Downy mildew ?....Am I wrong ?


Joined
Feb 2, 2014
Messages
6,655
Reaction score
3,332
Location
Tarpley Tx
Hardiness Zone
8b
Country
us
I think what you have is powdery mildew although both powdery mildew and downy mildew are similar. Mix 2 tablespoons baking soda, one tablespoon of Neem and 1 teaspoon of dishsoap in a gallon of water and spray twice weekly until symptoms disappear. Try to keep moisture away from the leaves if you can but with all the rain a cure is dubious at best.
 
Ad

Advertisements

Joined
Mar 11, 2018
Messages
347
Reaction score
544
Location
Dothan, AL
Hardiness Zone
8b
Country
us
I think what you have is powdery mildew although both powdery mildew and downy mildew are similar. Mix 2 tablespoons baking soda, one tablespoon of Neem and 1 teaspoon of dishsoap in a gallon of water and spray twice weekly until symptoms disappear. Try to keep moisture away from the leaves if you can but with all the rain a cure is dubious at best.
Thanks, Chuck.......would be best to remove affected leaves, too?
 
Joined
Feb 2, 2014
Messages
6,655
Reaction score
3,332
Location
Tarpley Tx
Hardiness Zone
8b
Country
us
Thanks, Chuck.......would be best to remove affected leaves, too?
Severely infected leaves, yes. By this I mean the one's with brown margins and the mildew still on them. You don't want to remove to many because of photosynthesis. If these rainy cold fronts ever stop you can probably get ahead of the problem but as long as it stays wet and cloudy it will be tough. You can also sprinkle whole ground cornmeal over the plant and around the base which helps grow tricoderma fungi which eats mildew fungus.
 
Ad

Advertisements

Joined
Feb 2, 2014
Messages
6,655
Reaction score
3,332
Location
Tarpley Tx
Hardiness Zone
8b
Country
us
Severely infected leaves, yes. By this I mean the one's with brown margins and the mildew still on them. You don't want to remove to many because of photosynthesis. If these rainy cold fronts ever stop you can probably get ahead of the problem but as long as it stays wet and cloudy it will be tough. You can also sprinkle whole ground cornmeal over the plant and around the base which helps grow tricoderma fungi which eats mildew fungus.
Tell her that it works wonders for black spot on roses too. Just make a tea and spray and sprinkle meal around the base.
 
Joined
Jan 30, 2018
Messages
61
Reaction score
70
Hardiness Zone
8
Country
gb
Fungal infections of plants are a real pain. By the time the problem shows itself, the damage is done. Remove damaged/infected foliage. Looking at the photo. You could cut the damaged and infected leaves off, leave a tiny bit of the leaf stem. In many cases this will encourage new growth at the joint. Allow the foliage to dry a bit before applying any fungicides.

I note the comments regarding damp. I'd be inclined to cheat much of the leaf litter/mulch away from the plants. This in itself can be a breeding ground for all manner of spores etc. Brassics require to be firmly rooted, so tread the soil down around the plants base.
 
Ad

Advertisements

Joined
Oct 8, 2017
Messages
3,061
Reaction score
3,010
Location
Birmingham Alabama
Hardiness Zone
8a
Country
us
Fungal infections of plants are a real pain. By the time the problem shows itself, the damage is done. Remove damaged/infected foliage. Looking at the photo. You could cut the damaged and infected leaves off, leave a tiny bit of the leaf stem. In many cases this will encourage new growth at the joint. Allow the foliage to dry a bit before applying any fungicides.

I note the comments regarding damp. I'd be inclined to cheat much of the leaf litter/mulch away from the plants. This in itself can be a breeding ground for all manner of spores etc. Brassics require to be firmly rooted, so tread the soil down around the plants base.
I find it true around here that moist mulches can be host to problems. Even using heat cured compost can cause issues for me, though not necessarily immediately, rather somewhere down the line that rich food source attracts an appetite for destruction. I was watching a seed video where chicken grit and something else appropriately mineral was used as a surface coating to perform as an inhospitable surface. The idea is the same as I use outside in the garden where bare mineral earth is less hospitable than a nutrient rich, moist coating of organic matter. I already prepared the earth, I do not need any more.
 

Ask a Question

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

You'll need to choose a username for the site, which only take a couple of moments. After that, you can post your question and our members will help you out.

Ask a Question

Top