Full shade tall evergreen zone 8?


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I am trying to sort plants for the front of the house. We lost some trees and shrubbery in the process. It is a very shaded area, but it is also on a hill, acidic chirty clay, and in zone 8 which is -10f to 100f in the shade. I see evergreens stopping at zone 7 because of the heat. I find low shrubbery but not too many taller plants or trees. Ideas? Cedars work but are soooo slooow. The first pic shadows are from the morning sun 10 am-ish, the third pic shadow is later about 2pm.
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Ilex opaca (American Holly)?
Its the thorns and slow growth with that one. Holly does well though, we have 5 or six types out there, mostly low growers. A few tall ones will fit in, And I have some sky pencils out there too for different shapes.
 
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Conifers are always good to grow with space around them. Perhaps Eucalyptus would work.
Now that hit me out of the blue. Never considered Euca though pines do well here and there are many heights. Any particular ones? I imagine there are a variety. I learned from @Tetters about a dwarf pine, a lumpy cute little plant that I tucked into my "wanna plant it" file.
 
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These are British sites @DirtMechanic but they will give you ideas. In my previous post I was referring to the softer foliaged conifers. Prices differ greatly from nursery to nursery so I've chosen these sites more from a browsing point of view.


 
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Thank you! The euca sounds exactly like growing a fig here, at least the 2 more cold hardy ones I was reading about. Some of the climate comparisions specifically mention UK, a Austrialia has no place from which to catch an arctic wind. Here though, it would need southern sun and a northern backstop, like a fig. They need a lot of light though, and the canopy that appears over us across summer is virtually full shade. I have been trimming back and opening up and generally fighting back the encroachment of shade but it is a tough environ for a sun loving plant in front of my house.
 
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I inherited a Eucalyptus at a previous garden. The garden was tiny, roughly 30 x 30ft and to one side there was this 40ft tree, Not the ideal place to plant one and the leaves kept us awake on windy nights rustling as they're quite leathery.

You and I have the same hardiness zone but I haven't seen any here, the tree I've mentioned was in southern England the zone there being around 9a.

If you're opening up the area then there's a possibility it might cope with the situation particularly if you're able to plant on the edge of it. There's no reason why Conifers shouldn't cope with the situation, another idea.... have you considered Birches?
 
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Our birches do well in full sun. They may grow on the perimeter. They have reaching branches to find those necessary spots of light. Here is a photo of the light source lean at roughly 90 degrees.
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This will be the afternoon sun hole. Its probably enough, but certainly an evergreen will have less competion in our winter. What about monkey puzzle?
 

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Well in a kardashian instagram world looks seem to increase property values. Plus I raise blackberries so the gloves have been sorted. I admit I have to collapse any restrictions becausethere are so few choices. It is so shady that right there off the steps we grow a (small form) voodoo lily that stinks like a dead squirrel. They do not do any sun.
 
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Yew keeps popping up. Evergreen but I want to say needs sun or something, now I will go look at it again. Hawthorne is of the rose family, needs sun. Acers work well here, several down there already. Mountain ash is also a form of rose so sunlight needs will preclude them.
 
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I thought of a couple which are possibility ? Mahonia / Elaeagnus not sure if they are hardy enough though.
The viburnum family a good one to look into Viburnum Burkwood should be ok . Cornus mas would brighten it up during winter or other members of the cornus family. Buxus would be ok.

I were going to say fatsia but you've already got one which is grouped in Hardiness 5 in the UK same as mahonia / elaeagnus. Might be a trail and error with various plants. A few more to pick from if you try plants which are not quite as hardy on paper but harder than you think like Camellia - sarcococca
 
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I found a leather leaf mahonia the other day that is at least as tall as I am. Elaeagnus works too. We have some out in the woods that are 6-8 ft tall at least. Side story, we found a 3 legged dog dying under that one, and nursed it back to health. We called her Elae (e-lee). I will spend some time on your other suggestions thank you!
 
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