Few bell peppers


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Last yr I got loads of peppers . I rotated but only about 20 ft and have the same size plants but only 2 peppers for 6 plants. What is the soil lacking in that location? I also planted a fish remains under each plant. Would topping have helped?
 
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I am no expert in peppers, but it strikes me that soil is not the only possible variable. Weather, available light, the presence of pollinating insects, for example, can all vary
 
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Last yr I got loads of peppers . I rotated but only about 20 ft and have the same size plants but only 2 peppers for 6 plants. What is the soil lacking in that location? I also planted a fish remains under each plant. Would topping have helped?
If your plants produced a lot of blooms but did not set fruit it is not a cause of fertilization. A pepper plant is self pollinating so it does not need insects to pollinate the blooms. The main cause for a pepper plant to not set fruit is temperature. If the daytime temperatures are above 93F and the nighttime low temperatures are above 75F bell pepper blooms will drop and/or become non-viable. Hot peppers can produce in slightly hotter temperatures than can bell peppers. Bell peppers are the least heat tolerant of all peppers.

If your plant did not produce blooms it is caused by a lack of phosphorus
 
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I have seen a lot of threads with this question. It got hot early and stayed hot, impacting many gardens in different countries the owners then seeking advice on forums like this one.

We had at least one atmospheric event capable of producing such a sharp change. The Tonga volcano under the Pacific Ocean flash boiled enough water to increase moisture in the mesosphere by roughly 10%. Mesosphere layers which in turn lay above the stratosphere are surprisingly high altitude. This is supposed to insulate and warm the land for at least 2-3 years from the speculations I have read on the various Space Weather, climate and NASA sites I have come across. Water absorbs infrared energy and it cannot leave and thus cool like normal. I get the impression the Tonga steam ejection discovery is so recent that deeper understanding of what that much steam has done to our normal atmospheric heat loss mechanism has not been fully understood yet. My reaction is to recalibrate and add to my USDA zone and Heat zone rating by at least 1. I will plant later in fall and earlier in Spring by 1 month, roughly.
 
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