Fungi near monstera, bad or not so bad?


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Hi,

I have recently propagated a cutting from my indoor monstera deliciosa and have been acclimatising it to outside to be one day planted in the ground.

It's in a plastic pot which I don't normally like, but due to its temporary nature I saved on using a terracotta. I find plastic retains too much moisture, potentially leading me to why I am writing this.

This morning I have had the fruiting bodies of two fungi pop throughout the soil (pictured). I'm not sure if this is an ok or a bad thing? Are they part of an important network of mycorrhizae, or shall I just pull them up?

Any help would be greatly appreciated!

I'm in east Los Angeles, experienced one day of heavy rain recently.
 

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Hi,

I have recently propagated a cutting from my indoor monstera deliciosa and have been acclimatising it to outside to be one day planted in the ground.

It's in a plastic pot which I don't normally like, but due to its temporary nature I saved on using a terracotta. I find plastic retains too much moisture, potentially leading me to why I am writing this.

This morning I have had the fruiting bodies of two fungi pop throughout the soil (pictured). I'm not sure if this is an ok or a bad thing? Are they part of an important network of mycorrhizae, or shall I just pull them up?

Any help would be greatly appreciated!

I'm in east Los Angeles, experienced one day of heavy rain recently.
Don't worry about them. They are a good fungi and are just decomposing organic matter in the soil. AFAIK they have nothing to do with mycorrihizae.
 
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Amazing, good to know.

Thanks Chuck!
Those "toad stools" are the fruiting body of the fungi. They will die very soon and turn into a very fine brown powder. This powder is made up of jillions of fungal spores and are spread by the wind to the next place that has available organic matter for them to feed upon. If it weren't for them we would all be miles deep in dead vegetation.
 

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