Dwarf fruit trees for landscape in zone 8a


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What smaller trees or bushes could you recommend for a landscape for zone 8a? We are on the coast, so very sandy soil. I'm planting 4 blueberry bushes in front of the kitchen window. We have woods touch the back and one side of our small back yard. Planting raspberries along one side (and sort of let them ramble into the woods), and blackberries on the other side. Have 3 fig trees about to go in the ground. Would LOVE to plant a couple of cherry bushes or very small tree against the house foundation on one side. Would also love to consider persimmon and pomegranate trees. Do those grow in our climate? Any recommendations?

thanks!
 
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Meadowlark

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Yes persimmon and pomegranate both do well in zone 8. Easy to grow and manage. Looking at your list, I don't see grapes which do very well in our zone, especially muscadine varieties. Also, plums do excellent. I have each of these plus more.

I had raspberries at one time but they just were too invasive for me. Blackberries are a staple. I'm in the third year of a mulberry tree a nice small tree but no fruit yet.
 
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Yes persimmon and pomegranate both do well in zone 8. Easy to grow and manage. Looking at your list, I don't see grapes which do very well in our zone, especially muscadine varieties. Also, plums do excellent. I have each of these plus more.

I had raspberries at one time but they just were too invasive for me. Blackberries are a staple. I'm in the third year of a mulberry tree a nice small tree but no fruit yet.
Excellent input! Thank you!! Are there any varieties of any of the fruit trees that are dwarf enough to put in a house landscape?
 
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Persimmon likes a Ph of 6.5-7.5 but living in Wilmington your soil is salty. Persimmon does not like salinity at all. Pomegranates like the same Ph as persimmon. Their salt tolerance depends on the variety so check with local nurseries as to which variety. You must know the Ph of your soil. Berries, especially blue berries like acidic soil, around the 5.5 range. If blue berries are prevelent in your area then it will probably be too acidic for pomegranates but again, check with a local nursery.
 
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I had the soil tested last year and I believe it was around 4.5.
You may be able to successfully grow pomegranates if you get the correct variety but I am afraid the soil is too acidic for persimmon. Great for berries.
 
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Meadowlark

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Excellent input! Thank you!! Are there any varieties of any of the fruit trees that are dwarf enough to put in a house landscape?

Yes, Plums and Persimmons are offered in dwarf varieties by Stark Bros. Not sure about Pomegranates. I keep my plums pruned back so I can easily harvest them and they tolerate the pruning well. Same for Pomegranates. American persimmons grow wild here in East Texas and are prized by wildlife for their fruit. All are easy to grow here but require pruning to keep them manageable.
 
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You may be able to successfully grow pomegranates if you get the correct variety but I am afraid the soil is too acidic for persimmon. Great for berries.
Apologies! I was wrong on our ph. it's 5.3. . Attaching the report to see if any other info might be useful to consider :) would you recommendations now change?
 

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Yes persimmon and pomegranate both do well in zone 8. Easy to grow and manage. Looking at your list, I don't see grapes which do very well in our zone, especially muscadine varieties. Also, plums do excellent. I have each of these plus more.

I had raspberries at one time but they just were too invasive for me. Blackberries are a staple. I'm in the third year of a mulberry tree a nice small tree but no fruit yet.
I posted the soil report above from last year. would you have additional input based on the ph of 5.3?
 
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Apologies! I was wrong on our ph. it's 5.3. . Attaching the report to see if any other info might be useful to consider :) would you recommendations now change?
Still to acidic. Look at the following link. Of the trees that I know that are on the list, it seems to be accurate. Use it as a guideline, not the gospel.
 
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Still to acidic. Look at the following link. Of the trees that I know that are on the list, it seems to be accurate. Use it as a guideline, not the gospel.
oh man! Could I amend individual sites to raise the pH? and if so, what would you suggest I use?
 
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oh man! Could I amend individual sites to raise the pH? and if so, what would you suggest I use?
The answer to your question is yes and no. You can raise the Ph by adding lime. You can see the effects in a few months time but it isn't permanent. It will last 2-3 years and then you have to do it again. The amount of lime you will need is between 4 and 6 tablespoons per square foot of soil. When I lived where the soil was acidic I tried this with limited success. What you do first is till up and apply about 1/2 of the lime needed. Till as deep as you can. Then add the remaining lime and till it in again to assure all of the soil has been treated. This works, but fooling mother nature is always a losing proposition in the long run
 
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Meadowlark

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At 5.3 and in 8a, I think I would give the "Anna" apple tree a try. You can prune it to fit and just throw out some ag. lime every few months to help keep the ph up a little. They make a nice tasting apple for the southern regions.
 

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