Favourite Veg


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What veggies have you grown that you insist on growing every year? Would like to hear what veggies people like growing the most!
 
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Chard. Caterpillars and pigeons don't touch it, in fact it never has any pests, it goes on producing all year round, and I actually like eating it.
And everyone likes and grows tomatoes, Yum Yum, but they are a fruit, not a vegetable. (ducks).
 
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What veggies have you grown that you insist on growing every year? Would like to hear what veggies people like growing the most!
Potatoes
Leeks
Onions
Garlic
Beetroot
Carrots
Courgette
Tomato
Chili peppers
Cucumber
Runner/French Beans

I love cabbage (for bubble and squeak), broccili and cauliflower too, but have less success with these.
 

Meadowlark

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I grow well over 90% of the veggies we consume....and have done so for several decades....and there are many types I insist on.

I insist on: potatoes (at least 200 pounds per year harvested), onions (at least 200 pounds per year), corn (at least 300 ears per year), beans (various types including pole beans (30 quarts canned per year), pinto beans (30 pounds frozen per year, Bingo beans (20 pounds frozen per year), navy beans (about 15 pounds frozen per year), peas including 30 pounds of shelled peas frozen per year and a row of sugar snaps companion planted with potatoes, various brassicas including broccoli, cabbage, kale, brussels sprouts, are planted for continuous fresh consumption all fall and winter, various types of lettuce, carrots, beets, chard, collards, various types of peppers including jalapeno, bells and others, about 300 pounds of tomatoes canned each year, cucumbers, various melons, and probably several more types I failed to list.

But....the most important plants I grow are not the above veggies but are the cover crops which enable all the above production without the use of any synthetic fertilizers, weed killers, fungicides, non-organic insecticides, and plastics. These cover crops include alfalfa, field peas, Austrian peas, soybeans, clovers, vetch, turnips (also for eating), radish (also for eating), elbon rye, sunflowers as insect traps, and Sunn Hemp.

I strive for and generally achieve soil test results which say, " No N-P-K recommended".

I honestly can't name one veggie I like growing the best. I enjoy growing them all.
 
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I grow well over 90% of the veggies we consume....and have done so for several decades....and there are many types I insist on.

I insist on: potatoes (at least 200 pounds per year harvested), onions (at least 200 pounds per year), corn (at least 300 ears per year), beans (various types including pole beans (30 quarts canned per year), pinto beans (30 pounds frozen per year, Bingo beans (20 pounds frozen per year), navy beans (about 15 pounds frozen per year), peas including 30 pounds of shelled peas frozen per year and a row of sugar snaps companion planted with potatoes, various brassicas including broccoli, cabbage, kale, brussels sprouts, are planted for continuous fresh consumption all fall and winter, various types of lettuce, carrots, beets, chard, collards, various types of peppers including jalapeno, bells and others, about 300 pounds of tomatoes canned each year, cucumbers, various melons, and probably several more types I failed to list.

But....the most important plants I grow are not the above veggies but are the cover crops which enable all the above production without the use of any synthetic fertilizers, weed killers, fungicides, non-organic insecticides, and plastics. These cover crops include alfalfa, field peas, Austrian peas, soybeans, clovers, vetch, turnips (also for eating), radish (also for eating), elbon rye, sunflowers as insect traps, and Sunn Hemp.

I strive for and generally achieve soil test results which say, " No N-P-K recommended".

I honestly can't name one veggie I like growing the best. I enjoy growing them all.
I've sown some field beans in some of my beds - I'm hoping to harvest them so I have plenty of seed to use the following year.

I didn't know radish and turnips were good cover crops. I'm not keen on either but I am very good at growing them!

Our garden is jam packed full of umpteen varieties of sunflowers - because I like them. So good to know they're helping the soil. I have noticed they're all full of earwigs? Clover (white and red) gets everywhere whether I want it to or not.

Alphalpha is an interesting one to me. That's been sprouts, right? So could you plant them as a cover crop but also harvest them for sprouting seeds all year around?
 

Meadowlark

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...Alphalpha is an interesting one to me. That's been sprouts, right? So could you plant them as a cover crop but also harvest them for sprouting seeds all year around?
I purchase alfalfa seed from a supplier and plant it as a cover crop, but it is never in the ground longer than 6 to 9 months before it is turned under for soil replenishment. It is a marvelous plant with many beneficial uses.

...I didn't know radish and turnips were good cover crops. I'm not keen on either but I am very good at growing them!

Both are excellent at weed suppression and are widely used here as cover crops in winter.
 
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Chard. Caterpillars and pigeons don't touch it, in fact it never has any pests, it goes on producing all year round, and I actually like eating it.
And everyone likes and grows tomatoes, Yum Yum, but they are a fruit, not a vegetable. (ducks).
Not surprised nothing touches it; not a fan.
 
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I love growing potatoes most of all.
It's not for the kudos, anyone can grow them.
Farmers usually spray potatoes 12 times from planting to harvest, & most of these sprayings are far more than a single chemical.
I use seaweed, comfrey & woodash & have, over the years, found some beautiful varieties.
On this forum, I've not heard of many varieties grown by amateurs in N America.
Is that correct, or is it just that those mentioned are favourites?
Here in the UK we have over a hundred varieties to choose from.
I also have 2 12'x6' beds dedicated yo onions & garlic.
At the moment I am picking sweetcorn, courgettes, the last of the runner beans, leeks, beetroot, swede, red cabbage, parsnips, with sprouts & more carrots to follow.
Earlier in the year I grew spring greens, broad beans (fava) & peas.
In the greenhouse I'm still taking tomatoes red/yellow/green peppers chillies cucumbers & aubergines. Horticulturally they are fruit, but I believe that they are legally classed as veg in USA due to the differentials in taxation between fruit & veg in the past.
 
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