Does anybody use a weed torch?


Ad

Advertisements

alp

Joined
Mar 20, 2017
Messages
15,314
Reaction score
15,276
Location
Essex
Showcase(s):
3
Hardiness Zone
9b
Country
United Kingdom

Ian

Administrator
Joined
Mar 24, 2012
Messages
1,417
Reaction score
1,014
Location
Manchester
Hardiness Zone
9a
Country
United Kingdom
I've got a weed blowtorch, which I use to get weeds that grow between paving stone and the road - there's a relatively long and windy stretch and I don't want to use anything too unpleasant on it as we often have the neighbours cats and dogs nearby.

Thankfully there's nothing flammable near where I use it, other than the weeds themselves - it's great fun :D. However, I won't use it during Autumn, as there are so many dried up leaves blowing around that I could easy imagine something catching alight.
 
Ad

Advertisements

Joined
Mar 16, 2015
Messages
447
Reaction score
525
Hardiness Zone
USDA 10a - Sunset 22
Country
United States
Using a little soldering tank and tip I have not had any luck. I was only trying to do about 8 sq‘ as a test. If it was green it really took much time and gas to kill it. I didn't do much brown, but with much of my brown the real "life" of the weed is underground anyway. Also left kind of a mess in general as nothing was compeletely burned away.

I probably don't have as much area to deal with as some of you all, but the real eye opener to me was understanding what weeds are annual and what weeds are perennial. If annual scrape the top off and many will not come back up. If perennial pull. Do this before they start going to seed and you will see the results over the course of the next year or two.
 
Joined
Oct 8, 2017
Messages
5,179
Reaction score
4,216
Location
Birmingham, AL USA
Hardiness Zone
8a
Country
United States
I can see the residual char as being useful for the garden. We have irrigation lines runs so errant flame is no issue. Its not a huge patch either, but big enough that hand pulling is just not really working for me, though I have pulled after rains and brought wheelbarrow load after load of grass to the compost pile.

@Chuck I found this on the net:

According to the publication NFPA58, a tank with 20 pounds of gas at 70°F has a pressure of 145 psi, at 90°F would have 180 psi, at 105°F would have 235 psi, and at 130°F would have 315 psi.
 
Joined
Feb 2, 2014
Messages
9,502
Reaction score
4,423
Location
Tarpley Tx
Hardiness Zone
8b
Country
United States
I can see the residual char as being useful for the garden. We have irrigation lines runs so errant flame is no issue. Its not a huge patch either, but big enough that hand pulling is just not really working for me, though I have pulled after rains and brought wheelbarrow load after load of grass to the compost pile.

@Chuck I found this on the net:

According to the publication NFPA58, a tank with 20 pounds of gas at 70°F has a pressure of 145 psi, at 90°F would have 180 psi, at 105°F would have 235 psi, and at 130°F would have 315 psi.
Thanks
 
Ad

Advertisements


Ask a Question

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

You'll need to choose a username for the site, which only take a couple of moments. After that, you can post your question and our members will help you out.

Ask a Question

Top