Frost protection

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I have several strong herbs that I'd like to try to winter ( rosemary, thyme and oregano, plus a verity of lavenders) I have moved them from pots which I grow them in during the summer months to raised beds and heaped the soil around the base. I also have tree hibiscus plants that I's like to try to keep, they were stunning this year. I live in Indiana, so the winters can be quite brutal, I don't have anywhere to bring the plants in and wondered how effective frost blankets are?
 
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When we lived in upstate NY with brutal winters, all of the herbs you mentioned overwintered in the ground in the herb bed. The bed was backed by the house foundation (bricks) and in an area out of the prevailing wind. I think that in Indiana you could just make sure the herbs are protected from wind, and if they don't have a heat-retaining backing, stack some bricks in back of them to collect and retain warmth.
I have no idea about your hibiscus, but I'm sure you'll get some good advice about overwintering them from other gardeners here.
 
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alp

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If the raised bed is south/west facing and as @marlingardener points out, sheltered, they should be OK. You can mulch around the base and don't trim anything upper branches as they will help insulate the root. Also, make sure the soil is not soggy - free-draining and sandy. I would take hibiscus cuttings. They root in no time. It's like having an heir and a spare or several spares. In the future, it might be a good idea to position herbs next to bricks and/or concrete which retain daytime heat and slowly release it back during night time. Or position them where it is sunniest and warmest, next to some bricks/concrete and sheltered with free-draining soil. If the rosemary is a draping one which is far superior in every way than the upright one which looks straggly and horrible as it gets old, you can layer several branches and weigh them down with stones or even bricks. It works a treat!
 
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When we lived in upstate NY with brutal winters, all of the herbs you mentioned overwintered in the ground in the herb bed. The bed was backed by the house foundation (bricks) and in an area out of the prevailing wind. I think that in Indiana you could just make sure the herbs are protected from wind, and if they don't have a heat-retaining backing, stack some bricks in back of them to collect and retain warmth.
I have no idea about your hibiscus, but I'm sure you'll get some good advice about overwintering them from other gardeners here.
Thank you Marlingardener! My raised beds back onto the house and face east away from the prevailing wind! Hopefully they will survive!
If the raised bed is south/west facing and as @marlingardener points out, sheltered, they should be OK. You can mulch around the base and don't trim anything upper branches as they will help insulate the root. Also, make sure the soil is not soggy - free-draining and sandy. I would take hibiscus cuttings. They root in no time. It's like having an heir and a spare or several spares. In the future, it might be a good idea to position herbs next to bricks and/or concrete which retain daytime heat and slowly release it back during night time. Or position them where it is sunniest and warmest, next to some bricks/concrete and sheltered with free-draining soil. If the rosemary is a draping one which is far superior in every way than the upright one which looks straggly and horrible as it gets old, you can layer several branches and weigh them down with stones or even bricks. It works a treat!
thank you
If the raised bed is south/west facing and as @marlingardener points out, sheltered, they should be OK. You can mulch around the base and don't trim anything upper branches as they will help insulate the root. Also, make sure the soil is not soggy - free-draining and sandy. I would take hibiscus cuttings. They root in no time. It's like having an heir and a spare or several spares. In the future, it might be a good idea to position herbs next to bricks and/or concrete which retain daytime heat and slowly release it back during night time. Or position them where it is sunniest and warmest, next to some bricks/concrete and sheltered with free-draining soil. If the rosemary is a draping one which is far superior in every way than the upright one which looks straggly and horrible as it gets old, you can layer several branches and weigh them down with stones or even bricks. It works a treat!
thank you Alp, my raised beds get plenty of daytime sunshine, but I will mulch around them for added protection. I’ve not seen a draping rosemary, I’ll check it out, sounds pretty! Can you tell me how to take cuttings from the hibiscus please, I’ve never thought of doing that!
 

alp

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Click on this thread and see which video(s) you want to get some inspiration from please. Use half sand and half compost for growing medium. You can also try water as suggested. Fun! Have a go with both methods and upload your progress. You can do the same with rosemary (I mean half sand and half compost). Have fun and good luck!
 
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Click on this thread and see which video(s) you want to get some inspiration from please. Use half sand and half compost for growing medium. You can also try water as suggested. Fun! Have a go with both methods and upload your progress. You can do the same with rosemary (I mean half sand and half compost). Have fun and good luck!
Thank you Alp! I shall give it a try!
 
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