I thought it was over watering and I reported into a more free draining soil. There was no root rot. The soils really quite dry now. I have also used a dilute mix of neem oil on the leaves.

All the other 4 leaves are really healthy, should I cut it off?

Any help is really appreciated
 

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:) Hello @Karenhp1 ...Welcome to the forum. It might have been better if you had started a new thread. Apart from the little bit of damage to the leaf, your plant seems quite healthy. If you have just repotted it, it would be best to give it a good thorough watering now, and then leave it for about two weeks before watering again. It needs water to get it going again. If it were mine, I would just cut off the leaf with the damage - it will grow more.
 

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