Heirloom tomatoes reseeding. Chance for new variety?


Joined
May 4, 2015
Messages
2,441
Reaction score
1,459
Location
Mid Michigan
Hardiness Zone
5b
Country
United States
I have numerous tomato seedlings sprouting in my vegetable beds. I was going to just pull them up when it occurred to me I might have some new variety of tomatoes. Last year a planted 8 types, mostly heirloom. It's possible that cross pollination could lead to some of these being hybrids, right?

I still have room so when a few look vigorous I will move them to their own space.
 
Ad

Advertisements

Joined
Feb 2, 2014
Messages
10,647
Reaction score
4,987
Location
Tarpley Tx
Hardiness Zone
8b
Country
United States
Of course it is possible but how would you know for sure if it happened or not?
 
Joined
Oct 10, 2012
Messages
9,001
Reaction score
10,556
Location
Kent
Hardiness Zone
9a
Country
United Kingdom
It's not often Tomatoes cross polinate without physical help, they have a perfect flower, with both the stamen and the stigma in the same blossom, so polination often occurs before the flower is even open.

Not saying it can't happen, but it's unlikely :)
 
Joined
Oct 10, 2012
Messages
9,001
Reaction score
10,556
Location
Kent
Hardiness Zone
9a
Country
United Kingdom
Cross polinated posted there Bees :D
 
Joined
Sep 10, 2014
Messages
2,794
Reaction score
3,978
Location
central Texas
Showcase(s):
1
Country
United States
We have had heirloom/non-hybrid tomatoes self-seed. We have found that after two or three years the tomatoes are smaller, fewer, and the vines are less vigorous. We have experienced this with Red and Yellow Pear, which are small cherry type tomatoes, although not round but pear shaped.
We have also had Celebrities self-seed, and they seem to lose vigor after the second year.
If the self-seeded tomatoes are in a spot where I can leave them, I do and see what happens. I do prefer to either save seed on purpose, or order new seed for the growing year.
 
Ad

Advertisements

Joined
May 4, 2015
Messages
2,441
Reaction score
1,459
Location
Mid Michigan
Hardiness Zone
5b
Country
United States
Ah, thank you all. I was reading some conflicting stuff online so figured I'd ask here. I will just pull the babies up then. That's what I usually do anyway; I don't plant tomatoes in the same place every year. Right now the babies are sprouting around greens and potatoes and green beans. :)

Oh @Chuck good point I suppose I wouldn't necessarily know, would I! Unless maybe I saw a very different tomato that I didn't recognize.
 

Ask a Question

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

You'll need to choose a username for the site, which only take a couple of moments. After that, you can post your question and our members will help you out.

Ask a Question

Top