Fungus problem?


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There are two bushes on the side of my house that have dusty leaves. There's another plant in between that doesn't seem to be affected. However, I transplanted some raspberries this year, and one of the raspberries is near by and looks like it has been infected.

It looks to me like some kind of fungus. I've not had any problems with these bushes in previous years (we've been in the house 6 years). It is on a side of the house that has shade in the morning, but gets full sun most of the afternoon (basically the west side of the house).

I thought about treating this with a anti-fungal spray I have. The active ingredient is Propiconazole. It is labeled for lawn use, and has a notice about not spraying food plants. I've collected a few berries, but I wasn't really expecting to get any raspberries the first year and I could just not harvest anything, if need be.

I'm going to do some other research, but would be interested in anyone's thoughts. Am I correct that this is fungal? Would Propiconazole be an appropriate treatment? If so, should I not harvest any berries for the rest of the season?
 

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It doesn't look like any of the fungicides labeled "garden safe" have Propiconazole in them, so I'll just skip that, but I could pick something else up, if anyone has recommendations (assuming fungicide is the right course). I'd also be fine just leaving it be as long as it won't kill the raspberries or recur next year.
 
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The nastiest killers...and I mean most penetrating, which is related to getting down to the roots...are antagonistic fungi and bacteria that are fungi-like. Trichoderma and the streptomycin products are commercially available. The weakness of a chemical is that it is a dead thing. It has no hunger, and like any other poison has to lay in wait for a live thing to touch it. Or on top you spray the live thing with the poison. Underground though, it is not as mobile as a live thing. Just a thought.

What is hard to decide..or perhaps the idea is more to control, is how do you use a live defense in conjunction with a chemistry capable of killing any biological defense applied? Now you are growing things!
 
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There is always Neem Oil which is a fungicide. Then there is hydrogen peroxide. Or you could try diluted milk. Also, you could use cornmeal and/or cornmeal tea. Baking soda is an old time home remedy fungicide best when used with Dawn or Ivory dishwashing liquid. I would try any and all of these before I'd use some chemical concoction. The main thing to do is water properly thus preventing the disease in the first place. Do this and mix in a little of any of the above and your powdery mildew problem will disappear. Of course, incessant rains are another matter entirely.
 
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zigs

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Spider mite damage or chlorosis :eek:
 

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