Garden Berries

Discussion in 'Fruits' started by Tjohn, Dec 5, 2017.

  1. Tjohn

    Tjohn

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    Last year we tried Aunt Molly's Ground Cherries from Baker Creek and were delighted with the results. This year I would like to try Huckleberries from them, but can't find much information on them. Has anyone grown them?
     
    Tjohn, Dec 5, 2017
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  2. Tjohn

    Chuck

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    If you were successful in growing Ground Cherries then you cannot grow Huckleberries. The reason is that Huckleberries must have very acidic soils, like blue berries, and ground cherries and tomatillas need very slight acidic to moderate alkaline soils. I have grown tomatillas and ground cherries many times over the years and have tried to grow blueberries but my soil is way to alkaline. I even dug a 2 foot deep, 2 foot square hole once and filled it with peat moss but within 2 seasons it was dead. Never got the first blue berry. I even tried to grow them in large containers filled with peat with only less than moderate success. They just do not grow where the soil is even slightly alkaline and this applies to both huckleberries and blue berries.
     
    Last edited: Dec 5, 2017
    Chuck, Dec 5, 2017
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    MoonShadows

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    Just checked them out on Baker Creek. I might order some.
     
    MoonShadows, Dec 5, 2017
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  4. Tjohn

    Tjohn

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    Thank-you, Chuck. I grew the ground cherries in bags on tables last year. We already grow blueberries with no problem, so I can probably grow Huckleberies, too. I'm hoping they taste good ! So many of those "rare" seeds produce fruit that doesn't have much flavor (which is probably why people don't grow them any more).
     
    Tjohn, Dec 5, 2017
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  5. Tjohn

    Chuck

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    No problem then. I wished I could grow them. All of the big box stores here sell them to unknowledgable folks and then they call all of the garden shows on the radio asking why their plants died. Maybe some of them who read this thread won't waste their money.
     
    Chuck, Dec 5, 2017
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    Silentrunning

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    @Chuck Would a good mulching of pine needles help or would this be adding too little acid?
     
    Silentrunning, Dec 5, 2017
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  7. Tjohn

    Chuck

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    If you have pine trees in your area then your soil is already acidic and adding needles wouldn't add enough acid to your soil to even measure. Huckleberries and blueberries need a Ph of about 4-5.
     
    Chuck, Dec 5, 2017
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